Showing posts with label Upanishads. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Upanishads. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Is Considered The Author Of The Yajnavalkya Smrti?

 

Yajnavalkya is mentioned in the Upanishads, the theoretical books that make up the Veda's most recent textual layer, as a sage affiliated with King Janaka's court who was able to demonstrate that he had higher knowledge than the rest.

Based on the pattern of legendary ascription present in these works, he is also assigned as the author of the Yajnavalkya Smrti, one of the books that make up the dharma literature.


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Hinduism - What Is The Rig Veda?

 


Rg Veda is a Hindu scripture.

The most ancient and authoritative Hindu holy writings, and the oldest and most significant of the four Vedas.

The Rig Veda is a collection of 1,028 hymns in 10 books.

The hymns were definitely written over a lengthy period of time based on their substance, but the exact dates are a point of contention.

Traditional Hindus believe that the Vedas were not written by God or humans, but rather by ancient sages who heard them via their enhanced abilities of perception and passed them down orally from generation to generation.

The Vedas are therefore classified as shruti ("heard") holy scriptures because of their origin.

The Vedas were started in the early second millennium B.C.E., maybe 1800–1500 B.C.E., and ended towards the end of the second millennium B.C.E., perhaps 1200–900 B.C.E., according to scholarly agreement.

All of these dates are very speculative, since the hymns themselves have no internal evidence to support precise dating, which has instead been relied mostly on a comparative analysis of changes in the language of the Vedas.

Some hymns, for example, are regarded to have been written later than others, both because their vocabulary is less archaic and closer to classical Sanskrit, and because the places referenced in them cover a larger geographical range.

The Rig Veda's hymns are mostly devoted to a single god.

Indra, Agni, and Soma are the primary deities, however Varuna is mentioned in the oldest hymns.

The hymns were sung during sacrifices to summon these deities, according to popular belief.

According to the hymns, these sacrifices were massive public ceremonies that frequently included the murder of animals, which were then burnt on a sacrificial fire, as well as the preparation and consumption of the enigmatic beverage soma.

The Vedic hymns represent a corpus of holy knowledge that is only known to a restricted number of religious specialists in this environment.

Since a result, these songs were never intended for widespread public dissemination, as everyone save twice-born males were prohibited from hearing them.

The tenth and last book of the Rig Veda varies significantly from the others.

Its language is more akin to traditional Sanskrit, and its subject is significantly more speculative than the preceding volumes, implying a significant conceptual leap.

The renowned Creation Hymn (10.129) is included in this book, in which the poet speculates on how the universe came to be, only to conclude that even the creator may not know the answer.

The Purusha Sukta (10.90) is another famous hymn in this collection, which views both the world and human civilization as the result of a primal sacrifice.

The theological and cosmic speculation contained in the Upanishads is foreshadowed in the previous song.

The latter is distinguished as predicting later dharma literature because it provides the earliest known articulation of the four primary social groupings (varnas) and their symbolic purposes.


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Hinduism - What Is Nirguna In Hindu Spirituality?


 ("devoid of attributes") The highest feature of heavenly reality's epithet.

Many Hindu traditions hold that God is ultimately devoid of traits and attributes, transcending all particularity and being superior to any qualifying form.

The Upanishads, the theoretical religious scriptures that constitute the most recent component of the Vedas, and philosophical traditions founded on the Upanishads, such as Advaita Vedanta, are the first to express this notion.

Certain Hindu theistic traditions, such as the Gaudiya Vaishnava religious group, disagree with this idea, believing that a specific deity—in this instance, Krishna—is the Ultimate Reality.


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Hinduism - What Or Who Is Considered Nirakara In Hindu Spirituality?


 ("devoid of shape") The highest feature of heavenly reality's epithet.

Many Hindu traditions hold that God is essentially formless, transcending all particularity and being superior to any particular depiction.

This view is originally expressed in the Upanishads, the speculative religious scriptures that represent the most recent portion of the Vedas, and is promoted by Upanishad-based intellectual systems like Advaita Vedanta.

Certain Hindu theistic traditions, such as the Gaudiya Vaishnava religious group, disagree with this idea, believing that a specific deity—in this instance, Krishna—is the Ultimate Reality.


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Hinduism - What Is The Kena Upanishad?

 

Kena Upanishad is one of the first speculative works, the Upanishads, whose name is derived from the first word of the book itself.

The first two portions of the Kena Upanishad are written in poetry, whereas the third and fourth sections are written in prose.

Despite its length, this modification gives the text a disconnected air, raising the likelihood that it is a combination of two prior manuscripts.

The Kena Upanishad, like many of the later upanishads, asserts that the ultimate cause of all existence is assigned to a single force that can only be revealed by a flash of mystic insight.

“It is conceived by one who does not conceive of it, it is not conceived by one who conceives, it is not known by those who believe they know it, it is known by those who think they do not know it,” the stanza portions explain (verse 2.3).

The prose sections are very different, recounting an interaction between a mystery figure (Brahman personified) and some of the early Vedic gods—Indra, Agni, and Vayu.

Despite their best attempts, the gods are unable to use their distinct abilities of storm, fire, and wind, demonstrating that their divine power is derived from Brahman rather than being their own.

 


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Hinduism - What Is The Katha Upanishad?


One of the later and more developed Upanishads, the theoretical religious teachings that make up the most recent layer of the Vedas, the oldest Hindu holy scriptures.

The Katha Upanishad, like other of the Upanishads, addresses deep questions, including the essence of the Self (atman).

The narrative narrates the tale of Nachiketas, a little child whose father, in a moment of rage, puts him to death.

Nachiketas visits Death's house, but there is no one there.

He has to wait three days for Death to return.

Death grants Nachiketas three boons, or desires, to make atonement for disregarding a brahmin visitor, which the book defines as a grievous transgression.

The first boon allows Nachiketas to return to his father's home, while the second allows him to learn how to conduct a sacrifice fire.

With the last boon, he inquires as to what happens to a person once the body dies.

Death initially attempts to avoid answering the question, then offers Nachiketas additional gifts in exchange for his silence.

Death starts to expose his secrets when the youngster presses on a response; these disclosures make up the majority of the book.

The truth of the Self, its eternal and indestructible nature, its nuanced traits, and the challenges in realizing it are the key themes of Death's mysteries.

The ultimate truth is the Self, and knowing it is to know the only thing that really counts.



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Hinduism - What Is The Isha Upanishad?

 

The Isha ("Lord") Upanishad is a Hindu scripture.

One of the smallest of the early theoretical manuscripts known as the Upanishads, with just eighteen lines; the title derives from the first word of the text.

Due to its shortness, creation in poetry rather than prose, and usage of poems from other upanishads, it is thought to be one of the late upanishads.

The Isha Upanishad, like many later upanishads, proposes a loosely defined monism, in which all phenomena are attributed to a single force.

This power may be found by a flash of mystic insight, in which the seeker is able to see through the illusion that items are interconnected and perceive the universe's one true force.

The insight is said to provide a comprehensive understanding of the workings of the cosmos, as well as the individual's ultimate liberation from the cycle of rebirth (moksha) (samsara).

 


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