Showing posts with label yajamana. Show all posts
Showing posts with label yajamana. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Is A Yajamana?

 


("sacrifice's patron"). The yajamana was the person who commissioned the sacrifice and paid for its fulfillment, and therefore stood to profit from its expected benefits, according to the Vedas, the earliest Hindu religious literature.

This word distinguishes the connection between the priest and the patron: the former were erudite men and ritual technologists who understood how to execute elaborate sacrificial rituals, but they were reliant on the patronage of their sponsors for their subsistence.


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Hinduism - Who Is A Jajman?


Jajman is a common version of the Sanskrit term yajamana, which means "sacrifice patron." There was a clear separation between the persons who executed the sacrifice (essentially hired technicians) and the people who provided the money to sponsor it and were considered the ultimate beneficiaries of the ritual from the time of the first Vedic sacrifices.

In modern times, pandas, or priests at pilgrimage sites (tirtha), use the name jajman to refer to their pilgrim clientele, with whom they have a hereditary tie.

The pilgrims are their patrons, of course, since the priests' livelihood is based on serving them, but the phrase also connotes a sense of reciprocal duty.

Pandas are entitled to money from their pilgrim customers, but they must also provide services to them, whilst pilgrims are obligated to maintain this hereditary connection but may rely on their pandas for assistance. 


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.