Showing posts with label Indo-European Language. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Indo-European Language. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is The Modern Indo-European (National) Language Of Hindi? Why Is It Widely Perceived As A Current Imperialist Threat To Native Minority Indian Tongues, Script, And Culture?


Modern Indian language classified as a member of the Indo-European language family; Hindi is the Republic of India's "official" language.

Hindi is spoken as a second or "link" language in much of northern and central India, as well as as a "mother" tongue in parts of Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh.

It is also one of the broadcast languages for the Indian government's television and radio networks, which may be found all around the country thanks to these media.

Hindi, like many of India's regional languages, has a lengthy literary history, especially in an older form known as Braj Bhasha, which was the primary language in which northern Indian devotional (bhakti) poetry was composed.

The gradual extinction of Sanskrit in modern times has aided the rise of Hindi as a literary language, a studied language, and a medium for writing about Indian culture.

In contemporary India, speaking a particular language frequently has political ramifications, since keeping one's regional language has been a key role in sustaining regional identities.

As a result, many people are adamant about avoiding allowing Hindi to supplant their native tongues.

This feeling is especially strong in southern India, where the imposition of the Hindi language is seen as a new type of imperialism.

 

You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - Who Speaks Bengali Or Bangla In India?

 




Present Indian language belonging to the Indo-European language family, spoken in the modern Bengal area. 



Bengali, like many of India's regional languages, has a rich history as a literary language. 



  • Calcutta was India's most significant cultural hub in the nineteenth century, as well as a hotbed of opposition to British authority. 


  • Bengali was utilized as a vernacular language in revolutionary politics at that time, especially by Bankim Chandra Chatterjee and Aurobindo Ghose; it was also the language of religious leaders like as Ramprasad and Ramakrishna.



You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.