Showing posts with label Mindfulness Exercise. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Mindfulness Exercise. Show all posts

7 Step Mindfulness Physical Sensations Exercise

 


Whether it's a chair, the ground, your bed, or the air surrounding you, your body is always in contact with something. This is a fantastic approach to tune in to your current situation. 

You can be aware of these places of touch at any moment, whether in meditation or in your regular life. 

Because the feelings are often easy to detect, this is an excellent practice for beginners. 

“Mindfulness is the acceptance of the present moment with awareness and balance. It doesn't get much more straightforward than that. It is accepting or opening to the present moment, pleasurable or unpleasant, precisely as it is, without clinging to it or rejecting it.” ~ SYLVIA BOORSTEIN


Instructions


  1. This exercise may be done in any posture, however I recommend doing it while sitting. Close your eyes and focus your attention on your body's posture. Make whatever modest modifications necessary to put your body at peace. 
  2. Begin by observing the areas of the body that are in contact with anything else. Can you feel your feet making touch with the ground? Pay attention to the sensations in your feet. There isn't anything exciting to do. Simply pay attention to how your feet are feeling right now. 
  3. Continue until you can feel your back end making contact with the chair or cushion. Take note of the upper thighs' touch and pressure with the chair. Rest your consciousness here, paying attention to how this feels in your body. 
  4. Bring your focus to your hands, wherever they may be. Feel the locations where your hands are contacting, where you're sitting on your lap, or where your knees are resting. Concentrate on the part of the hand that is making touch with something else. 
  5. Now look for places on your body where you can feel the feeling of the garments. You can run your hand over your body to see whether this sensation is present. The locations where the garment ends and the skin is exposed, such as the arms, neck, and ankles, may be the easiest to feel. 
  6. Finally, pay attention to the feel of air against your skin. You may notice that the temperature of the air on the palm of your hand differs from the temperature on the back of your hand. If you're sitting outside, you could notice the breeze. There is no such thing as right or wrong. Don't be afraid to speak from your personal experience. 
  7. Bring attention to the places of touch throughout the day once you've completed this practice. Feel your body come into touch with the chair whenever you sit down. When you stand up, take note of where your feet are on the ground. 



DEALING WITH OVERWHELMED FEELINGS 


When you first start exploring body awareness, you may realize that multiple sensations are vying for your attention at the same time. 

Try utilizing a mental note or a short phrase while monitoring a certain part of your body to help keep your attention focused. 

  • Consider the phrase "feet. feet. feet" while tuning in to the feet. 
  • Alternatively, if you believe a command would be more effective (which it often is), try “feel my feet. feel my feet. feel my feet.” 
  • Link your inhales and exhales to the rhythm of the words. Congratulations on your achievement! It's as easy as that. You're chanting mantras.


You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation and Healing here.





Mindfulness of Breath and Body



Finding the Breath in Your Body is a direct experience. When people strive to become more conscious of their breathing, they may picture or picture it. They may also be thinking about their breath. They even say to themselves from time to time: Hey, I'm breathing, see, I'm breathing in, that was a long breath, now I'm breathing out... 

None of these strategies will help you stay focused on the breath (although mental labeling might assist.

Feeling the breath is the key to awareness in breathing exercise. It's crucial to keep your breathing practice from becoming conceptual or cerebral. 


Mindfulness allows you to connect directly to an experience rather than getting caught in its notion. Breath is a bodily sense that may be immediately felt, rather than a notion. 

  • You may think a lot about breath—for example, when you take the time to learn about the science of breathing and breath regulation—but mindfulness requires you to let go of the notions and focus on the "felt sense"—how you actually feel your breath. 
  • This relaxes your cognitive functioning and helps you to learn on a more intuitive level. 
  • After reading this, close your eyes and simply feel your breath in your body to get the felt feeling. 

You can find yourself focusing on one region, or you could notice that your breath is felt throughout your entire body, in moving portions of your body, or in specific places of your body, such as your belly button or nose. Wavelike sensations or little ripples of movement may be felt in various parts of your body. This is when you feel your breath rather than thinking about it. 


You can examine some of those particular regions since you may observe your breathing in a number of places in your body. 


Concentrate your physical and sensory focus on your abdomen. 

  • Put your hand on your abdomen to get a better sense of it. 
  • Are you able to breathe without needing to do anything? 
  • Your stomach is swaying back and forth. 


Take a minute to notice any feelings in your abdomen, then return. 

What did you pick up on? 

  • We're guessing you had a rising and falling experience, an expanding sensation, inflation and deflation sensations, and maybe a contraction in the conclusion. 
  • Perhaps a little moment of silence before the next breath began. 
  • Not what you're envisioning or thinking about the breath, but what you're feeling—the felt sense—is what you're striving to become aware of. 


Another place to pay attention to your breath is in your chest and neck.

Take a few deep breaths in your chest. 

  • What are your thoughts? It's most likely something similar to your abdominal breathing, but a little more widespread. 
  • Do you feel your shoulders heaving slightly when you engage in the action? Remember that everyone's experience with mindfulness will be different, therefore you can't feel the breath wrongly. 


Now pay attention to your nostrils: 


Close your eyes and take a few deep breaths through your nostrils. 

What do you think you've noticed? 

  • As the air rushes in and out, you could get a sense of cold or warmth. Maybe you're getting a tickle on the top of your lip. Perhaps you're aware of a little movement in your nose. 
  • Finally, as your mindfulness meditation practice progresses, you'll want to identify one area to focus on that will serve as your own personal anchor. 
  • Although your breath is your anchor, it might be beneficial to focus your attention on a specific place of your body where you feel your breath. 
  • Choose your belly, chest, or nose as your anchor for sensing the breath once you've investigated these three distinct anchor sites.

Select a location depending on what is most obvious, simplest, or most fascinating to you. If you're having trouble deciding, simply select one—they'll all function just as well. What matters is that you are at ease in your surroundings. 

Alternatively, some people may feel the breath most vividly as it moves through their entire body, which can also serve as a general anchor. 

It may take some time to find your place, so try out a few different ones at the start of your meditation practice until you find one that works for you.


You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation and Healing here.



19 Step Mindfulness Eating Exercise



Now we'll move away from bodily mindfulness and hearing mindfulness and focus on the sensations of taste, smell, and sight, beginning with the food we eat. 

“Let us establish ourselves in the present now, eating in such a way that solidity, joy, and tranquility be attainable at the time of eating,” says renowned Vietnamese monk Thich Nhat Hanh. 


Eating allows you to feed your body while also feeding your mindfulness practice. 


“To be entirely involved with what you are doing right now is the actual secret of life. And instead of calling it work, acknowledge that it is actually play.” 


This technique can be done in any position, however being motionless while eating is beneficial. 

This reduces distracting stimuli and allows you to concentrate on the event. This may be done with any food. 


Instructions

  1. Starting with something simple, such as raisins, berries, or a handful of your favorite vegetables, is a good place to start. Begin by visually observing the meal. 
  2. Take note of the many colors, shapes, and sizes. Observe your want to consume while you gaze at the food. There's nothing wrong with being hungry, but desires should be allowed to come and go. 
  3. Return your attention to the meal. After that, look into the food's odor. Some meals have more potent odors than others, and you may need to hold the meal up to your nose to detect them. 
  4. Allow yourself to be fully immersed in the sensation of smelling. 
  5. Simply refocus your attention to the fragrance in front of you when your mind begins to want. 
  6. Take a minute before you eat to appreciate the energy that went into its creation. People toiled to cultivate and deliver this food to you. Nutrients, rainfall, and sunshine were all given by Mother Nature. 
  7. Perhaps someone else prepared, cleaned, or packaged it for you. Bring to recall all of the energy that came together to produce this meal from numerous sources. Slowly take up the food now. 
  8. If you're using any utensils, pay attention to the sensation of touch as you use them. Consider how the food or utensil in your hand feels. 
  9. Is the meal cold, heated, stiff, or soft? 
  10. Observe your impulse to chew and swallow fast as you place the food in your mouth. Instead, begin by feeling the food's temperature. 
  11. Can you feel the form of the food in your mouth? Take note of the texture of the meal as you begin to chew. Do you notice any changes while you chew? 
  12. Take note of the tastes. You could find it difficult to do more than name what you're eating, such as "It's a raspberry." 
  13. Make an effort to delve a bit deeper. Is there a variety of flavors? 
  14. As you continue to chew, pay attention to how the flavors change. 
  15. Tune in to the sensation of swallowing when you swallow each bite. How does it feel as the food passes down your throat? 
  16. You could also feel compelled to take another taste right away. 
  17. Take a moment to see whether any flavor lingers in your tongue. You may keep eating this way as long as you remind yourself to slow down and be present. 
  18. Continue to notice any new sights, scents, tastes, sensations, or ideas that come to mind. 
  19. Allow yourself to feel grateful for the food that is sustaining your body after you have finished eating. Allow your thoughts to relax into a sense of gratitude for the energy and life around you. 


What to When you Start to Hurry while Eating?


Mindful eating is a patience-testing practice that also demands some self-control. 

  • If you try to eat slowly, you may find that you have a strong desire to eat faster. 
  • Most of us normally begin preparing our next piece of food while still eating our previous meal. 
  • Slow eating is the cornerstone of mindful eating. Simply pause, breathe, and slow down if a hunger takes over.


You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation and Healing here.



6 Step Mindfulness Exercise to Find the Breath


The body breathes continually, and the breath moves continually. Not only is your breath the ideal place to start, but it's also a constant that you can return to whenever you need a little centering. 

You will softly locate the breath in the body in this initial practice. Nothing has to be figured out, no issues need to be solved, and nothing extraordinary has to be done. 

Return to your firsthand sense of body breathing on a regular basis. You're teaching your mind to focus on a single event without being distracted. 


Instructions

  1. Find a body posture that is comfortable for you. Sitting is frequently advised since it keeps the body alert and energetic. You can also try standing or resting flat on your back. You can use a yoga mat, a meditation cushion, or a chair to sit on. For a few minutes of silence, choose anything that feels comfortable and sustained. 
  2. Allow the eyes to shut gently. Try lightly staring at the floor or ceiling if you're more at ease with your eyes open (depending on your position). Allow the eyes to settle in one place and relax. The goal is to keep your practice as distraction-free as possible. 
  3. Bring your attention to your stomach. See if you can feel the natural rising and falling by relaxing the muscles there. Assume the body is breathing on its own. Observe the movement from the navel to the obliques with each inhalation. Like thus, take a few deep breathes. 
  4. Raise your awareness to your chest. Pay attention to the expansion of the lungs and the lifting of the chest when you inhale. Feel the constriction and movement as you exhale. Try following the sensation of your breath from the start of your inhale to the finish of your exhale. 
  5. Pay close attention to the nostrils now. Here, the sensation of breathing may be more mild. Take a deep breath and see what comes up for you. As you breathe in, you may feel a tiny tickling at the tip of your nose. On the walk out, you may notice that your breath is somewhat warmer. 
  6. In one of these three areas, focus your attention on your body's breathing. Refocus on the immediate feeling of the breath when the mind wanders. For a minute or two, keep an eye on your breath. Bring this awareness into your daily life when you finish this term of practice. To assist the mind stay present, stay in touch with your body's breath. 


Our Mind, The Wanderer

The mind's natural instinct is to wander. Even the most experienced meditators suffer from wandering thoughts! The brain was created to analyze data; it's simply doing its job. 

Instead of perceiving this as a problem, consider it a chance to improve your awareness. 

Bring forgiveness, curiosity, and patience to these times, and bring your attention back to the breath anytime it wanders.


You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation and Healing here.