Showing posts with label Mindfulness Exercise. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Mindfulness Exercise. Show all posts

Mindfulness Meditation - What Is Loving-Kindness Meditation?





     





    THIS FORM OF MEDITATION CONDITIONS HAPPINESS, PEACE, LOVE, AND MEDITATION WITHIN. 


    It also trains the mind to easily reach a state of loving-kindness and compassion for all creatures, including yourself. 



    These basic phrases underpins the practice: 


    May all creatures be free of pain. 

    May there be no ill will among all creatures. 

    May all creatures be imbued with compassion and love. 

    May all creatures experience true happiness. 




    Loving Kindness meditation  is divided into three sections. 



    To begin, you must mentally create these emotions as intensely as possible. 


    • Make the greatest effort you can, since this one portion determines the outcome of the whole exercise. 
    • It gets simpler to create these emotions the more you nurture them. 


    The second step is to create a strong desire for others to feel the same way you do. 


    • This will take up the most of your practice time and will include many visualizations. 
    • Begin by picturing the people and things for whom you have the greatest appreciation and affection. 
    • Then go on to individuals you don't know as well, then neutral people, and finally total strangers. 
    • Then there are the individuals you hate or have problems with. 


    Finally, broaden this desire to encompass all living things everywhere. 


    • Finally, remind yourself that you, too, need and deserve to feel comfortable, at ease, full with love, and joyful. 
    • Don't undervalue the significance of this; despite our proclivity for selfishness, we find it the most difficult of all people to genuinely love. 




    THE PRACTICE



    Set a timer for your meditation—say, 30 minutes to an hour—but feel free to modify it as needed. 

    Begin your meditation by following the four-step transition to the breath at the nose, counting ten breaths, and then tracking the breath until your mind is calm. 





    1. GENERATION OF INATE FEELINGS AND EMOTIONS.


    • Allow the breath sensations to fade into the background of awareness until you are fully present with a calm, clear mind and well-focused attention. 
    • They should stay in place for the length of your sit, which will help you maintain your focus. 


    Make the following wish: 


    • May I be free of pain. 
    • Bring to mind, as vividly as possible, what it's like to be totally free of any sort of mental or bodily pain. 
    • Make a list of the ways you are now suffering-free. 
    • Reminisce over days when life was simpler and more comfortable. 
    • Make up your own story. 
    • Do whatever it takes to get a clear, powerful feeling of what it's like to be pain-free, fully relaxed, and at peace in both mind and body. 



    Then, without sacrificing your sense of ease and contentment, express the following wish: 


    • May I be free of malice. 
    • Bring to mind, as vividly as possible, what it's like to be totally free of all malice and at peace with everything and everyone. 
    • Pay attention to the calm you're experiencing right now. 
    • Remember, visualize, or do anything else you can to create a clear, powerful sense of being free of ill-will, with no residue of hatred, wrath, or resentment in your heart, as you did previously. 
    • Feel totally at ease with your surroundings. 



    Make the wish: 



    • May I be filled with loving-kindness, without losing these sensations of comfort and serenity. 
    • Bring to mind, as vividly as possible, what it feels like to be overwhelmed with beautiful, heartfelt emotions of love and compassion. 
    • Consider someone you care about and the feelings of tenderness and compassion that they evoke in you. 
    • Remember, visualize, or do whatever you can to create a clear, powerful sense of loving-kindness and profound care, just like you did previously. 



    Make the wish: 


    • May I be really happy, without losing these emotions of comfort, serenity, and love. 
    • Bring to mind, as vividly as possible, what it feels like to be really happy, satisfied, wanting and needing nothing, soaked with the sheer joy of being alive. 
    • Make a mental note of how happy you are right now. 
    • Remember, fantasize, or do anything else that helps trigger happy emotions, like previously. 
    • Sit for a few moments, soaking in the sensation of being free of sorrow, at peace, and overflowing with love and pleasure. 




    2. GENERATING WISHES FOR OTHERS.



    Say to yourself, 

    • "Just as I want to be free from suffering, free from ill-will, filled with loving-kindness, and genuinely joyful, so do all creatures wish for these things." 



    Consider someone you really care for and have positive emotions for, someone who has aided and soothed you in some manner. 


    Make the following wish while picturing this person as vividly as you can, wherever you believe they may be at this time, doing whatever they could be doing: 


    • May (name) be liberated from pain. 
    • May (name) be free of any malice. 
    • May (name) be surrounded by love and compassion. 
    • May (name) experience true happiness. 

    Send these emotions from your heart to theirs, from your thoughts to theirs, as you do so. 


    • Imagine this person's face as they experience a feeling of ease and comfort, peace and goodwill, lovingkindness, and genuine pleasure that appears out of nowhere. 
    • When you've done with this individual, choose another person you care about and do the same for him or her. 


    You may choose as many individuals as you want. 

    If the emotions you've worked so hard to develop start to dissipate, take a few minutes to strengthen them again. 



    When you're ready, consider individuals with whom you aren't as close and for whom you have less love. 


    • These individuals may be coworkers, neighbors, or casual acquaintances. 
    • Select one of them and envision where they are and what they are doing. 
    • Repeat the process of making the wish, sending your good emotions to them as a gift, and visualizing the look on their face when they become aware of those feelings when you can image them in your mind. 
    • Do it once or as many times as you'd want with as many different individuals as you'd like. 
    • Take the time to renew your emotions of comfort, serenity, love, and satisfied satisfaction if they diminish. 



    When you're ready, consider individuals you come across on a regular basis but don't know well, such as cashiers, waiters, or school crossing guards. 



    • Pick one and dedicate the loving-kindness practice to them. 
    • You can do this with as many people as you want. 
    • When you're ready, consider individuals with whom you've had problems or whom you hate. 
    • It may help to remember yourself that they, like you and everyone else, are susceptible to all kinds of pain. 

    Remember that whatever animosity you have against them causes you to suffer, depriving you of serenity and happiness. 


    Similarly, whatever animosity they have against you simply contributes to their own suffering. 



    • Whatever love they feel and whatever genuine pleasure they have can only benefit others around them. 
    • It may be difficult to practice loving-kindness with someone you hate, so start with someone you don't have strong emotions towards or with whom you have just had a dispute. 
    • Imagine him or her in your thoughts, make the wish, give them your good vibes, and watch as they are affected by your good vibes. 




    Carry out this exercise with as many tough individuals as you feel comfortable with. 


    Never forget to replenish your emotions of comfort, serenity, love, and satisfied contentment whenever they begin to diminish. 



    • It is just not effective practice to go through the motions without having these emotions in your heart. 
    • You may need to practice loving-kindness for weeks or even months before you're ready to deal with the most challenging individuals in your life, but that's the objective. 
    • It's essential not to hurry, but you should ultimately build up to those you despise the most—your greatest adversaries, people who have wronged you in ways you haven't yet been able to forgive. 



    When you've gone as far as you can with tough individuals during a session, go on to big groups of people. 



    • Consider the people who reside in your immediate vicinity. 
    • Create a wish for them. 
    • Send your best wishes to them. 
    • Imagine your whole neighborhood being filled with joy, love, serenity, and comfort at the same time. 
    • These priceless emotions are endless in your heart. 
    • They grow more powerful the more you send them out. 
    • Consider your whole city and do the same. 
    • Rep with the rest of your country. 
    • Then go to everyone on the globe, and finally to every sentient creature. 


    Finish by making the wish and giving these similar good emotions to every living thing in the cosmos. 




    3. DIRECTING THE WISH TOWARDS YOURSELF. 



    Now, focus all of your emotions on yourself. 

    Remind yourself that you, like everyone else, are deserving of peace, love, and happiness. 


    The most direct route to loving and accepting others is to love and accept yourself—with all your flaws and faults. 


    Say to yourself, 


    • May I continue to be free of pain since I am no less worthy than anybody else.
    • May I be free of malice for the rest of my life. 
    • May I be filled with loving-kindness in the future. 
    • May I be genuinely happy for the rest of my life. 


    Finish by expressing a strong desire for these emotions to persist, and resolving to behave in a manner that allows this to happen. 

    Make it your mission to embody these priceless mental traits so that you may share them with others. 

    Commit to utilizing this meditation as a model for loving-kindness practice in your everyday life. 




    ONE LAST THOUGHT.



    People often oppose to this technique because they believe it is artificial. 

    Please don't pass judgment until you've given it a go. 

    This is one of the most effective meditation techniques for changing the way your mind functions. 

    You don't have to think that the loving-kindness emotions you put out have any tangible impact on others, but it helps. 



    The idea is that we all have limitless reserves of patience, forgiveness, compassion, love, and happiness. 

    This exercise teaches the mind and heart to access those resources more readily, while also providing a sense of pleasure and delight.



    You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.




    Mindfulness - Mindfulness As A Tool To Assist You



    Do you ever get lost in thought? 


    • Your mind is free to think anything it wants for the most of the day while you go about your regular tasks. 
    • You're in 'automatic pilot' mode. 


    However, some of your automatic thoughts may be harmful to you, or you may be so engrossed in them that you don't see what's going on around you. 


    • For example, you go for a relaxing stroll in the park, but your mind is preoccupied with your next assignment. 
    • If your thoughts are unhelpful, you are first not really living in the present moment, and second, you are making yourself more worried, nervous, or sad. 
    • Mindfulness isn't about resolving issues. 

    Acceptance comes first in mindfulness, and change may or may not follow. 


    If you suffer from anxiety, mindfulness teaches you how to accept rather than reject or battle your worry, and transformation occurs spontaneously as a result of this approach. 


    ‘What we oppose endures,' as the old adage goes. 

    ‘What you accept transforms,' says mindfulness. 

     

    This explains how mindfulness may benefit you in a variety of ways. 


    1. Creating A Healing Environment
    2. Being Able To Relax More 
    3. Increasing Efficiency
    4. Improving Wisdom And  Increasing Knowledge
    5. Finding Out Who You Are


    Acceptance in mindfulness refers to acknowledging your present-moment experience.

     Acceptance is not the same as resignation or surrender.


    You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.



    Mindfulness - Finding Out Who You Are



    Mindfulness may take you on a fascinating journey of self-discovery. 


    • The term person is derived from the Latin word persona, which originally meant a theater figure or a mask. 
    • The term "discovery" refers to the act of uncovering or uncovering something. 
    • In this way, personal discovery is about peeling back the layers of your mask. 

    ‘All the world is a theater, and all the men and women are just actors,' Shakespeare remarked. 


    You learn to view your roles, personas, or masks as part of who you are as a result of mindfulness practice. 


    • You may continue to assist others, make money, or do anything you choose, but you recognize that this is just one way of looking at things, one dimension of your existence. 
    • You probably wear a variety of masks depending on the character you're playing. 
    • You may be a parent, a child, a spouse, or an employee. 
    • Each of these positions requires you to fulfill certain responsibilities. 
    • You may not realize that mindfulness practice can help you remove all of your masks. Mindfulness allows you to just be yourself. 
    • You may get distinct sensations of a sense of being while practicing mindfulness meditation. 
    • You may have a profound feeling of serenity, quiet, and calmness. 
    • Your physical body, which is typically substantial, fades into the background of your consciousness at times, and you feel connected to your surroundings. 


    Some individuals get emotionally connected to these events and want to replicate them, as though they're getting closer to something. 

    However, as time passes, you realize that even apparently joyful moments come and go. 

    Take advantage of them while they're here, and then let them leave. 

    You may come to realize that you're a witness to life's events if you practice mindfulness. 


    In your mindfulness practice, thoughts, emotions, and physical sensations come and go, but a part of you is just watching it all - awareness itself. 

    This is a pretty basic phenomenon that everyone can see and feel. 

    Being genuinely oneself is so basic that it's easy to miss. 

    As this witness, you are flawless, entire, and complete exactly as you are, according to Eastern philosophy. 

    Because you connect with your ideas and feelings, which are always changing, you may not feel flawless. 

     

    At the end of the day, you don't need to do anything to achieve this natural condition because you are it all the time - right now. 


    Mindfulness is not about self-improvement for these reasons. You are perfect exactly the way you are at the heart of your existence! 

    Mindfulness exercises and meditations are simply meant to assist in the training of your brain to become more focused and peaceful, as well as your heart to become more warm and open. 


    Mindfulness isn't about altering yourself; it's about recognizing that you're wonderful in your own skin. 

    ‘What a freedom to understand that the “voice in my head” is not who I am,' says Eckhart Tolle, author of A New Earth: Create a Better Life. 

    So, who am I? 'Whoever sees that.' You'll be less bothered by life's ups and downs once you realize you're the witness of all experience. 


    This knowledge may help you live a happy life. It's a little bit simpler to go with the flow and look at life as an adventure rather than a series of difficulties when you go with the flow.


    You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.



    Mindfulness - Improving Wisdom And Increasing Knowledge



    Wisdom is prized in both Eastern and Western cultures. 

    Philosophy, according to Socrates and Plato, is literally the desire of wisdom (philo-sophia). 


    • Wisdom is your fundamental essence, according to Eastern traditions, and it leads to profound satisfaction for yourself as well as helping others discover pleasure inside themselves. 
    • You may get access to more knowledge. 
    • Because you learn to control your own thoughts and emotions, mindfulness leads to knowledge. 


    You don't think a negative idea is real just because you have one. 


    • When you're dealing with difficult emotions like sorrow, worry, or irritation, you may use mindfulness to process them rather of allowing them to dominate you. 
    • You'll be able to listen closely to people and form satisfying, long-lasting connections as your emotional equilibrium improves. 
    • You can make better choices when your thinking is clear. 
    • You may be happy and healthier if you have an open heart. 
    • Because of your increased awareness, mindfulness leads to knowledge. 
    • You become more conscious of how you interact with yourself, others, and the environment. 
    • You'll be in a lot better position to make educated decisions with this increased awareness. 
    • You are consciously aware and take action based on contemplation and what is in the best interests of everyone, including yourself, rather than existing mechanically like a robot. 


    The Dalai Lama is someone I admire for his wisdom. 


    • He's nice and sensitive, and he cares about other people's well-being. 
    • He aspires to make the world a better place by reducing pain and increasing pleasure. 
    • He's not egotistical, he smiles a lot, and he doesn't appear overburdened by his responsibilities or the tremendous losses he's suffered. 
    • People seem to relish the opportunity to spend time with him. 
    • He seems to live in a thoughtful manner. 

    Regard the individuals you consider to be smart. 

    What distinguishes them? 

    I'm guessing you find them attentive and cognizant of their activities, rather than repetitive and buried in their own thoughts.


    You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.



    Mindfulness - Increasing Efficiency



    When it comes to being attentive, it's best to focus on one item at a time. 


    • When you walk, you just walk. 
    • You simply listen while you're listening. 
    • You simply write while you're writing. 
    • By practicing formal and casual mindfulness meditation you're educating your brain with mindful attitudes like,
        • Compassion,
        • Curiosity, 
        • Acknowledgment  
    • So, if you're writing a report, you concentrate as much as possible on that task without overworking yourself. 

    Each time your mind wanders to another idea, you note what you were thinking about (curiosity), and then gently direct your focus back to the writing (remember, you're being nice to yourself). 


    As a result, you complete your report faster (with less time spent thinking about other things), and the work is likely to be of higher quality (because you gave the report your full attention). 


    The more you can concentrate on what you're doing, the more you'll be able to accomplish. 

    • Wow, mindfulness can help you work more efficiently! 
    • You can't just decide to concentrate on your job and then do so. 
    • The ability to pay attention isn't something you can decide on the spur of the moment. 
    • Attention may be honed in the same way that biceps can be honed at a gym. 

    Mindfulness is a mental workout. 


    You do not, however, need to exert as much effort as you would while exercising out. 

    You must be gentle while teaching the mind to be alert, otherwise the mind will grow less attentive.


    This is why mindfulness necessitates compassion. 

    • Your mind will revolt if you are too severe with yourself. 
    • You'll also observe where energy is being squandered if you're aware. 

    You can become conscious of negative thoughts and learn to stop them if you have a tendency of worrying or thinking negatively. 


    • The most common reason of absence is stress (not turning up to work). 
    • Because you're more likely to remain healthy and be able to work in the first place, mindfulness is one method to manage your stress levels and therefore increase productivity. (Perhaps it isn't such a good thing!) 


    When you're attentive, your job becomes more pleasant, and when you're enjoying something, you're more creative and productive. 


    • You can be interested about whatever you do if you educate your mind to be curious about experience rather than bored. 
    • After a while, you'll realize that work flows through you rather than through you performing the job. 
    • You're either feeding the kids or giving that presentation. 
    • You feel more comfortable and at peace as you lose the sensation of ‘me' doing this. 
    • When this occurs, work becomes easy, frequently of very high quality, and completely pleasant - which, don't you think, sounds like a wonderful sort of productivity?


    You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.



    Mindfulness - Being Able To Relax More



    Being mindful may be a really soothing experience. 

    You may begin to feel calmer when you learn to relax with awareness of your breathing or the noises around you. 


    The goal of mindfulness, on the other hand, is not relaxation. 

    One of the pleasant by-products is relaxation. 


    • Mindfulness is the practice of cultivating a feeling of compassion, curiosity, and acceptance toward one's inner and outside experiences, whatever they may be. 
    • When you practice mindfulness, you may or may not experience extremely profound levels of calm. 
    • If you don't, it doesn't necessarily imply you're not practicing mindfulness properly. 
    • All you need is a little perseverance. 


    Why is it that the goal of mindfulness isn't relaxation? 


    • For the next several minutes, try to be completely calm. 
    • What if you're unable to unwind? If you want to relax, you'll either succeed or fail. 
    • If you feel like you're failing, you'll get more uptight and worried, which is the last thing you want. 
    • You can't fail at mindfulness since you don't have any prior experience to draw on. 
    • You just practice paying attention as best you can to whatever your experience is, and whatever occurs happens. 


    As a result of your experience, you acquire a better knowledge. 

    Mindfulness is a highly forgiving state of mind!


    You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.



    Mindfulness - Creating A Healing Environment



    It may be a difficult moment when you are suffering from a physical ailment. 

    It's possible that your illness is unpleasant or even life-threatening. 

    Perhaps your disease has left you unable to do basic tasks that you once took for granted, such as running up the stairs or caring for yourself alone. 

    Illness has the ability to shake you to your core. 


    What are your options for dealing with this? 


    How can you develop inner strength to cope with the changes that occur without being overwhelmed and giving up hope? 


    • High amounts of stress, especially over a lengthy period of time, have been proven to deplete the immune system's power. 
    • Perhaps you caught the illness after a stressful time. 
    • According to research, caregivers who are under a lot of stress for a long time have a poorer immune system when it comes to illnesses like the flu. 
    • Because mindfulness lowers stress, it is a useful tool for coping with sickness. 
    • Reduced stress improves the efficiency of your immune system, which may assist speed up the recovery process from an illness, particularly if the disease is stress-related.
    • Mindfulness may help you feel better by reducing stress, worry, pain, and sadness, as well as increasing your energy, creativity, relationship quality, and general feeling of well-being. 

    The more mindfulness you practice, the better: 

    Monks who have practiced mindfulness their whole lives have levels of happiness in their brains that are much above what science believed was possible.


    You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.



    Mindfulness - What Is Mindfulness Meditation?



    Here's quick a look at Mindfulness Meditation:


    • Mindfulness meditation is a form of meditation that has undergone extensive study and testing in therapeutic settings. 
    • Meditation isn't about meditating on nothing. 
    • Meditation is devoting systematic attention to anything you want to concentrate on, which may involve being aware of your thoughts. 
    • You may uncover your thoughts' regular patterns by listening to them. 
    • Being more conscious of your thoughts is beneficial since they have a significant effect on your emotions and choices. 


    During mindfulness meditation, you usually concentrate on one or more of the following: 


      1. The sensation of your own breathing 
      2. Any of your senses 
      3. Your body 
      4. Your thoughts 
      5. Your emotions 
      6. Whatever is now occupying your attention.


    There are two kinds of mindfulness meditation: 


    1. Formal meditation is a kind of meditation that takes place in a controlled environment. 


      • This is a kind of meditation in which you take time out of your day to practice meditation. 
      • Time out allows you to develop your mindfulness practice and get a better understanding of your mind, its habitual tendencies, and how to stay mindful for a long length of time while being compassionate and curious about yourself and your experience. 
      • Formal meditation is a kind of mental conditioning. 


    2. Meditation in a non-formal setting. 


      • This is when you get into a concentrated and meditative state of mind while doing things like cooking, cleaning, going to work, chatting to a friend, driving, or anything else. 
      • Consider it regular attentiveness. 
      • As a result, you'll continue to improve your mindfulness skills and teach your mind to remain in the present moment rather than drifting off into the past or future. 
      • You may relax in a mindful awareness at any time of day, whatever you're doing, using informal mindfulness meditation. 

    I don't mean a rehearsal when I say "practice" in the context of meditation. 

    To practice meditation, it is to participate in the meditation exercise - not to practice in the sense of attempting to master it one day. 


    You don't have to evaluate or improve your meditation in any way. 

    Your experience is unique to you.


    You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.



    Mindfulness - What It Is And What It Isn't



    Mindfulness is an old concept that may be found in both Eastern and Western cultures. 

    The ancient Indian term Sati, which denotes awareness, attention, and remembering, is translated as mindfulness. 


    1. Awareness. 

    • This is a feature of being human that allows you to be aware of your surroundings. Nothing would exist for you if you were not aware. 

    2. Attention. 

    • Mindfulness training improves your capacity to shift and maintain your attention anywhere and however you choose. 

    3. Remembering. 

    • Remembering to pay attention to your experience from moment to moment is an important component of mindfulness. 


    It's easy to forget to be attentive. The words re'again' and memorari'be aware of' are derived from the Latin re'again' and memorari'be mindful of'. 


    • Let's say you want to learn to be more attentive to help you deal with stress. 
    • You start to feel anxious and nervous at work as you think about your upcoming presentation. 
    • You remember to concentrate your attentive attention on your own breathing rather than continuously fretting once you become aware of this. 
    • Slowly calming yourself down by feeling your breath with a sense of warmth and kindness. 

     ‘Mindfulness may be fostered by paying attention in a particular manner, that is, in the present moment, as non-reactively, non-judgmentally, and openheartedly as possible,' says Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn, who created mindfulness in a therapeutic context. 



    You may deconstruct the meaning even more: 


      • I'm paying attention to what's going on. 
      • To be aware, you must pay attention to whatever it is that you choose to focus on. 
      • Now is the time. 

    The truth of being in the here and now is that all you have to do is be aware of how things are right now. 

      • Your own experience is genuine and accurate in its whole. 
      • In a non-reactive manner. 
      • Normally, when you encounter something, you respond to it instinctively based on your previous training. 
      • If you think, "I still haven't completed my job," you will respond in some way with thoughts, words, and actions. 
      • Instead of reacting to ideas, mindfulness encourages you to respond to your experience. 

     

    A reaction is uncontrollable and leaves you with no option; a response is intentional and deliberated action. 

      • In a nonjudgmental manner. 
      • It's easy to categorize experiences as positive or negative, as something you enjoy or hate. 
      • I want to be happy; I don't enjoy being scared. 

     

    Allowing yourself to let go of judgments allows you to view things as they are rather than through the lens of your own particular judgments based on previous training. 

      • With all of my heart. 
      • Mindfulness is more than a state of consciousness. 
      • Mindfulness is also a matter of the heart. 

     

    Being open-hearted means infusing your experience with qualities such as kindness, compassion, warmth, and friendliness. 


    If you catch yourself thinking, "I'm worthless at meditation," you may learn to let go of this critical thought and gently return your attention to the meditation's objective, whatever that may be.


    You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.



    What Is Mindfulness? In A Nutshell!


    mindfulness concept, mindful living mindfulness concept, mindful living, text written on the sand of beach mindfulness stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images


    Mindfulness is filled with characteristics such as attentiveness, compassion, curiosity, purpose, and acceptance. 


    At this given instance of time, being aware teaches you how to appreciate the current moment rather than dwelling on the past or worrying about the future. 


    • The past is no longer relevant and cannot be altered. 
    • The future has yet to come and is unknowable. 
    • In the end, the current now, this exact instant, is the only moment you have. 


    Mindfulness teaches you how to live in the present moment in a peaceful manner. 


    • You discover how to make the present moment - the only location where you may create, decide, listen, think, grin, act, or live – a more beautiful place to be in. 
    • Awareness and mindfulness meditation, may last anywhere from a few minutes to as long as you choose, can help you build and further deepen the degree of your mindfulness. 


    You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation here.


    7 Step Mindfulness Physical Sensations Exercise

     


    Whether it's a chair, the ground, your bed, or the air surrounding you, your body is always in contact with something. This is a fantastic approach to tune in to your current situation. 

    You can be aware of these places of touch at any moment, whether in meditation or in your regular life. 

    Because the feelings are often easy to detect, this is an excellent practice for beginners. 

    “Mindfulness is the acceptance of the present moment with awareness and balance. It doesn't get much more straightforward than that. It is accepting or opening to the present moment, pleasurable or unpleasant, precisely as it is, without clinging to it or rejecting it.” ~ SYLVIA BOORSTEIN


    Instructions


    1. This exercise may be done in any posture, however I recommend doing it while sitting. Close your eyes and focus your attention on your body's posture. Make whatever modest modifications necessary to put your body at peace. 
    2. Begin by observing the areas of the body that are in contact with anything else. Can you feel your feet making touch with the ground? Pay attention to the sensations in your feet. There isn't anything exciting to do. Simply pay attention to how your feet are feeling right now. 
    3. Continue until you can feel your back end making contact with the chair or cushion. Take note of the upper thighs' touch and pressure with the chair. Rest your consciousness here, paying attention to how this feels in your body. 
    4. Bring your focus to your hands, wherever they may be. Feel the locations where your hands are contacting, where you're sitting on your lap, or where your knees are resting. Concentrate on the part of the hand that is making touch with something else. 
    5. Now look for places on your body where you can feel the feeling of the garments. You can run your hand over your body to see whether this sensation is present. The locations where the garment ends and the skin is exposed, such as the arms, neck, and ankles, may be the easiest to feel. 
    6. Finally, pay attention to the feel of air against your skin. You may notice that the temperature of the air on the palm of your hand differs from the temperature on the back of your hand. If you're sitting outside, you could notice the breeze. There is no such thing as right or wrong. Don't be afraid to speak from your personal experience. 
    7. Bring attention to the places of touch throughout the day once you've completed this practice. Feel your body come into touch with the chair whenever you sit down. When you stand up, take note of where your feet are on the ground. 



    DEALING WITH OVERWHELMED FEELINGS 


    When you first start exploring body awareness, you may realize that multiple sensations are vying for your attention at the same time. 

    Try utilizing a mental note or a short phrase while monitoring a certain part of your body to help keep your attention focused. 

    • Consider the phrase "feet. feet. feet" while tuning in to the feet. 
    • Alternatively, if you believe a command would be more effective (which it often is), try “feel my feet. feel my feet. feel my feet.” 
    • Link your inhales and exhales to the rhythm of the words. Congratulations on your achievement! It's as easy as that. You're chanting mantras.


    You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation and Healing here.





    Mindfulness of Breath and Body



    Finding the Breath in Your Body is a direct experience. When people strive to become more conscious of their breathing, they may picture or picture it. They may also be thinking about their breath. They even say to themselves from time to time: Hey, I'm breathing, see, I'm breathing in, that was a long breath, now I'm breathing out... 

    None of these strategies will help you stay focused on the breath (although mental labeling might assist.

    Feeling the breath is the key to awareness in breathing exercise. It's crucial to keep your breathing practice from becoming conceptual or cerebral. 


    Mindfulness allows you to connect directly to an experience rather than getting caught in its notion. Breath is a bodily sense that may be immediately felt, rather than a notion. 

    • You may think a lot about breath—for example, when you take the time to learn about the science of breathing and breath regulation—but mindfulness requires you to let go of the notions and focus on the "felt sense"—how you actually feel your breath. 
    • This relaxes your cognitive functioning and helps you to learn on a more intuitive level. 
    • After reading this, close your eyes and simply feel your breath in your body to get the felt feeling. 

    You can find yourself focusing on one region, or you could notice that your breath is felt throughout your entire body, in moving portions of your body, or in specific places of your body, such as your belly button or nose. Wavelike sensations or little ripples of movement may be felt in various parts of your body. This is when you feel your breath rather than thinking about it. 


    You can examine some of those particular regions since you may observe your breathing in a number of places in your body. 


    Concentrate your physical and sensory focus on your abdomen. 

    • Put your hand on your abdomen to get a better sense of it. 
    • Are you able to breathe without needing to do anything? 
    • Your stomach is swaying back and forth. 


    Take a minute to notice any feelings in your abdomen, then return. 

    What did you pick up on? 

    • We're guessing you had a rising and falling experience, an expanding sensation, inflation and deflation sensations, and maybe a contraction in the conclusion. 
    • Perhaps a little moment of silence before the next breath began. 
    • Not what you're envisioning or thinking about the breath, but what you're feeling—the felt sense—is what you're striving to become aware of. 


    Another place to pay attention to your breath is in your chest and neck.

    Take a few deep breaths in your chest. 

    • What are your thoughts? It's most likely something similar to your abdominal breathing, but a little more widespread. 
    • Do you feel your shoulders heaving slightly when you engage in the action? Remember that everyone's experience with mindfulness will be different, therefore you can't feel the breath wrongly. 


    Now pay attention to your nostrils: 


    Close your eyes and take a few deep breaths through your nostrils. 

    What do you think you've noticed? 

    • As the air rushes in and out, you could get a sense of cold or warmth. Maybe you're getting a tickle on the top of your lip. Perhaps you're aware of a little movement in your nose. 
    • Finally, as your mindfulness meditation practice progresses, you'll want to identify one area to focus on that will serve as your own personal anchor. 
    • Although your breath is your anchor, it might be beneficial to focus your attention on a specific place of your body where you feel your breath. 
    • Choose your belly, chest, or nose as your anchor for sensing the breath once you've investigated these three distinct anchor sites.

    Select a location depending on what is most obvious, simplest, or most fascinating to you. If you're having trouble deciding, simply select one—they'll all function just as well. What matters is that you are at ease in your surroundings. 

    Alternatively, some people may feel the breath most vividly as it moves through their entire body, which can also serve as a general anchor. 

    It may take some time to find your place, so try out a few different ones at the start of your meditation practice until you find one that works for you.


    You may also want to read more about Mindfulness Meditation and Healing here.