Showing posts with label Jnaneshvar. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Jnaneshvar. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Was Muktibai?

 

Muktibai (1279–1297?)  was a poet and saint of the Varkari Panth, a religious group focused on the worship of the Hindu deity Vithoba at his temple in Pandharpur, Maharashtra today.

Muktibai was the sister of Jnaneshvar, the renowned Varkari instructor, according to legend.


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Hinduism - What Is The Jnaneshvari?

 

The Bhagavad Gita, one of the most influential Hindu holy books, is the subject of a Marathi-language commentary.

The Jnaneshvari was written by Maharashtrian poet-saint Jnaneshvar, whose goals in authoring it were to make the Bhagavad Gita accessible to those who couldn't read it in its original Sanskrit form and to provide his own scholarly interpretation of the text's contents.

This emphasis on allowing ordinary people full access to religious life was a recurring theme in the (devotional) bhakti movement, and Jnaneshvar, like many other figures, is said to have faced significant opposition from brahmin priests who believed that such advanced teachings should not be revealed to the general public.

 


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Hinduism - Who Is Jnaneshvar?


 (1275–1296?) Poet and saint who founded the Varkari Panth, a religious order focused on the worship of the Hindu deity Vithoba at his temple at Pandharpur, Maharashtra, in the present state of Maharashtra.

Jnaneshvar was an outcaste brahmin, according to legend.

Because his father was a lapsed ascetic—he left his wife to become an ascetic, only to return to his family at his guru's command—he received this punishment.

Jnaneshvar hailed from a devout family: his sister Muktibai is a Varkari deity in her own right, and his older brother Nivrttinath is said to be a "spiritual grandchild" of the legendary ascetic Gorakhnath.

Jnaneshvar spent most of his life in Alandi, according to Varkari legend, although the veracity of many of the events connected with his life is disputed—for example, he is believed to have had a buffalo recite the holy scripture known as the Veda in order to humble the local brahmin priests' pride.

The Jnaneshvari, a Marathi language commentary on the Bhagavad Gita, one of the most significant Hindu holy books, was Jnaneshvar's most famous work.

He's also known for his Vithoba adoration songs, which the Varkaris still sing today.

G. A. Deleury, The Cult of Vithoba, 1960; Justin Abbott and Narhar R. Godbole (trans. ), Stories of Indian Saints, 1982; and G. A. Deleury, The Cult of Vithoba, 1960.

 


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.