Showing posts with label Hindu Temple Architecture. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Hindu Temple Architecture. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is A Kirtimukha?


 ("glory mask") A kirtimukha is a decorative motif in Indian architecture that depicts a devouring leonine beast.

It is often used as a decorative feature on temple towers or as a protective element above gateways. 


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Hinduism - Where Is The Jagamohan Temple Located?


The jagamohan is the entry porch to the temple in Orissa temple architecture, which is one of the principal styles of the northern Indian Nagara style.

It serves as a transitional area between the outer world and the holy space farther in.

The jagamohan, or major interior space, of Orissan temples tended to be low and squat, in stark contrast to the deul, or main internal area, a beehive-shaped tower under which the temple's chief god image dwelt. 


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Hinduism - What Is A Gopuram In Hindu Temple Architecture?


Gopurams are magnificent temple entrances in the middle of the temple's outer walls in the Dravida style of temple architecture, which was mostly dominant in southern India.

Temples created in the Dravida style are typically shorter than temples erected in the northern Indian Nagara style, but they make up for it by sprawling over large areas and establishing cities in their own right.

There are normally four gopurams, one for each of the cardinal directions; in some instances, these gopurams are 10 storeys tall and visible from miles away.

The gopurams were originally designed as defensive entrances to limit entry to the temple, but they now serve a more aesthetic purpose.

Gopurams make a statement about the authority of the resident deities (and their client kings) by dominating the skyline surrounding the temple, much like the spires of Gothic cathedrals; they have also served to educate the devout, since they are generally adorned with sculptures depicting mythical subjects. 


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Hinduism - What Is A Garbhagrha In Hindu Temple Arch itecture?


 (“womb-house”) The garbhagrha is the inner sanctuary of a temple in traditional Hindu architecture, which houses the image of the temple's principal deity.

The garbhagrha was positioned just below the peak of the tallest tower of the Nagara architectural style common in northern and eastern India, in which the whole temple edifice culmiinates in one highest point (shikhara).

The garbhagrha's position is identified by a tower taller than the rest of the roof in the Dravida style seen in southern India—in which temples are shorter but tend to spread over wide distances.

 

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Hinduism And Hindu Theology - Hindu Temple Architecture



In India, Hindu temple architecture has evolved into many unique, mature forms throughout time. 



  • Early Buddhist architectural features, such as the rock-cut cave temple (chaitya) or enclosed courtyard, are used in the early stages (vihara). 


  • Ellora and Elephanta are examples of early Hindu rock-cut temples; others, such as Aihole, are free-standing but based on this style. 


  • Nagara, Dravida, and Veshara are the three main forms of later Hindu architecture, with the first two being the most significant. 

  • Each of these styles is exclusive to a region of India: 

    • Nagara in the north and east, 


    • Dravida in the south, 


    • and Veshara in the west and Deccan. 



The fundamental distinctions between them may be boiled down to the various temple tower styles. 

  • The Nagara style places a strong emphasis on verticality, with the temple's whole structure culminating in a single highest point. 


Different focuses in the treatment of the tower resulted in several substyles: 



  • The whole construction gradually leads up to the central tower of Khajuraho temples, while the Orissa style emphasizes a single massive tower surrounded by many smaller subsidiary sections. 
  • The towers of the Dravida style are usually made out of horizontal tiers, with the focus on horizontal rather than vertical. 
  • The gopurams, or central gates in the temple walls, are the highest constructions of the later Dravida temples. 
  • Although a Dravida-style temple may feature a small tower above the primary shrine, the temple's territory is frequently vast, and many of them are cities in their own right. 
  • The Veshara design has a barrel roof above the sanctuary, which has its origins in Buddhist chaityas (rock-cut cave temples). 
  • The Nagara towers and the Dravida tiers are both represented in this architectural style.




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