Showing posts with label VAJRASANA. Show all posts
Showing posts with label VAJRASANA. Show all posts

What Is Vajra Asana?



The thunderbolt of lndra is Vajra. lndra is Lord of the Heavens in Indian mythology. 

The sciatic nerve is known as Vajra Nadi in Ayurveda, our ancient medicinal discipline of wellness. 

The Vajra Asana impacts a wide number of nerves that originate in the lower lumbar region of the spine and travel through the buttocks, back of the thigh, calf of the leg, and foot. Sciatica is a painful ailment that lends Indra's thunderbolt a bad connotation. 

Vajra can alternatively be interpreted as a diamond, which refers to the triangular position of the body in this example. The triangle can also symbolize the pelvis or sacrum of the spine, as both are greatly influenced by this excellent Asana. 

Because of the strength of this viewpoint, the term "adamantine" is frequently employed. 

The Adamant Pose also has the connotations of unyielding and steadfast. 

  • If the shoulders are maintained upright when in the ideal sitting position, the posture has a positive influence on the lower back and can also benefit the mid and upper back. 
  • A consistent usage of this position corrects both lordosis, an excessively forward, convex curvature of the lumbar region, and scolosis, a lateral curvature of the spine. 
  • Spondylitis, or Pott's disease, is also treated. Spondylitis is a kind of spinal caries that causes the bones of the spine to pit and become honey-comb-like. 
  • It was once known as spinal tuberculosis. The usage of this position greatly improves circulation to the buttocks, backs of the thighs, behind the knees, and into the calves of the legs. 

Even the most severe instances of varicose veins can be treated with Vajra asana. Varicose or dilated veins occur when the valves of the blood vessels become ineffective, preventing blood flow from returning to the afflicted body region. 

The backs of the lower limbs, as well as the rectum in the case of haemorrhoids or pies, are the most usually affected areas. 

A uncommon ailment that affects the lower oesophagus would not be considered a benefit for this disease. 


  • If your legs weary when sitting in Vajra Asana or your calve muscles cramp due to the "newness" of the sitting position, get up onto your knees every few seconds and "re-sit." 
  • If a cramp continues, sit down and "thump the thighs" on the mat until circulation improves and you may re-practice the posture. 
  • Attempt to sit for thirty seconds at first, then one minute, then two to three minutes, and so on. Don't put too much pressure on yourself. 

Take your time, and nature will assist you. 

Where do I begin? "How do I begin?" 

That is the first question that comes to mind when preparing to begin a Yoga practice. Some people recommend starting with meditation, while others recommend doing Asanas (warm-up postures) and exercising. 

This inquiry, like all good inquiries, should be followed up by another, "Where did life begin?" 

The answer to both of our inquiries is "with the breath of life." Our Yoga should continue with breathing exercises that will eventually take us to traditional Pranayama. 

At its most basic level, Pranayama is just moving air in and out of the body, or Vayu-yama. 

Pranayama is a higher kind of regulated breathing that brings the Divine Lif e Force, symbolized by the Prana, under control. 

The first Pranayama to learn is a simple, uncomplicated method of breath inhalation and exhalation that is engaged, deep, and regular. 

Sukha Pranayama is a type of breathing exercise that is best done while sitting in Vajra Asana. 

Sukha means "pleasant," and this breath should always be treated with a positive sense of delight, especially if the breath is deep or Dirgha, which sends powerful reflexogenic feedback signals to the brain informing the "respiratory center" that Pranayama is being practiced.


You may also want to read more about Yoga here.

You may also want to read more about Yoga Asanas and Exercises here.



VAJRASANA - THE ADAMANTINE POSE

 




The person sitting in this Asana has a very calm and firm posture. They are unable to be quickly shook.

The legs get very stiff. Merudanda grows firm and strong. This Asana resembles the Namaz posture in which Muslims sit for prayer in several ways.

Place the soles of the foot on both sides of the anus, i.e., one over the other, the thighs on the hips, and the soles on the buttocks. 

The calves must be in contact with the legs. The ground can be reached from the toe to the knee. The knees and ankles bear the whole weight of the body. 

A mild pain in the knee and ankle joints may occur at the start of practice, but it will subside quickly. Using your fingertips, massage the sore areas and two joints. Rub with a small amount of Iodex or Amrutanjan. 

Place all hands straight on the elbows after the feet and knees have been fixed. Have your legs tucked together. Sit in this position, holding your trunk, neck, and head in a single line.

ADVANTAGES


The meal will be well digested if you sit in this Asana for fifteen minutes after eating. 

Dyspeptics will profit greatly. Legs and thighs Nadis, nerves, and muscles are reinforced. 

Myalgia disappears in the knees, legs, toes, and thighs. Sciatica is no longer a problem. 

Flatulence is no longer a problem. Stomach has a calming and beneficial effect on Kanda, the most important part of the body from which all the Nadis emerge.