Showing posts with label Hindus. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Hindus. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Was Vijnaneshvara?

 

Vijnaneshvara is a Hindu (12th c.) Author of the Mitakshara, a lengthy commentary on the Yajnavalkya Smrti, which is itself a work of dharma literature, or religious obligation books.

This specific piece of criticism was crucial to the British administration of India.

The British were mostly content to have traditional religious laws govern their Indian subjects, but they needed a standard to do so.

The Mitakshara was given the status of traditional law and was used as a legal code in large parts of British India.

Bengal, where the Dayabhaga was the legal authority, was the only major part of India where Hindus were not subject to this.

One of the major differences between the two was in matters of inheritance.

The Mitakshara stresses inheritance by survivorship, in which only living males can inherit property, whereas the Dayabhaga stresses inheritance by succession, in which a dead man’s heirs can inherit in his name.


~Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - What Is The Process Of Reconversion In Hinduism?

 


The process through which persons who have changed to other religious traditions are re-accepted as Hindus.

Shuddhi is another word for Reconversion.


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Hinduism - Where Is The Kailas Mountain? Are There Present Restrictions On Pilgrims?


 A Himalayan mountain in southern Tibet that is revered by both Hindus and Buddhists as a pilgrimage site (tirtha).

Kailas is said to be Mount Meru, the universe's core, according to Hindu mythology.

The peak of Mount Kailas is also said to be where the deity Shiva resides.

The essential act of pilgrimage to Kailas for both Hindus and Buddhists is to walk around the mountain, metaphorically crossing the whole globe.

The trek starts at Manasarovar, a lake at the mountain's foot that is known as the Lake of the Gods in Hindu mythology.

The sixty-five-mile circuit is exceedingly challenging due to a number of factors: Even in June (the traditional pilgrimage month), the region is exceedingly isolated, the temperature is harsh and unforgiving, and the circuit itself is physically demanding, with its highest point over 19,000 feet above sea level.

Storms may strike at any time of year, and unprepared pilgrims might quickly perish from exposure.

Given these challenges, only a small percentage of individuals undertake this pilgrimage; nonetheless, those who do are rewarded.

For long years, Chinese travel restrictions in Tibet prevented anyone from making this journey.

These prohibitions have been lifted since the early 1990s, and small groups of religious pilgrims are once again undertaking the hallowed pilgrimage. 


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.