KIRAN ATMA: Pancha Niyama
Showing posts with label Pancha Niyama. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Pancha Niyama. Show all posts

Yoga And Yoga Asanas - What Is Pancha Niyama?



    The five stages of the Pancha Yania, or moral restrictions are required to merely maintain the human birth to which we have achieved in this incarnation. 


    • It is devolutionary and harmful to give in to one's animal instincts and lower nature. 
    • Man has progressed from animal to human, yet he is not yet "too" human. 

    Saucha, Santosha, Tapas, Swadhyaya, and Atman Pranidhana are among the Pancha Niyama, or ethical observances, required to progress from a human to a more compassionate and possibly divine condition. 



    1.Saucha


    Saucha refers to both outward and interior cleanliness. Cleanliness is second only to Godliness, but it must also include emotional and mental cleanliness. 


    • Get rid of any bad feelings. Cleanse a soiled mind. 
    • Allow the winds of the Supreme Breath to sweep through your mind, clearing the cobwebs of preconceived notions and prejudice. 
    • Encourage freedom of speech from people around you, especially members of the opposition, to reduce this. 
    • Allow a new light to enter the mind, as well as the fresh air of new ideas. 



    2.Santosha


    Santosha is mental tranquillity, with a quiet mind as though in the eye of a storm. 


    • You may be caught up in a tornado of activity and a storm of emotions, but you must find your way to the stillness of the Self. 
    • Discover that peace exists in the midst of confusion, just as it does in the midst of darkness—light, in the midst of death—life, and in the midst of untruth—truth.
    • Learn the slow moving action of the calm mind to free yourself from the storm, so you can spend time with others unhurriedly, especially when such relationships are important. 
    • In the midst of a hectic day, it's rare to develop understanding and calmness in personal and interpersonal circumstances. 
    • Allow for a lot of quiet to allow for intra-personal dialogue. Be still and know what you're doing! 



    3. Tapas


    Tapas must be seen as a way of life that is disciplined. It implies timeliness and regularity in practice for the Yogi, as well as the capacity to live in the "now and here." 


    • Tapas also represents discipline that allows you to deal with others with a willingness to adjust, where necessary, your own views and feelings, thus bringing about understanding. 
    • It may also involve other aspects of Yoga practice, so excellent for self-discipline and self-awareness. 
    • Tapas also represents discipline that allows you to deal with others with a willingness to adjust, where necessary, your own views and feelings, thus bringing about understanding. 
    • Discipline yourself so that you can discover areas of common interest and agreement, and if feasible, include these points into external activity programs, so that your Tapas becomes a kind of Karma Yoga, or disciplined service to others. 



    4. Swadhyaya


    Swadhyaya is Sanskrit for "self-analysis." self-reflection, self-awareness "Man, know yourself" is an old adage that even the most earnest seeker sometimes forgets. A person who lacks self-awareness will never be able to achieve true spiritual oneness. 


    • Look inside, search within, don't turn inward in the sense of being introverted, rather than introvert. 
    • Seek knowledge of the Self, which may set you free from ego, or non-Self, illusions and delusions. 
    • Knowing yourself allows you to select a life purpose in both the outward realm of action and the inner levels. 
    • It is possible to develop a personal philosophy or a highly personalized religious concept by getting to know yourself. 
    • True humility is only possible when one's whole essence is brought into spiritual harmony. 
    • Patience and even self-devotion are required to understand oneself. 
    • Seeing beauty and love in its purest form will assist in revealing the inner life of beauty and happiness. 


    5. Atman Pranidhana


    Iswara Pranidhana, or attention to God, is another name for Atman Pranidhana, but I believe it implies learning to understand the voice of the Inner Reality. 


    • The Atman, or True Nature. The word "Iswara," which means "God," has just recently been introduced into this devotion. 
    • Pay attention to the Voice in the Silence. It must be obeyed immediately and without reservation.


    You may also want to read more about Yoga here.

    You may also want to read more about Yoga Asanas and Exercises here.