Showing posts with label Gudimallam Linga. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Gudimallam Linga. Show all posts

Hinduism - Where Is The Lingaraja Temple In India?


The Gudimallam linga, the earliest known depiction of Shiva in this form, depicts him as both male and female, transcending the most fundamental defining characteristic of human identity.

The most prominent and largest of the temples in Bhubaneshvar, dedicated to the deity Shiva as Tribhuvaneshvar, the "Lord of the Three Worlds." The temple was constructed in the eleventh century C.E., and it represents the pinnacle of the Nagara architectural style's Orissan branch.

With shorter auxiliary structures running up to it, the temple construction culminates in a single, high peak point above the image of the temple's major deity.

The Lingaraja temple has all of the components of Orissan architecture, including a 120-foot-high beehive-shaped tower (deul), a dancing hall (natamandira), an entry hall (jagamohan), and an outside entrance hall (bhogamandapa).


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Hinduism - What Is A Gudimallam Linga?

 

A specific linga, or symbolic representation of the deity Shiva.

It is dated to the second century B.C.E.and is likely the earliest Hindu picture still in existence.

It is called after the hamlet of Gudimallam, which is located in the south-eastern part of the state of Andhra Pradesh, close to the Tamil Nadu border.

Despite its antiquity, the linga is still revered and worshipped in its original temple.

The linga itself is a five-foot polished stone pilar with a four-foot-high Shiva sculpture on the front side.

The sculptural piece is very intricate and has some unexpected characteristics.

Shiva's hair, rather of being matted, is weaved into a turban-like form.

Shiva has just two arms, as opposed to the several arms shown in subsequent paintings.

He is holding a ram rather than a deer, which is the only sculpture in which a ram occurs.

Finally, there is no holy thread (yajnopavit) on Shiva's form, which became popular later.

The linga is especially famous for the intricate craftsmanship at the pillar's top, which is designed to resemble the head of an erect penis.

This is also different from subsequent iconography, in which the linga's top is usually smoothed down.

The object's shape is unmistakably phallic, despite the fact that linga worship should be taken symbolically as a honor to the force underlying the world.

 


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.