Showing posts with label Ramayana. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Ramayana. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Is Surasa In Hindu Mythology?

 

Surasa is the mother of all the Nagas, a class of lesser divinities who take the shape of serpents in Hindu mythology.

Surasa assumes the shape of a monstrous snake in the Ramayana, the older of the two major Indian epics, to test the fortitude of the monkey-god Hanuman, who leaps across the sea to Lanka in quest of Sita, the deity Rama's kidnapped wife.

Surasa informs Hanuman that no one can pass through her mouth without going through her mouth, and Hanuman responds by becoming bigger and larger.

Surasa's jaws spread wider and wider, and Hanuman shrinks to the point where he darts in and out of her mouth.

Surasa, impressed by Hanuman's cleverness and bravery, bestows her blessing on him.


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Hinduism - Who IS Rishyashringa In Hindu Mythology?

 


Rishyashringa  is a sage from the Ramayana, the first of India's two major epics.

Rishyashringa is tasked by King Dasharatha to make a significant sacrifice in order for the king's women to conceive.

A radiant figure comes from the sacrificial fire at the conclusion of Rishyashringa's sacrifice, lays a pot of milk-rice in front of Dasharatha, and tells him to give it to his wives.

Dasharatha distributes the contents amongst his three wives, Kausalya, Kaikeyi, and Sumitra, and they all have sons in due time.

Kausalya is Rama's daughter and the protagonist of the Ramayana.

Bharata's mother is Kaikeyi, while Lakshmana and Shatrughna's mother is Sumitra.


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Hinduism - Who Is Ravana In Hindu Mythology?

 

Ravana is the ten-headed demon ruler of Lanka in the Ramayana, the first of the two major Indian epics.

Vishnu, in his incarnation as Rama, is born to vanquish Ravana.

Ravana is the reincarnation of Vishnu's guardian Jaya, who was cursed by a guru to be reincarnated three times as a demon, each time being destroyed by Vishnu.

Ravana is a rakshasa, a sort of demon with enormous physical strength and a variety of magical abilities.

In Indian culture, rigorous physical asceticism (tapas) is commonly thought to develop spiritual strength and bring boons from the gods, and he uses it to supplement these natural powers.

When the deity Brahma comes and instructs Ravana to pick his boon, Ravana demands that he be able to be slain only by humans.

This effectively makes him immortal, since his abilities are such that no average human will be able to injure, much alone kill him.

Ravana then proceeds to torment the gods, certain that they would be unable to stop him.

He starts with his half-brother Kubera, a lesser god who loses his house and all he has to Ravana.

Ravana's near-invulnerability gets the better of him, and the mighty demon starts to break all moral and ethical conventions.

He has a history of abusing and kidnapping women, which has resulted in a slew of curses from his defenseless victims, many of which prophesy his demise.

Rama's brother Lakshmana mutilates his sister Shurpanakha as a consequence of one of these curses.

Ravana is determined to revenge this insult, and he believes that abducting Rama's wife Sita is the best way to do it.

Ravana steadfastly refuses to listen to his wife Mandodari and brothers, who chastise him for his actions and implore him to return Sita and make peace with Rama.

His inflated pride and desire to revenge his sister's insult deafens him to their advice, and he pays the price for his obstinacy with his life when Rama kills him in combat.

Ravana, like other demons, isn't wholly evil by nature, but he is very strong and imperfect at the same time.

Ravana is said to be a devotee (bhakta) of the deity Shiva, and the Shivatandava Stotra, a hymn to the dancing Shiva, is sometimes credited to him.


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Hinduism - Who Is Raghu In Hindu Mythology?

 

Raghu is the grandfather of Ruler Dasharatha and a renowned king of the Ikshvaku dynasty in Hindu mythology.

Rama, the protagonist of the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Hindu epics, is one of Dasharatha's sons.


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Hinduism - Who Is Lakshmana In Hindu Mythology?


Lakshmana is one of King Dasharatha's sons with his wife Sumitra, and the younger half-brother of Rama, the epic's protagonist, in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics.

Lakshmana is the ideal younger brother throughout the Ramayana, living only to serve and assist Rama.

When Rama is exiled to the forest for fourteen years, Lakshmana follows him like a shadow the whole time, first as a forest ascetic, looking for Rama's stolen wife Sita, then fighting heroically in the battle with Ravana's army, and ultimately returning to serve Rama at his court in Ayodhya.

Many of the Ramayana's characters are archetypes for Indian cultural beliefs.

As with his brother Bharata, Lakshmana represents the perfect younger brother.

Brothers are the center of the joint family in northern India.

Sisters, on the other hand, stay at home after marriage and live with their married families.

Every generation's oldest brother ultimately ascends to the position of joint family leader.

The oldest brother, who has main authority and responsibility for the whole family, cannot thrive without the participation of his younger brothers, who must respect and support his authority.

Lakshmana is a devoted younger brother in his devotion to Rama and his full disregard for his own wants.

Lakshmana is far from faultless, despite his courage, heroism, and complete devotion to Rama.

He lacks Rama's tolerance and discernment, and he acts before he thinks.

When Bharata pursues the two brothers after they have gone into exile, Lakshmana assumes that Bharata is taking advantage of the chance to murder them in order to smooth his path to the throne.

Lakshmana plots to assassinate Bharata, but Rama's logic prevents a disaster.

Shurpanakha, a demon princess and sister of Ravana, Lanka's demon-king, is Lakshmana's most grievous blunder in judgment.

When she makes sexual approaches toward Lakshmana, he mocks her before mutilating her.

Ravana kidnaps Rama's wife, Sita, in order to exact vengeance on the brothers.

Lakshmana, like all the characters in the Ramayana, is neither good nor bad; he has many qualities as well as some serious defects. 


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Hinduism - Who Is Lava In Hindu Mythology?

 


Lava is one of the twin sons of Rama, the epic's protagonist, in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics.

Lava is born in the typical manner after their mother, Sita, is exiled to the ashram of the guru Valmiki.

Valmiki mysteriously creates his sibling, Kusha, out of kusha grass.

Lava and Kusha later accompany Valmiki to Rama's court at Ayodhya.

They first read the epic poem written by Valmiki, the Ramayana, at Rama's court.

Rama splits his kingdom between Lava and Kusha when he relinquishes his reign.


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Hinduism - Who Is Khara In Hindu Mythology?

 


Khara is one of the demon-king Ravana's siblings in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics.

Khara works with his brother Dushana to revenge the dignity of their sister Shurpanakha, who had her ears and nose cut off by Rama's brother Lakshmana.

Rama defeats the demon army in a violent fight, slaying Khara and Dushana.

Shurpanakha seeks revenge against their brother Ravana after seeing her two brothers' defeat.

Ravana believes he won't be able to kill Rama in combat, so he decides to revenge his sister by capturing Sita, which sets the tone for the rest of the epic.

 

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Hinduism - What Is Kishkindha In Hindu Mythology?

 


Kishkindha is a woodland kingdom governed by monkeys in the Ramayana, the first of the two major Indian epics.

When Rama (the epic's protagonist) initially arrives in Kishkindha with his brother Lakshmana in quest of Rama's stolen bride Sita, the monkey-king Bali reigns supreme.

Rama kills Bali, and his brother Sugriva, Rama's friend, succeeds him.

Sugriva sends his people on a broad hunt for Sita.

Hanuman, one of them, ultimately finds her being kept captive on Lanka.


 

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Hinduism - Who Was Kabir?


 (middle of the 15th century?) A poet is considered as one of the most important religious personalities in northern India.

Kabir belonged to the Sants, a group of poet-saints from central and northern India who shared several characteristics: an emphasis on individualized, interior religion leading to a personal experience of the divine; disdain for external ritual, particularly image worship; belief in the power of the divine Name; and a tendency to ignore caste hierarchies.

Kabir was a devout follower of these ideas, and in his works, he openly criticizes any religious practice based on habit or custom, such as asceticism, unique ways of clothing, fasting (upavasa), image worship, caste, and text.

Kabir describes himself as a weaver (julaha) in his poems, and according to legend, he supported himself via this employment.

Kabir's background makes it impossible to associate him with a certain faith.

In Arabic, the name Kabir ("Great") is one of Allah's names in the Qur'an, indicating that he is a Muslim.

His poetry, on the other hand, demonstrates his extensive understanding of Hindu religious life.

The members of Kabir's julaha society were supposed to be new converts to Islam who had not yet completely integrated.

Kabir's poetry, on the other hand, plainly demonstrates that he was neither Hindu nor Muslim.

Kabir's appeal is probably due to his forthright, impassioned assertion that true religious accomplishment can only be attained via inward, individual experiences of the divine, which he refers to as Ram.

This is a word for the incomprehensible, ultimate Supreme Reality, not the god-king who is the hero of the Ramayana.

Both of these emphasizes reflect the Nathpanthi ascetics' influence, who also emphasized inward experience and yoga.

Kabir reportedly claimed in one of his songs that he had never put pen to paper since he was so engaged in the holy.

Many of his shorter epigrams have become conventional sayings, and his songs are still popular today.

Kabir's oldest attested poetry can be found in three major collections: one in the Adigranth, the Sikh scripture also known as the "Primal Book," another compiled by the Dadupanth, the religious organization founded by the Sant poet-saint Dadu, and the Bijak, compiled by the Kabirpanth, a religious community that claimed Kabir as its guru (religious preceptor).

These collections show substantial variances, indicating that they are not all from the same source.

For more information, see Charlotte Vaudeville's Kabir (1974); Linda Hess and Shukdev Singh's The Bijak of Kabir (1983); John S.

Hawley and Mark Juergensmeyer's Songs of the Saints of India (1988); Nirmal Dass' Songs of Kabir from the Adi Granth (1991); and David Lorenzen's Kabir Legends and Ananta-Das' Kabir Parachai (1991). 


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Hinduism - Who Is Kausalya In Hindu Mythology?


Kausalya is the first wife of King Dasharatha and the mother of the god-king Rama in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics. 


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Hinduism - Who Is Janaka In Hindu Mythology?


The goddess Sita's foster father.

He came upon her one day while plowing a farm furrow.

Janaka represents the sage-king in Hindu mythology, a person who, despite his riches and rank, was as dispassionate as any hermit dwelling in the jungle.

 


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Hinduism - Who Is Jambhavan In Hindu Mythology?


Jambhavan is a minister of Sugriva, king of the monkeys, in the Ramayana, the older of the two major Indian epics.

Jambhavan is often characterized as a bear, yet he is also described as a monkey in certain accounts.

Jambhavan persuades the monkey-god Hanuman to undertake a crossing of the ocean to Lanka in the quest for Rama's stolen wife Sita, reminding Hanuman of his birth, actions, and heavenly boons.

Although Hanuman first doubts his abilities, he is persuaded by Jambhavan's encouragement and jumps over the sea to Lanka, where he ultimately discovers Sita.

 


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Hinduism - Who Is Jabali In Hindu Mythology?


In Hindu mythology, Jabali is a prominent sage who is the son of the sage Vishvamitra.

Despite his biological beginnings, Jabali ultimately gets affiliated with the sage Vasishtha, his father's worst adversary.

Jabali joins Vasishtha's party and becomes one of King Dasharatha's counsellors, the father of the god-king Rama in the epic Ramayana. 


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Hinduism - Who Was Ikshvaku Of The Ancient Suryavanshi Kshatriya (Or Solar Warrior) Lineage?

 


Ikshvaku was a monarch who founded the Solar Line in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics.

The Solar Line, along with the Lunar Line, was one of the two main Indian legendary lineages in ancient India; the god-king Rama and his brothers were the most prominent members of the Solar Line.

Ikshvaku is the grandson of the sun, Vivasvan (Surya), and hence he and his progeny are sun descendants.

 


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Hinduism - What Is Hanuman Jayanti?


Hanuman Jayanti is a Hindu festival commemorating the birth of Lord Hanuman.

Hanuman's birthday is celebrated with a festival.

This is celebrated on the full moon in the lunar month of Chaitra (March–April) in southern India, and on the fourteenth day of the dark (waning) half of the lunar month of Kartik (October–November) in northern India.

The latter date corresponds to Shivaratri, Shiva's most significant festival, which takes place on the fourteenth day of the waning half-month Phalgun (usually in February).

Because Hanuman is often seen as an avatar or "incarnation" of Shiva, who has come to earth to serve the god-king Rama, the two celebrations are linked.

Hanuman is a highly important god in ordinary religious life, with a large following, despite his mythic status as a devoted and powerful servant of Rama.

Although there are no official ceremonies for his birthday, his followers (bhakta) sometimes observe it with worship, celebratory procession, and devotional reading of religious books, notably the Hanuman Chalisa and the Ramayana. 


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