Showing posts with label Vithoba. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Vithoba. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Was Muktibai?

 

Muktibai (1279–1297?)  was a poet and saint of the Varkari Panth, a religious group focused on the worship of the Hindu deity Vithoba at his temple in Pandharpur, Maharashtra today.

Muktibai was the sister of Jnaneshvar, the renowned Varkari instructor, according to legend.


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Hinduism - Who Was Mahipati?

 

Mahipati (1715–1790) was a Hindu ruler who lived from 1715 to 1790.

Mahipati was a writer and hagiographer of devotional (bhakti) poet-saints, particularly those associated with the Varkari Panth, to which he also belonged.

The Varkari Panth is a religious organization dedicated to the worship of the Hindu deity Vithoba, whose temple is located in Pandharpur, Maharashtra.

Mahipati was a government worker in his hometown, according to legend.

He was called to work one day after failing to do his regular worship.

Mahipati completed the task at hand, but then quit, promising to only employ his writing in the service of the saints.

Mahipati readily confessed that he drew a lot of his information about the saints from older writings, notably the Bhaktamal by poet saint Nabhadas.

He depicts each of his themes as a paradigm of devotion, much as Nabhadas did; the tales reaffirm and confirm the ability of dedication to conquer all difficulties.

The Bhaktavijaya and the Bhaktililamrta are his main writings; sections of the former have been translated by Justin E. Abbott as The Life of Eknath, 1981, and The Life of Tukaram, 1980; while the latter has been translated by Justin E. Abbott as Stories of Indian Saints, 1982.


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Hinduism - Where Is Maharashtra In India?

 


Maharashtra is a modern Indian state that stretches from the Arabian Sea to the Deccan Plateau, reaching east through the Western Ghats.

Maharashtra is one of the "linguistic" states established following India's independence in 1947, with the goal of uniting people who share a similar language and culture (in this instance, Marathi) under a single government.

It was established in 1960 when the previous state of Bombay was divided into the current states of Gujarat and Maharashtra.

Bombay, India's capital, is the country's financial and industrial hub.

The western parts are heavily industrialized, whilst the eastern regions are mainly agrarian, with sugar plantations dominating the landscape.

Maharashtra is historically the home of the Marathas, a clan whose eighteenth-century dominion spanned much of northern India.

Maharashtra is home to the Rashtriya Svayamsevak Sangh and the Shiv Sena, two Hindu nationalist groups that have attempted to influence Indian politics.

In addition to its economic and political significance, the state is home to several historical, cultural, and religious attractions.

The rock-cut caverns of Ellora, a UNESCO World Heritage Site; the Buddhist caves of Ajanta; and the cave temple at Elephanta in the Bombay port are among the historical and cultural monuments.

The Godavari and Bhima rivers, as well as their associated sacred sites (tirthas); sites associated with the Varkari Panth religious community, particularly the temple to the god Vithoba at Pandharpur; and three of the jyotirlingas, which are particularly holy to the god Shiva: Bhimashankar, Ghrneshvar, and Tryambakeshvar.

See Christine Nivin et al., India. 8th ed., Lonely Planet, 1998, for general information about Maharashtra and other Indian states.


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Hinduism - Who Is Jnaneshvar?


 (1275–1296?) Poet and saint who founded the Varkari Panth, a religious order focused on the worship of the Hindu deity Vithoba at his temple at Pandharpur, Maharashtra, in the present state of Maharashtra.

Jnaneshvar was an outcaste brahmin, according to legend.

Because his father was a lapsed ascetic—he left his wife to become an ascetic, only to return to his family at his guru's command—he received this punishment.

Jnaneshvar hailed from a devout family: his sister Muktibai is a Varkari deity in her own right, and his older brother Nivrttinath is said to be a "spiritual grandchild" of the legendary ascetic Gorakhnath.

Jnaneshvar spent most of his life in Alandi, according to Varkari legend, although the veracity of many of the events connected with his life is disputed—for example, he is believed to have had a buffalo recite the holy scripture known as the Veda in order to humble the local brahmin priests' pride.

The Jnaneshvari, a Marathi language commentary on the Bhagavad Gita, one of the most significant Hindu holy books, was Jnaneshvar's most famous work.

He's also known for his Vithoba adoration songs, which the Varkaris still sing today.

G. A. Deleury, The Cult of Vithoba, 1960; Justin Abbott and Narhar R. Godbole (trans. ), Stories of Indian Saints, 1982; and G. A. Deleury, The Cult of Vithoba, 1960.

 


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Hinduism - Who Was Gadge Maharaj?

  

 (18 At the Varkari Panth, a religious group focused on the worship of the Hindu deity Vithoba at his temple in Pandharpur in the contemporary state of Maharashtra, modern ascetic instructor and religious preceptor. 

The clay pot (gadge) that was his lone possession gave him his name, representing his rejection of all riches and worldly entanglements. 

Gadge was born into a washerman's caste, which is regarded as a low-status group since their daily labor exposes them to other people's unclean clothing. 

Gadge not only emphasizes the value of devotion to God, which is the characteristic of the bhakti (devotional) movement, but also argues for temperance, poverty, and vegetarianism in his teachings. 



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