Showing posts with label Nirukta. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Nirukta. Show all posts

Hinduism - ACARYA

 



Who Is An Acarya?

A teacher is referred to as Acarya in Sanskrit.

It is derived from acara, 'course,' according to Nirukta 1.4, although Katyayana and maybe also Panini regarded it as 'the one to be approached' (Scharfe 2002: 90f.).

The upanayana in the Veda creates a link between the acarya and the brahmacarin, who resides in the teacher's home (acarya-kula, later called gurukula).

Normally, an acarya had a small number of pupils, although some reports record huge groups, with assisting instructors (Scharfe 2002: 220).

Acarya also refers to a master artisan who instructs a student (Scharfe 2002: 265).

Although the terms guru and acarya are sometimes used interchangeably to refer to the same individual, acarya denotes his authority in his field, whilst guru denotes the respect and adoration owed to him (Hara 1980).

Acarya may be appended to any name, such as Dron-acarya (Drona), Sankaracarya, and so on (Sankara).

Dignaga, a Buddhist logician, is simply known as Acarya by his disciples.

Acarya, or 'minister' in English, is the title given to Brahmo Samaj preachers.


~Kiran Atma


See also: 

Brahmo Samaj, Drona, Guru, Katyayana, Nirukta, Panini, Sankara,Upanayana, Veda


References And Further Reading:

Hara, Minoru. 1980. ‘Hindu Concepts of Teacher: Sanskrit guru and acarya’. In M. Nagaromi, B.K. Matilal, J.M. Masson and E. Dimock, eds, Sanskrit and Buddhist Studies: Essays in Honour of Daniel H.H. Ingalls. Dordrecht: Reidel, 93–118.

Scharfe, Hartmut. 2002. Education in Ancient India. (Handbuch der Orientalistik, Section 2, vol. 16.) Leiden: Brill.


Hinduism - Who Is Yaska?

 



 Yaska (5th century BCE?) is traditionally credited with writing the Nirukta, a Vedic treatise that provides etymological explanations for ancient terms.

Nearly a fourth of the Vedic terms occur just once.

As the spoken language evolved, the meanings of many of these terms had become either ambiguous or altogether forgotten by Yaska's time.

Although it is evident that Yaska is guessing at times—for example, when contemporary linguists may draw parallels with the Iranian Avesta, a comparable religious text—his work proved invaluable to subsequent readers.


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Hinduism - What Is Vyakarana Or Vyaka Vedangas?

 


Vyaka (“analysis”) Vedangas is one of the six Vedangas.

The Vedangas were auxiliary fields of knowledge related with the Vedas, the earliest Hindu sacred books, and all of the Vedangas were linked to the Vedas' usage.

Vyakarana is, at its core, the study of Sanskrit grammar, which was plainly necessary for reading the Vedic writings.

Grammar is the queen of the ancient learned disciplines, and it is what is understood by the word vidya ("knowledge") in many situations, thanks to Vyakarana's status as the gatekeeper of the Sanskrit language.

Other Vedangas include shiksha (proper pronunciation), chandas (Sanskrit prosody), kalpa (ritual instructions), nirukta (etymology), and jyotisha (astrology).


Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - What Are The Vedanga?

 


("A Vedic [subsidiary] member") Six types of writings considered supplementary to the Vedas since they were created to make their usage easier.

These six were shiksha (correct articulation and pronunciation), metrical forms (chandas), Sanskrit grammar (vyakarana), etymological explanations of archaic terms (nirukta), establishing astrologically acceptable sacrificial periods (jyotisha), and ritual and ceremonial guidelines (kalpa).


~Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - What Is Nirukta In Hindu Philosophy?


 (“explanation”) These were the ancillary disciplines of knowledge related to the Vedas, the earliest Hindu holy writings.

Nirukta is interested in the origins of archaic terms and their etymological interpretations.

This seemed to be a severe issue, since about a fourth of the Vedic terms appear just once, and their pre cise meanings became either obscure or unknown over time.

Yaska the grammarian wrote the most renowned nirukta manuscript, known simply as the Nirukta, in the fifth century B.C.E.

His work was very useful to subsequent readers, but it is apparent that the meanings of many of these phrases had grown dubious and ambiguous even in Yaska's day.

Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar), chandas (Sanskrit prosody), kalpa (ritual instructions), shiksha (correct pronunciation), and jyotisha are the other Vedangas (auspicious times for sacrifices).


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