Showing posts with label Mohenjo-Daro. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Mohenjo-Daro. Show all posts

Hinduism - Where Is The Archaeological Site Of Mohenjo-Daro?

 

Archeological site on the Indus River, roughly 200 miles north of Karachi, in contemporary Pakistan.

Mohenjo-Daro is one of the Indus Valley towns, a highly developed urban culture that thrived in the Indus Valley area during the fourth and third millennia BC.

Although archeological work is ongoing in other towns, Harappa and Mohenjo Daro have been the most thoroughly explored.

The similarities between these sites give information about this civilization's material culture.

The "Great Bath," a massive water tank made of brick and sealed with pitch, is one of the attractions of Mohenjo-Daro.

Scholars believe it had something to do with ceremonial purity.



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Hinduism - Where Is Harappa?


Harappa is an ancient city and archeological site in Pakistan, located on the Ravi River approximately 100 miles southwest of the contemporary city of Lahore.

Harappa is one of the cities of the Indus Valley civilization, a highly developed urban culture that flourished in the Indus Valley region between the fourth and third millennia B.C.

Harappa is one of the cities of the Indus Valley civilization, a highly developed urban culture that flourished in the Indus Valley region between the fourth and third millennia B.C.E.

Although archeological work is ongoing in some of the other sites, Harappa and Mohenjo-Daro have been the most thoroughly excavated, and the commonalities between these cities have revealed a great deal about this civilization's material culture. 


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - Where Is Mohenjo-Daro, Bath?



One of the most impressive buildings found at Mohenjo-Daro, the Indus Valley civilization's first metropolis. 



This bath is an oblong pool that measures 39 by 23 feet and is eight feet deep. 


  • It's made of brick and covered with pitch. 
  • The tank was encircled on all four sides by tiny chambers that looked like changing rooms and could be drained via an entrance in one corner. 



The Indus Valley towns placed a high value on plumbing, cleanliness, and sewers, implying that bathing (snana) was associated with ceremonial purity, as it is in contemporary Hindu culture. 





  • With this in mind, the bath was most likely not a bathing pool, but rather had a deeper religious significance. 
  • Walter Ashlin Fairservis, The Roots of Ancient India, 1975, is a good source of knowledge.



You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.