Showing posts with label Ayurvedic Herbs. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Ayurvedic Herbs. Show all posts

Ayurvedic Herbs and their Therapeutic Uses

 


 

Description of a Few Plants Used in Vamana Therapy:



 

Apamarga

The leaves, flowers, seeds, and root of apamarga, also known as the prickly chaff plant, are utilized extensively in pancha karma, with the leaves, flowers, seeds, and root being utilized in emesis treatment. Apamarga, which has a pungent and bitter flavor and a heating effect, is used to treat haemorrhoids, hiccoughs, and stomach ailments.


Arka

This plant, which is also known as sadapushpi and akda in India, and belongs to the caltrops family, is widely employed in pancha karma. Emesis treatment uses the roots, leaves, and flowers of this plant. The plant's "milk" is recognized for its acute strength, and a few drops are occasionally employed as an alkalizer in purgative decoctions. Flowering buds emerge at the base of the leaves and mature into umbrella-shaped blooms. The fruits are white and crimson in hue and have a cottony feel on the inside. Arka is spicy and bitter, with a warming effect. It's used as an emetic and a purgative, as well as to prevent tumors, ulcers, skin illnesses, and stomach problems.

 

Ela

These green or black pods and seeds, often known as cardamom in English, are well-known in both the Vedic cooking and the Ayurvedic medicine. Cardamom is a spice that is fragrant, sweet, pungent, and warming. It's commonly used in pancha karma's nasya, svedana, and vamana treatments, as well as a digestive, heart tonic, and to treat urinary problems.

 

Karanja

This plant, often known as Indian beech in English, is often employed in pancha karma. Karanja has a spicy, bitter flavor and a strong heating effect. Emetic medicine includes the leaves, bark, seeds, and root, which are also used to treat psychological tension, phlegmatic illnesses, parasites from the body, skin illnesses, ulcers, and hemorrhoids.

 

Madana

The fruit of the madana tree, which is native to the Himalayas, is well-known for its wide usage in vamana treatment and has been extensively explored by the renowned Ayurvedic triumvirate of Charaka, Sushruta, and Vagbhatta. There are as many names for this tree as there are Indian languages. It's also known as the emetic nut or bushy gardenia in English. This thorny tree, which grows to be around fifteen feet tall, has huge white and yellow leaves and blooms. Madana phala are kidney-shaped fruits with a sweet, bitter, and astringent flavor. They are picked before they ripen in the spring and summer seasons, wrapped in kush grass, and buried for eight days beneath cow dung, barley grain, mung or urad legumes until the fruit is soft and ripe. After that, they're left to dry in the sun. One seed of the fruit is extracted and mashed with honey and sesame butter in one of Charaka's formulae, madana pippali. After drying, the paste is utilized as an emetic in vamana treatment. Madana is also used to treat skin ailments, abdominal distension, swellings, tumors, ulcers, and to aid in the evacuation of flatus from the body due to its sweet and bitter taste.

 

Madhuka

This creeper, also known as yastimadhu in Sanskrit and licorice in English, is utilized in a variety of Ayurvedic treatments. Its root and bark are employed as a supplemental element in emesis therapy and as the principal herb in purgation therapy, respectively. Licorice, which has a sweet flavor and a cooling effect, is used to treat thirst, toxicity, weariness, nervous tension, and blood diseases.

 

Musta  

The musta weed, also known as nut grass or coco grass, has a wiry rhizome-root structure that produces tiny tubers. This beneficial plant is mistaken for a weed in many places and is exterminated. Musta is used in Ayurveda to treat fevers, restore circulation and menstrual regularity, and stimulate digestion. It has a bitter, pungent, and astringent flavor with a chilly power. It's also used as a diuretic and to treat skin conditions including eczema, burns, and internal bleeding. Musta can also be used as a complement to antiemetic medications.

 

Nimba

The leaves of this large tree, sometimes known as neem, are renowned for their bitterness. Nimba has a bitter and pungent flavor, as well as a cold potency. Ayurveda makes considerable use of both leaves and roots. Emesis treatment, blood illnesses, skin problems, and agni problems are all treated using the leaves. Nimba tree twigs are still used as disposable toothbrushes in India. Neem is an effective treatment for preventing tooth decay and gum disease due to its inherent antibacterial properties. Neem powder may also be used as a pesticide. The neem plant was just brought from India for cultivation in Florida.

 

Pippali

The unripe peppers, also known as long peppers, are picked, and stored to ripen before use. They are endemic to India and Java. Pippali is a key element in Ayurvedic medicine for treating Kapha imbalances. It has a spicy, volatile, and spicy flavor with a strong heating effect. Pippali is a digestive and carminative herb used in Vedic cookery. It is also widely used in Ayurveda to treat spleen issues, asthma, diabetes, and bronchitis. It's also a natural antispasmodic.

 

Sveta bimba

The fruits, leaves, bark, and root of this plant, sometimes known as the ivy gourd in English, are utilized in pancha karma. In India, the ivy gourd is known as bimbi and comes in two flavors: bitter and sweet. Both plants have a cooling effect. The sweet variety's fruit is used to treat blood problems, swellings, anaemia, fevers, and emesis. The bitter variety's fruit is used to treat Kapha diseases such colds, coughs, mucous, and lethargy.

 

Vacha

This branching rhizome, also known as sweet flag, myrtle flag, or calamus, is a perennial noted for its therapeutic applications in Ayurveda. The roots are reddish-brown in color, hairy, and crowded together. Vacha root has an aromatic scent and a bitter, pungent flavor with a warming effect. "Vacha" is a Sanskrit word that signifies "speaking." Vacha is used as a brain tonic and to boost speaking capability, as its name suggests. Vacha is commonly used in emesis and purgation treatment to treat digestive and mental illnesses, as well as heart illness, constipation, uterine issues, and infections.

 

Vidanga

This creeper, also known as embelia or viranga, has white blooms and black berries. The berries are fragrant and warming and are often utilized in Ayurveda. Vidanga is used to treat obesity and phlegmatic illnesses, as well as to promote digestion, strengthen immunity, and remove internal parasites including fungus, yeast, bacteria, and worms. It is also used as an oral contraceptive when mixed with pippali.

 



A Few Plants Used in Virechana Therapy:



 

Badri

Badri is a small evergreen tree with thin scraggly branches and stinging thorns that produces clusters of tiny star-shaped yellow flowers and red oval leaves. It is also known as the jujube tree in English. In ancient times, a grove of these trees high in the Himalayas was chosen as a sacred spot for the saint Narayana, Lord Vishnu's avatar; now, Badrinath, a Hindu pilgrimage destination, is still secluded in the grandeur of this same badri grove. This tree's berries are used to create sherbet and preserves, and the juice is utilized in purgation treatment.

 

Castor (eranda).

The eranda, or castor plant as it is known in English, is an African plant that is now grown in India and many tropical nations. This strongly purgative plant grows as an annual herb as well as a perennial tree and is used to treat a variety of ailments. The castor plant has a sweet, pungent, and warming flavor to it. The seeds and oil are largely used in Ayurvedic medicine for purgative treatment, as well as to treat neurological problems, pain, and heart disease, as well as to eliminate internal parasites. The castor plant's roots are used to treat inflammatory diseases, fever, asthma, and analgia. The leaves are used to treat Kapha problems including asthma, cough, colds, and phlegm. The blossoms are used to treat glandular cancers, while the fruits are utilized to restore appetite and reignite digestive fire.

 

Lotus (kamala).

Kamala is a Sanskrit word that signifies desired, good, or rosy. The lotus, to borrow the English term, is regarded the birthplace of the cosmos in Hindu mythology. It represents the universe's transformation from formlessness to complete splendor. Lord Vishnu floats on the ocean with a lotus flower sprouting from his navel after the universe has disintegrated. The Creator, Brahma, emerges from the lotus and creates the universe. The goddess Lakshmi, Vishnu's spouse, appears standing on a pink lotus, with lotus-eyed eyes and wearing lotus garlands. Lord Vishnu and the goddess Lakshmi, who are often depicted as the sun and the lotus in ancient Vedic mythology, are emblems of the eternal love that binds the entire cosmos together. The lotus plant, which is native to the ponds and lakes of Kashmir, China, and Japan, adorns the waters around India's temples with its magnificent blue, white, pink, and red blossoms. The lotus blossom is regarded as the most beautiful flower on the planet. The lotus bloom is framed by huge waxy leaves that are typically used as disposable plates for meals served at religious events in India. Ayurvedic medicine, particularly pancha karma treatments, uses the roots, flowers, leaves, stamens, and seeds extensively. The lotus is a sweet, astringent, and cooling flower that is used as a nutritional tonic, aphrodisiac, and to soothe nerve illnesses. The seeds can be used as a heart tonic.


Palasha

The palasha tree, also known as the "Flame of the Forest," is considered sacred in India. The dye powders that worshippers of Lord Vishnu and Lord Shiva apply on their foreheads are made from its vivid red and orange parrot-shaped blossoms. Butea monosperma is the Latin name for this tree, named for the Earl of Bute, a patron of botany, and palasha is the Sanskrit word for both beauty and leaf. Many unique and esoteric myths have been told about the palasha tree. According to legend, the palasha tree was born on Earth when a falcon's feather soaked in Soma, the gods' nectar formed from the characteristics of the moon, fell to the ground, and formed the seed for the tree. Pancha karma treatments employ wood, fruit, leaves, flowers, seeds, and bark, whereas earth sveda therapies employ wood, bark, and leaves, and purgation uses fruit, leaves, and seeds. The palasha tree offers the basic material for tanning leathers, which is a red, astringent gum. Lacquer is created by the lac insects that live on the tree and is used in colours and as a sealing wax. In India, its leaves are still used to produce disposable plates and animal feed, and its roots are used to manufacture rope.


Pomegranate (dadima).

Pomegranate, the English name for dadima, is derived from the French term Pomegranate, which means seeded apple. The pomegranate is a sign of fertility and wealth in the Vedas. The Prophet Mohammad is claimed to have encouraged his students to consume this fruit to cleanse their jealousy because of its astringent, sweet, and cooling properties. Pomegranates have long been used to fend off bad spirits, according to legend. Pomegranate trees have reddish orange blossoms with crumpled petals that bloom at the end of their stiff, narrow limbs. Pomegranates are a small bushy tree that comes in both evergreen and deciduous forms. The fruit is the size of giant Macintosh apples and has a hard skin that cracks apart or "laughing" once mature, revealing a cluster of carmine red fleshy seeds, which are the fruit's edible section. Every component of the pomegranate tree is utilized medicinally in Ayurveda. The root bark is used to remove internal parasites, while the fruit is utilized as a blood cleanser and tonic. Pomegranate juice is used for purgation and digestion, while the fruit rind is utilized as an anti-inflammatory for mucous membranes.

  

Sesame seeds (tila).

The Sanskrit term "tila" refers to a little particle, but "sesame" is derived from the Arabic word "sesam," which denotes plants. The sesame plant is said to have been initially grown in the Indus Valley, and sesame seed oil was the sole seed oil utilized throughout Vedic times. The sesame seed is reported to have grown from a drop of Lord Vishnu's perspiration that dropped to the ground in Hindu mythology. The sesame plant is a tall, upright annual with gorgeous white trumpet-shaped blooms. The fruit is a two-celled pod with white, buff, or black flat pear-shaped seeds. When the fruits are fully mature, the pods break open, scattering the seeds. The seeds and oil are widely utilized in Ayurvedic treatment, including virechana, vamana, and vasti treatments. The sesame seed is utilized as a basis for a range of herbs and chemicals that are used to treat Vata disorders. Although it is most beneficial to Vata types, it may be taken medicinally by anybody. Sesame is sattvic in nature and creates a serene state of mind, making it one of the original meals of the cosmos. Trikatu (ginger, black pepper, and long pepper) is an old Ayurvedic recipe made up of equal parts of three strong spices: ginger, black pepper, and long pepper, like triphala. Trikatu, unlike triphala, produces a lot of heat. This ancient trio, often known as the three pungent spices, is one hundred times more effective when all three components are mixed. Trikatu is the major formula used to heal digestive issues and eliminate the existence of ama in the body, and it is utilized in both virechana and vamana treatments. Trikatu is an expectorant, decongestant, and stimulant, and as such it is used to treat coldness, mucous, and stagnation in the body. Each of the three spices is energizing and hot in nature. They constitute a strong synergy that helps to restore many Vata and Kapha disorders when taken together.

  

Ginger (ardraka).

In Sanskrit, ginger is known as sunthi in its dry form and ardraka in its fresh form, and it conveys the powers of the earth's fire. The Vedas refer to it as "vishvabhesaja," or "universal medicine." Ginger is a sattvic or peace-producing food, despite its hot, pungent, and sweet character. Ginger is a perennial creeper with a thick tuberous rhizome that produces an upright annual stem that is native to Southeast Asia. Greenish purple blooms appear towards the end of the stalk. The root works as a heart tonic and a digestive stimulant. It relieves anorexia when combined with lime juice and honey, and it aids digestion when combined with lime juice and rock salt. Colds, flus, indigestion, nausea, laryngitis, arthritis, constipation, hemorrhoids, and migraines are all treated with ginger, as well as purgation treatment. It is ideal for Vata and Kapha diseases, however it may be taken medicinally by people of all kinds.

 

peppercorns (maricha).

Maricha, which means "sun" in Sanskrit, is a powerful source of solar energy. It is a potent digestive stimulant that burns ama and re-ignites agni. Black pepper, like the sun, is rajasic, or energy-producing in nature. The black pepper plant is a perennial climbing shrub with little white blooms and tiny yellow berries that become red as they develop. They are native to South India and prefer to be in the shade. Their tendrils frequently cling to the trunks of coconut trees. Chronic indigestion, obesity, congestion, bodily coldness, bronchitis, sinusitis, intestinal parasites, and toxins in the colon are all treated with black pepper. It is ideal for Vata and Kapha diseases, however it may be taken medicinally by people of all kinds.

 

peppers (pippali).

Pippali, the third ingredient in the trikatu mix, brings out the subtle fire (tejas) in black pepper and ginger. These peppers, which are native to India and Java, are harvested when still green and dried to retain maximum heat strength. The peppers are grey in color when dried, with a modest scent and a spicy flavor. Pippali is used to treat Vata and Kapha problems as a carminative, stimulant, and digestant, as well as an emetic.

 

Triphala (amalaki, bibhitaki, and haritaki).

Triphala is a mix of three ancient medicinal fruits from the myrobalam family: amalaki, haritaki, and bibhitaki, which are widely utilized in Ayurveda. These three fruits are ground into a powder known as triphala or used to make a revitalising jam. Triphala is an Ayurvedic remedy that is both old and widely used. The combo of these three strong myrobalam fruits gives an infinitely powerful harmonic treatment for a thousand human ailments. Triphala strengthens the stomach and intestinal tract, restores the immune system, protects the tissues and organs, increases appetite, decreases internal heat and quenches thirst, neutralises ama, alleviates urinary problems such as diabetes, and is a fantastic rejuvenative tonic, among other things. Triphala is a herb that is used in virechana treatment to induce moderate purgation and is beneficial to people of all sorts.

 

Amalaki

The amalaki tree's fruit is made up of five parts, which symbolize the five elements in Hindu mythology. The amalaki tree is thought to be the universe's first tree. Its fruits are huge and pulpy, and when dried, they become black. Although the entire tree is employed, the fruit is considered the most essential portion of the plant in Ayurvedic medicine. Amalaki is a cooling fruit that is sweet, sour, pungent, bitter, and astringent. It is utilized as a nutritional tonic, blood cleanser, and for restoring tissue normality on its own. Even though amalaki is mostly sour, it is suitable for all palates.

 

Bibhitaki

Bibhitaki is the third sister of the myrobalam tree family, and it grows mostly in the and areas. The fruits of this enormous, prolific tree are huge, spherical, and pulpy, with astringent and sweet flavors. Bibhitaki is used for eye problems, hair loss, bronchial asthma, constipation, skin problems, and as an anti-inflammatory and expectorant because of its heating properties. Bibhitaki can be utilized by people of all kinds.

 

Haritaki

Haritaki fruits are borne on a huge tree with thick leaves and golden blooms, as mentioned in Ayurvedic scriptures. They are brownish black in hue and pear-shaped. Haritaki thrives in both cold and hot climes, and is considered a sister of the amalaki tree. In Ayurveda, the type cultivated in temperate areas is utilized more frequently. The Buddha is frequently shown holding the haritaki fruit in his right hand, which is revered by both Vedic and Buddhist seers. Haritaki improves lifespan, treats heart diseases, opens physiological channels, and boosts prana when administered alone. Grief, depression, cancer, eye ailments, skin ailments, rheumatism, and diabetes are all treated with it. Haritaki, like amalaki, has a warming effect and comprises five of the six flavors; only the salty taste is missing. It can be eaten with a tiny amount of brown sugar in the summer and autumn, a tiny amount of rock salt in the early fall, a small quantity of ginger powder in the early winter, a few pinches of pippali powder in the late winter, and a tiny amount of honey in the spring.

  

Trivrit

The trivrit plant's root is well recognized for its widespread usage in Ayurvedic purgative treatment. Trivrit, like the madana fruit used in emesis treatment, was referenced by Charaka and Sushruta, as well as others.

 

 Vagbhatta

There are two sorts of trivrit plants: one that is black and one that is red. The root of the red trivrit plant is recommended in Ayurvedic treatment. Trivrit is a sweet, astringent, and dry herb used in purgation treatment to treat Pitta and Kapha illnesses such skin illnesses, fever, mental disorders, gynecological disorders, stomatitis, anorexia, and bronchial asthma.




A Few Herbs Used in Vasti Therapy are Described:


Aloe vera (kumari)

This plant, often known as aloe vera, is native to the arid, sunny landscapes of Southeastern and Northern Africa, Spain, Indonesia, India, the Caribbean, and, more recently, Australia and the Southwest United States. The Indians, Chinese, Greeks, and Egyptians have all employed aloe as a medicinal plant for millennia. Aloe vera, which has a bitter, sweet, and astringent flavor, is used to restore normal health by modifying nutritive and excretory processes. This plant is also used as a moderate laxative, a liver and spleen tonic, to control the intestines' peristaltic motions, to stimulate digestion, and to ease abdominal distension by encouraging the downward flow of wind. All three doshas are relieved by aloe vera, which is also beneficial in lowering Pitta problems such fevers, skin infections, burns, ulcers, and oedema. Aloe vera is very beneficial to the pituitary, thyroid, and ovaries. Aloe vera softens and smoothes the complexion and relaxes the tissues and body as a general rejuvenator. Aloe vera is calming to the intestinal and vaginal passageways and is used in douching and enema solutions. It eliminates parasites from the colon and, when combined with other enema treatment substances, treats intestinal TB, convulsions, and epilepsy. Aloe vera may be used externally to treat wounds and burns, as well as as a hair and scalp conditioner.


Ajwan

Ajwan, also known as wild celery seed, is a powerful digestive, respiratory, and nerve stimulant used to treat high Vata diseases such intestinal gas, spasms, and mental problems. Colds, flus, asthma, bronchitis, laryngitis, oedema, sinus congestion, and renal dysfunction can all be treated with Ajwan. It eliminates deep-seated ama and boosts metabolic activity. Ajwan is a spicy spice with a warming energy that is utilized as one of several substances in vasti treatment.


Asafoetida (hingu).

The resin from the fleshy root of the perennial hingu, or asafoetida plant, is harvested from mature plants that are more than five years old. Asafoetida is one of the strongest digestive stimulants in Ayurveda and is normally used in very tiny quantities. It is sometimes referred to as "devil's dung" due to its exceedingly unpleasant and pervasive sulphurous smell. Constipation, indigestion, flatulence, abdominal distension, intestinal discomfort, arthritis, whooping cough, convulsions, epilepsy, intestinal parasites, hysteria, and palpitations are among the Vata and Kapha illnesses for which it is prescribed. Asafoetida is utilized in vasti treatment even though it is contraindicated for Pitta disorders. Asafoetida helps to break down restricted faecal waste generated through extended ingestion of animal or unwholesome meals, as well as to remove worms in the large intestine, while increasing the intestinal flora. Asafoetida has a lot of heat in it. 


Ashwagandha

The Sanskrit word ashwagandha refers to the fragrance or vigor of a horse, or what gives the body its "horse force." The root of the ashwagandha plant, also known as winter cherry in English, is used to treat Vata diseases such as sexual debility, nervous tiredness, emaciation, issues associated with old age, memory loss, spermatorrhea, tissue shortage, insomnia, paralysis, and infertility. Ashwagandha can help with kapha issues include trouble breathing, coughing, and anaemia. Skin problems and glandular swellings are also treated with ashwagandha when Pitta is low in the body. Ashwagandha, which is similar to ginseng in nature, is a good herb for enhancing semen and fertility. Ashwagandha is also utilized in vasti treatment, which is delivered through the vaginal or penis, to treat urinary tract and bladder problems, as well as infertility and sperm inadequacy. During pregnancy, ashwagandha is a good balancer for the baby. It also promotes tissue repair while regenerating the hormonal system. Ashwagandha is a warming herb with a sweet, astringent, and bitter flavor.


Bala

The country mallow, or bala as it is known in Sanskrit, is a plant that provides vigor and vigor. Bala is a sweet and cooling tonic that is beneficial to all three doshas. It affects all dhatus, particularly the marrow and nerves. Bala, atibala, and mahabala are the three principal mallow kinds utilized in Ayurveda. Bala is a rejuvenating tonic that is particularly beneficial in the treatment of Vata diseases. Bala feeds the nerves, calms the muscular system, and soothes nerve tissue irritation, making it good for the heart. Bala oil is applied topically to relieve nerve discomfort, numbness, and muscle spasms. Bala is also utilized in vasti treatment as one of the moderate substances to tone the colon while improving intestinal flora and controlling correct peristaltic movement.




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Ayurvedic Plants - The Spiritual and Magickal Nature of Herbs

 



Plants, which are deeply embedded in the earth's vitality, hold the memories of all time. In Ayurveda, the therapeutic virtues of plants have been extracted from the wisdom passed down from the ancient sages.

The ancient seers energetically examined an infinite number of plants and herbs, defining their therapeutic potential and rendering them into dried herbs, powders, tinctures, oils, and other forms.

Elephants carry the cosmic memory of all plants, with Gaja being the most ultimate elephant. While elephants are still living, they continue to benefit us by "saving" the part of our brain that remembers plant knowledge.

The widespread vibrations of the elephants' natural understanding of plant life and medicines are delicately conveyed into the memory processes of all other species, resulting in this so-called preservation.

This transmission occurs in the same manner as the moon reflects on a lake's surface, with the moon symbolizing the elephant's memory and the lake symbolizing the human memory receptor. 

There would be no reflection of the moon in the lake if it were removed. Similarly, if elephants were to vanish from the face of the world, humans would no longer be able to maintain their knowledge of plant medicine in their memory banks. Plants, like all other members of their species, have mental characteristics.


The holy and magical origins of plants and animals abound in Hindu mythology. 


The lotus plant, considered the cradle of the cosmos, emerging from formlessness into glorious splendor, is abundantly employed in Ayurvedic medicine, to name a few instances.

The lotus plant is claimed to have cosmic memory of the universe's origins in the primordial seas. Its bloom is claimed to have blossomed from Lord Vishnu's navel. 

Imbibing lotus medication allows every cell and tissue in the body to bask in the radiance of the lotus.


When ingested, Ashwagandha, a herb called after the horse's strength and odor, is supposed to convey its inherent essence of vigor and prowess to the human body. 

Ashwagandha, which is known for its virility, is supposed to awaken the memory of potency in every cell of the body. 


Similarly, the pomegranate plant and its fruit are associated with prosperity and fertility in the cosmos.

 This fruit is traditionally used to cleanse the body of jealously, jealously, and other unpleasant vibrations, letting it to flourish and bathe in the abundant light of the self. 


A sweat droplet from Lord Vishnu's body is claimed to have fallen to the ground and grown into the sesame plant, giving rise to the sesame seed. 

The shrub soon produced lovely white trumpet-shaped blooms. 

Sesame seeds are thought to evoke the memory of renewal when consumed, bestowing "sneha," or profuse affection, to cells and tissues. 


Ginger transports the power of the earth's fire deep into the body's tissues.

Ginger, also known as the universal medicine, is said to awaken the body's recollection of the universe's primordial fire, when all manifestation changed into life, along with this hot memory. 


Similarly, black pepper, which gets its name from the sun, transmits solar vibrations throughout the body, allowing the body to respond to light and heat. 


Plants, in this sense, are thought to hold considerably more than their immobile look would imply; they transmit the important memories that keep all life going. 



You may also want to read more about Ayurveda and Holistic Healing here.











Ayurveda Dictionary - A Repository of Common Terms and Meanings used in Ayurveda

 


  • AGNI . The biological re that provides energy for the body to function. Agni regulates body heat and aids digestion, absorption, and assimilation of food. It transforms food into energy or consciousness.
  • AHAMKARA. Literally, the “I-former”; the ego; sense of separate self; the feeling of “I am.”
  • AMA. A toxic, morbid substance (both systemic and cellular) produced by undigested food which is the root cause of many diseases.
  • ANUPANA. Substance (such as milk, water, ghee, etc.) that serves as a medium for taking herbs.
  • ARTAVA DHATU. The female reproductive tissue, one of the seven dhatus or bodily tissues.
  • ASTHI DHATU. One of the seven dhatus or bodily tissues; specifically, the bone tissue that supports the body, giving protection, shape, and longevity.
  • AYURVEDA. The science of life; derived from the Sanskrit words ayur meaning life, and veda, knowledge or science. The Vedas are the authentic, ancient, spiritual scriptures of India.
  • BASMATI RICE. A long-grained scented rice originating in the foothills of the Himalayas in India. Easily digestible and nutritious.
  • BASTI. One of the five important cleansing measures of panchakarma, it eliminates excess vata dosha from the system via medicated herbal tea or oil enemas. Helps greatly to heal all vata disorders. The word basti literally means bladder. In ancient times, the apparatus used for the procedure was made out of leather.
  • BHASMA. A specialized Ayurvedic compound prepared and purified by being burned into ash; bhasmas have a high potency and release prana into the system.
  • BHASTRIKA. A breathing practice (pranayama) in which air is passively drawn in and forcibly pushed out, as in a bellows. Increases heat and improves circulation.
  • BHRAMARI. A type of breathing practice (pranayama) in which a soft humming sound, like a bee, is made during exhalation and/or inhalation. Calms the mind and cools pitta.
  • CARDAMOM. Pungent spice from a tropical plant.
  • CHAI. General word for tea; often refers to a spiced black tea made with milk and sugar.
  • CHAKRAS. The energy centers in the body, related to nerve plexus centers, which govern bodily functions. Each chakra is a reservoir of consciousness.
  • CHICKPEA FLOUR. A finely ground yellow flour. Also called gram.
  • CILANTRO. Fresh coriander leaf. This herb is used extensively in Indian cooking and valued for its zesty and cooling taste. Balances spicy dishes.
  • COCONUT MILK. Made from grating the white flesh of the coconut and mixing with a cup of water.
  • COCONUT WATER. The natural juice inside the coconut.
  • DAL. Any type of dried bean, pea, or lentil is called dal. Most dal is husked and split for quick cooking and greater ease of digestion.
  • DHATU. The structural, building, elemental tissue of the body. There are seven dhatus defined in Ayurveda: rasa (plasma); rakta (blood tissue); mamsa (muscle tissue); meda (adipose tissue); asthi (bone marrow); majja (bone and nerves); shukra and artava (male and female reproductive tissue).
  • DOSHA. The three main psycho-physiological functional principles of the body (vata, pitta, and kapha). They determine everyone’s constitution and maintain the integrity of the human body. The doshas govern the individual’s response to changes. When disturbed, they can initiate the disease process.
  • GHEE. Clarified butter; made from unsalted butter that has been gently cooked and the milk solids removed.
  • GUGGULU. Main ingredient in several herbal preparations (yogaraj guggulu, kaishore guggulu, etc.). A resin from a small tree, it has many useful medical actions, including bene ts for the nervous system, tonification, and anti-in amatory action on muscle tissues. Helps increase white blood count (good for the immune system) and is a nervine, rejuvenating tonic.
  • GUNAS. Three qualities influencing all creation: sattva, rajas, and tamas. Sattvic qualities imply essence, reality, consciousness, purity, and clarity of perception. All movement and activity are due to rajas. Tamas brings darkness, inertia, heaviness, and materialistic attitudes. There is a constant interplay among these three gunas in all creation. Also refers to the qualities (hard/soft, hot/cold, etc.) of the three doshas, seven dhatus, and three malas.
  • JAGGERY. An unrefined sugar made from the juice of crushed sugarcane stalks.
  • KAPHA. One of the three doshas, combining the water and earth elements. Kapha is the energy that forms the body’s structure— bones, muscles, tendons—and provides the “glue” that holds the cells together. It supplies the water for all bodily parts and systems, lubricates joints, moisturizes the skin, and maintains immunity. In balance, kapha is expressed as love, calmness, and forgiveness. Out of balance, it leads to attachment, greed, and envy.
  • KHAVAIGUNYA. A weak or defective space within an organ or tissue of the body where a pathological condition is likely to begin.
  • KITCHARI. A cooked mixture of rice and dal and spices that is easy to digest and high in protein. Often used as a nourishing food for a mono-fast.
  • LASSI. A refreshing drink made from yogurt, water, and spices and often served at the end of a meal as a digestive. Can be sweet or salty.
  • MAHAT (or MAHAD). The “great principle,” intelligence, the cosmic aspect of intellect; also contains the individual intellect, called Buddhi.
  • MAJJA DHATU. One of the seven dhatus or bodily tissues; the bone marrow and nerve tissue. It is unctuous and soft. Its main function is to oleate the body, to fill up the bone, and to nourish the shukra dhatu. It plays an important role in communication.
  • MAMSA DHATU . One of the seven dhatus or bodily tissues; the muscle tissue. Produced by rasa and rakta, its main functions are to provide physical strength, coordination, movement, covering, form, and protection.
  • MANTRA. A sacred word or phrase of spiritual significance and power that transcends the mind and yields bliss.
  • MARMA. An energy point on the skin that has a door receptor and is connected to the inner pathways of healing.
  • MUNG DAL. A small bean that has been husked and split. Usually a medium yellow color. Easy to digest.
  • NASYA. Method of administering medication through the nose; one of the ve measures of panchakarma.
  • NIGHTSHADE. Common name for a family of plants including tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant, tobacco, petunias, and belladonna, which have strong medicinal properties. Frequent use may disturb the doshic equilibrium.
  • OJAS. The pure essence of all the bodily tissues (dhatus); the super ne essence of kapha; maintains immunity, strength, and vitality. Ojas creates bliss and awareness in the mental faculties and governs the body’s immune function. If it is depleted, it can lead to death.
  • PANCHAKARMA. Five measures for elimination of excess dosha and/or ama from the body. Used for the purpose of internal puri cation. They are: vomiting (vamana); purgation (virechana); medicated oil or decoction enema (basti); bloodletting (rakta moksha); and nasal administration of specific medication (nasya).
  • PIPPALI. Piper longum; a close relative of black pepper, which has many medicinal applications, especially for digestion and respiration. A rejuvenative tonic (rasayana) for the lungs and liver.
  • PITTA. One of the three doshas; it corresponds to the elements of re and water. Sometimes referred to as the re or bile principle, pitta governs digestion, absorption, assimilation, metabolism, and body temperature. In balance, pitta promotes understanding and intelligence; out of balance pitta arouses anger, hatred, jealousy.
  • PRAKRUTI . Prakruti (spelled with a capital P) is the Cosmic Creativity, the primordial matter.
  • PRAKRUTI. The inherent nature or psychosomatic, biological constitution of the individual, prakruti is the xed constitution of a person, which reflects the proportion of the three doshas (vata, pitta, and kapha) established at conception.
  • PRANA. The vital life energy. Without it, life cannot exist. The ow of cellular intelligence from one cell to another. Equivalent to the Oriental Ch’i or Ki.
  • PRANAYAMA. The control of life energy by various techniques which regulate and restrain breath, through which one can control the mind and improve one’s quality of awareness and perception. Helpful with all types of meditation.
  • PURUSHA. Choiceless, passive awareness; the pure Cosmic Being.
  • RAJAS. One of the three universal qualities (gunas) of Prakruti, Cosmic Creativity. Rajas is active, mobile, dynamic.
  • RAKTA DHATU. The second of the seven tissues (dhatus), rakta mainly contains red blood cells, which carry life energy (prana) to all bodily tissues. This oxygenates, or provides the life function, for all the tissues.
  • RASA DHATU. The rest of the seven dhatus, rasa (plasma) is nourished from digested food, and after absorption, it circulates in the entire body via specific channels. Its main function is to provide nutrition to each cell of the body.
  • RASAYANA. Rejuvenation therapy which brings about renewal, regeneration, and restoration of bodily cells, tissues, and organs, giving longevity to the cells and enhancing immunity and stamina. 
  • RISHI. A seer, a Vedic sage. The ancient rishis perceived and/or recorded the Vedic hymns. These enlightened sages shared their knowledge, medicine, philosophy, and spiritual teachings.
  • RUDRAKSHA. The “tears of Shiva”; the dried seeds from the fruit of the rudraksha tree. Said to be good for the heart both physically and spiritually, helpful for meditation and for “opening the heart chakra.”
  • SAFFRON . A golden yellow spice that comes from the stigma of a particular crocus. The best quality saffron is grown in Spain and Kashmir.
  • AMPRAPTI. The pathogenesis of disease; the entire disease process from its cause through its various stages to the complete manifestation of the disease.
  • SANKHYA. One of the schools of Indian philosophy, Sankhya denotes both “discriminative knowledge” and “enumeration.” It gives a systematic account of cosmic evolution from Purusha (Cosmic Spirit) and Prakruti (Primordial Matter) through the stages of creation: Mahad (Cosmic Intelligence); Ahamkara (individuating principle); Mana (mind); Indriyas (the inner doors of perception); Tanmatras (the objects of perception); and Mahat Bhutas ( ve great elements). Sat means truth and khya means to realize; thus Sankhya means to realize the theory of the creation of the universe in order to realize the ultimate truth of human life. Sankhya reveals the journey of consciousness into matter.
  • SATTVA. One of the three gunas of Prakruti, sattva denotes light, clarity, purity of perception; it is the essence of pure awareness.
  • SHITALI. A practice of pranayama (breath control) that cools the system. Inhalation is through the curled tongue; exhalation is slow, steady, and complete.
  • SHUKRA DHATU. The seventh tissue (dhatu); the male reproductive tissue.
  • SROTAS. Bodily channels.
  • SUCANAT. A granulated natural sugar made from pure sugarcane juice.
  • SURYA NAMASKAR. The Sun Salutation, a series of yoga postures done in a owing sequence with coordinated breathing.
  • TAMAS. One of the three gunas of Prakruti or Nature; its characteristics are darkness, inertia, and ignorance; it is responsible for sleep, drowsiness, dullness, unconsciousness.
  • TEJAS. The pure essence of the re element; the super ne essence of pitta dosha, which governs the transformation of matter into energy and of food, water, and air into consciousness.
  • TIKTA GHRITA . “Bitter ghee,” a specific Ayurvedic compound made of clarified butter with various bitter herbs; used for medicinal purposes.
  • TRIDOSHA. The three organizations or codes of intelligence within the body, mind, and consciousness; the three bodily humors: air (vata), re/bile (pitta), and water (kapha).
  • TRIKATU. An Ayurvedic compound of ginger, black pepper, and pippali (piper longum) that burns ama, detoxi es the body, and improves digestion, absorption, and assimilation.
  • TRIPHALA. An important Ayurvedic compound consisting of three herbs: amalaki, bibhitaki, and haritaki. It is the best laxative and bowel tonic and a balanced rasayana that is good for vata, pitta, and kapha.
  • TULSI. Indian holy basil. The sacred plant of Krishna, this herb is said to open the heart and mind, bestowing the energy of love and devotion.
  • TURBINADO. A granulated sugar made from pure sugarcane.
  • TURMERIC ROOT. An underground rhizome from a perennial plant native to southern India and Asia. Comes in a red and yellow form, but only the yellow is eaten. One of the most important herbs for both internal and external use, it is also essential in most Indian cooking.
  • VATA. One of the three doshas, combining the space and air elements; it is the subtle energy associated with bodily movement and governs breathing, blinking, muscle and tissue movement, pulsation of the heart, and all movements in the cytoplasm and cell membranes. In balance, vata promotes creativity and exibility; out of balance, vata produces fear and anxiety.
  • VIKRUTI. The current state of the individual, as opposed to the original constitution (prakruti) at conception. It may also denote disorder.
  • YOGA. In its deeper sense, Yoga is union of the lower self with the higher self, of the inner with the outer, mortality with immortality. Yoga postures (asanas) promote health, exibility, and purity toward achieving the state of Yoga.



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Ayurvedic Healing Properties of Metals



Metals' Healing Properties and How to Use Them


Everything in existence, according to Ayurveda, is filled with the energy and intellect of Universal Consciousness. Because all kinds of matter, both biological and inorganic, are only the outward expressions of this most delicate creative force. 

Matter is the consciousness's imprisoned light. Life's vital energy emanates from the universal source, the essence of all matter, and shows itself in nature's many forms and manifestations. 

All substances in nature possess this cosmic creative intelligence, according to Ayurveda's traditional scriptures, and so have a therapeutic potential when employed properly. Food, breathing, exercise, meditation, relationships, yoga, and massage, as well as structured daily and seasonal routines, are all used by Ayurvedic medicine in its effort to generate and preserve perfect health. 

Thousands of plants and herbal formulations are also used. Ayurveda also makes use of the therapeutic powers of metals, gemstones, colors, and scents. These contain unique, highly effective types of energy that can be used for healing. 

Most of these practices, which are well-documented in ancient texts, have been employed safely and successfully for thousands of years throughout Asia, but they were poorly recognized and recognized in the West until recently. This list will provide you a quick overview of different therapeutic approaches.

 Metals are a type of material that can be Metals are historically processed to be given internally in tiny dosages for medical purposes, after going through a rigorous and thorough purifying process to eliminate any detrimental effects on the body's important organs. The following suggestions are risk-free since they do not require ingesting the metal itself.





COPPER


Copper lowers fat and lowers extra kapha. It is a liver, spleen, and lymphatic system tonic that aids in the treatment of anemia. 

Wash several copper pennies thoroughly and boil them in a quart of water (or boil a quart of water in a copper vessel) until half the water remains to cure obesity and liver and spleen diseases. For a month, take 2 tablespoons of this copper water three times a day. 

It's also beneficial to get a copper drinking glass, fill it with pure water every night, and drink the water in the morning.


GOLD


Gold strengthens the neurological and cardiovascular systems, enhances memory and intellect, and boosts stamina. 

It is also beneficial to those with weakened lungs. Pre-exam stress among students, arthritis, and cardiac arrhythmia can all benefit from gold. Gold's energy may be harnessed by making gold-medicated water. 

Use pure gold, such as a gold band (24 karat is preferable). Boil the gold in 2 cups of water until 1 cup has evaporated. To invigorate the heart, boost mental faculties, and awaken pure consciousness, drink 1 teaspoon of this gold water 2 or 3 times a day. (Your gold will not be harmed as a result of this procedure.) 

It's also possible to manufacture golden rice. Place a piece of gold in the rice cooker and cook as usual while the rice is cooking. Remove the gold before serving the rice after it's done.


NOTE: Because gold has heating capabilities, it should be handled with caution by people who have a pitta constitution.


SILVER


Silver has cooling effects and can help with excessive pitta. Silver helps to balance vata by increasing strength and endurance. 

Silver may aid with emaciation, prolonged fever and weakness after a fever, heartburn, in amatory disorders of the intestines, and excessive menstrual flow. Silver has antibacterial, antiseptic, and disinfecting properties. 

Make silver water according to the gold water instructions above, and take 1 teaspoon 2 to 3 times a day. To increase strength and stamina, drink warm milk prepared in a silver pitcher.


STEEL


Bone marrow, bone tissue, the liver, and the spleen all benefit from this metal. It promotes the synthesis of red blood cells and aids in the treatment of anemia. Iron also rejuvenates and strengthens muscular and nerve structures. 

Cooking in cast iron pots and pans will provide you with more iron. However, too much iron in the body can be dangerous, so use it with caution. 

Although women may be iron-deficient during their menstrual periods and benefit from supplemental iron, very few males in Western civilization require it. Long-term staunch vegans may be an exception.



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Ayurvedic Healing Properties of Gemstones




Healing Stones and Gems

Healing energies are contained in gems and precious stones, which may be triggered by wearing them as jewelry, such as rings or necklaces, or by soaking them in water overnight and drinking the water the next day. 

Gems stimulate the body's vital energy centers (chakras) and have a direct effect on the vata, pitta, and kapha doshas.

They may be utilized to calm or activate certain organs in the body, as well as to amplify or counteract the effects of various planets in an individual's astrological birth chart. 



Here are a few crucial basic considerations before we get into the impacts of individual gems and stones.


• Gems have a tendency to absorb their owner's traits and energy vibrations. Before utilizing any stone, it is a good idea to clean it. Soaking it in saltwater or milk for two days should suffice. The stone will not be harmed as a result of this.

• When wearing a gemstone, it should make contact with the skin through a small window in the setting, allowing the stone's delicate energies to interact directly with the body's energies.

• It's crucial to wear the stone in the right place. 

Here are a few suggestions: 

  • opal—ring finger 
  • yellow sapphire—index finger 
  • blue sapphire—middle finger 
  • diamond—ring finger 
  • pearl—little finger 
  • red coral—ring finger 
  • emerald—little finger 
  • opal—ring finger 
  • emerald—little finger

Ayurveda suggests that rings be worn on the right hand, however in the West, if someone wishes to follow tradition and wear their wedding band on the left hand, that is ok.

• Stones that have been processed or chemically treated may not have the same therapeutic properties. It's ideal to get genuine, untreated, clean stones that don't have any flaws or cracks. If you're thinking about buying a stone, make sure to inspect it with a magnifying lens for cracks or blemishes.

• If feasible, stones should be 3 to 5 karats, although a 1-karat diamond would suffice. A stone that is too tiny will have a little impact.

• Consult an expert before purchasing a stone unless you are informed with both stones and Vedic astrology (jyotish). A negative in sequence might occur if you choose the incorrect gem for you or wear it on the incorrect portion of your body. Here are some of the primary gems and stones' features.



RUBY 

The sun is represented by the ruby in astrology. It is a life-protecting stone that promotes longevity and wealth, especially for vata and kapha people. This gem improves attention and gives mental strength. It also helps to keep the heart healthy. Rubies balance the vata and kapha doshas, although they can also raise the pitta dosha. Garnets have the same vibration as rubies and are sometimes referred to as the "poor man's ruby." Wear rubies and garnets together as a ring or a necklace on the ring finger. 



PEARL 

Pearls symbolize the moon, much as rubies represent the sun. They offer a relaxing, therapeutic vibration and a cooling impact. Pearls are beneficial to all doshas, although their cooling effect is especially beneficial to pitta. Pearls are said to bring mental serenity and tranquility. Internally, pearl ash is used to cure a variety of diseases. Many of the pearl's strengthening properties may be obtained by creating pearl water. Put 4 or 5 pearls in a glass of water overnight and consume the water the next morning.


SAPPHIRE, YELLOW

This beautiful stone, which is associated with Jupiter, gives stability, grounding, and knowledge. It has a calming effect on both vata and pitta, as well as a modest rise in kapha characteristics. It strengthens the heart as well as the lungs and kidneys. The Jupiter finger, the index finger, should always be adorned with yellow sapphire. Yellow topaz, sometimes known as the poor man's sapphire, shares many of the same characteristics as sapphire and provides similar advantages.


BLUE SAPPHIRE 

Saturn is represented by this lovely precious stone, which bestows the blessings of that spiritual planet. Saturn, the earth and iron god, bestows insight. Vata and kapha are calmed by blue sapphire, although pitta may be stimulated. It strengthens muscles and the skeletal system, as well as aiding arthritic recovery. On the right middle finger, wear a blue sapphire, preferably in a silver setting. It should not be worn with diamonds since it will cause discord.


LAPIS LAZULI

This stone is lofty and sacred, with Saturn-like energy. It strengthens the body, mind, and awareness, as well as making the user more sensitive to higher spiritual vibrations. It strengthens the eyes, soothes the vata and pitta, and relieves worry, fear, and heart weakness. It is also beneficial to the liver and skin ailments. Lapis should be set in gold and worn as a necklace or on the little finger.



EMERALD

This valuable stone is said to bring riches as well as spiritual awareness. Vata and pitta are calmed, the nervous system is settled, and uneasiness is relieved. Emeralds, which are the planet Mercury's symbol, boost writing abilities, verbal power, and intelligence. It's ideal to have them set in gold and wear them on the little finger.


DIAMOND 

This extremely potent gemstone slows down the ageing process, increases life expectancy, and boosts immunity. Its energy vibrates the heart, brain, and deeper physiological tissues with gentle energy vibrations. It is the most rejuvenating stone. It is both financially and spiritually beneficial. Diamonds have different doshic effects depending on their hue. The energy of red diamonds increases pitta, whereas the energy of blue diamonds cools and calms pitta while enhancing kapha. Pitta is calmed by clear, colourless diamonds, while vata and kapha are increased. Diamonds, which are connected with marriage and are symbolic of the planet Venus, really aid to develop a deep link in partnerships. The shukra, the body's reproductive tissue, is stimulated by these stones. This stone is associated with art, music, romance, and sex. Wear your gold-plated diamond as a necklace or a ring on your ring finger. However, low-quality diamonds may have harmful consequences on the health.


CORAL RED

The planet Mars is represented by this marine gemstone. It soothes pitta and aids in the management of wrath, wrath, and jealousy. The liver, spleen, and pericardium receive energy from coral. Wear your red coral as a necklace or as a ring on your ring finger, set in copper (ideally), silver, or white gold. Red coral is a powerful stone that also has an elegant quality about it.


OPAL

The planet Neptune is represented by this semiprecious stone. It strengthens both the majja and shukra dhatus (bone marrow and nerves) (reproductive tissue). It helps with migraine headaches, improves eyesight, reduces fever, and soothes pitta. Opals heighten spiritual sentiments, improve dedication, and assist with the development of intuition. This stone is very good to people who have Neptune in their third, fourth, sixth, tenth, or twelfth astrological house. On the ring finger, it should be set in gold or silver.


CAT'S EYE

Allergies, frequent colds and congestion, and allergic asthma benefit from this stone. It balances kapha and vata while raising pitta somewhat. It assists in the recovery of renal disease. Cat's-eye improves awareness and helps people avoid getting caught up in their emotions. Wear this stone in a gold setting on your ring or little finger if you work in psychological healing; it will shield you from negativity in sequences.


QUARTZ CRYSTAL

These stones have a vibratory frequency that is similar to that of diamonds and is reminiscent of Venus. Vata is calmed, perception is improved, communication is strengthened, and intuition is enhanced. Quartz crystals can be worn as a necklace or as a ring finger ring set in silver or gold.


ONYX 

This stone is beneficial for vata imbalances. It helps with epilepsy, Parkinson's illness, and even schizophrenia. It is beneficial for old age, disabling illnesses, and neurological malfunction. It promotes restful, deep sleep while also combating fatigue. It improves memory and encourages optimistic thinking. Onyx brings happiness and calm into one's life, as well as enhancing love in relationships. Its energetic vibrations are similar to those of the Sun and Jupiter. The ring finger should be adorned with this stone, which should be set in silver. (It's best not to wear this stone if your Sun sign is Sagittarius or Gemini.)


JADE 

Longevity is a benefit of jade. It is said to boost renal vitality and provide success to those who wear it. This stone is also beneficial to one's ability to communicate effectively. It protects against cataracts and strengthens the prostate. On your little finger, wear a silver-plated jade ring.


AMETHYST 

Amethyst is a stone that helps with mental clarity and is associated with the top chakra. It should be set in gold to bring wealth. You may also wear it as a gold necklace around your neck. Wearing amethysts and placing them at the four corners of the bed can benefit a person with neuromuscular weakness. The deeper colour of some amethysts gives them a Saturn-like vibe, akin to blue sapphire. Amethysts bring dignity, love, compassion, and hope to those who wear them. This stone aids in emotional regulation and is beneficial for vata and pitta imbalances.



AQUAMARINE


Aquamarine, a replacement for emerald, which represents Mercury, lowers mental dullness, stimulates cheerfulness and intellect, boosts verbal capacity, and increases memory. Aquamarine has Venus-like traits, so it's an excellent stone to wear if you're married and want to boost your love life. The little finger should be adorned with aquamarine, which should be set in silver. Remember that merely wearing the right stone will not cure a doshic imbalance; you must also watch your food, meditate, exercise properly, and practise yoga postures, as well as actively and carefully look after your day-to-day and moment-to-moment health. 


Low-Cost Stones that Can Assist in Dosha 

Balancing Although some of the gemstones covered  may be purchased for a reasonable price, many of them may be out of your price range right now. If that's the case, here are affordable stones that might help you achieve mental and physical equilibrium. 

Rose quartz can help to balance the vata dosha when it is too strong. Rose quartz's soothing hue and energy can help with vata problems including anxiousness, dry skin, constipation, intestinal gas, and lower back discomfort. 

Use red coral or pearls to help with inflamed pitta. Pitta diseases such as furious emotions, different in amatory ailments and “-itises” such as colitis and conjunctivitis, as well as hyperacidity, can benefit from their cooling energy. 

Garnets can help to balance the Kapha dosha. This stone's rich red hue enlivens the body's vitality and minimizes the symptoms of excess kapha, such as water retention, lethargy, sadness, and obesity.




You may also want to read more about Ayurveda and Holistic Healing here.