Showing posts with label Hoysala. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Hoysala. Show all posts

Hinduism - Where Is Karnataka In India?

 

Karnataka is one of four southern Indian states whose residents speak a Dravidian language, in this instance Kannada.

Karnataka is one of the "linguistic" states created following India's independence in 1947, with the goal of uniting people who speak the same language and have a same culture under one state government.

The previous kingdom of Mysore was primarily responsible for the formation of the state.

Karnataka was the center of prominent Hindu kingdoms in medieval periods, notably the Hoysala and Vijayanagar empires, who created towns such as Belur, Halebid, and Hampi, which are today notable archeological sites.

The Lingayats, Shiva worshipers (bhakta), live in Karnataka, and their missionary efforts finally pushed away the large Jain community.

However, Jain monuments such as the huge monolith at Shravanabelgola still survive.

Shrirangapatnam and Shringeri Math are two significant Hindu holy locations in Karnataka.

Despite the fact that majority of the state's economy is still based on agriculture, Bangalore, the state's capital, is a global hub for computer software development.

See Christine Nivin et al., India. 8th ed., Lonely Planet, 1998, for general information about Karnataka and other Indian states.


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Hinduism - Where Are The Hoyasala Temples Of Dorasamudra located?

 


Capital city of the Hoysala dynasty, who dominated the area in southern Karnataka from the eleventh to the thirteenth century, and where the ashes may be deposited in the river to ritually "cool" them. 

Dorasamudra is today known as Halebid, and it is a hamlet located sixty miles north and west of the city of Mysore. 

The location is recognized for a remarkable collection of temples, including the Hoysaleshvar Temple, which is devoted to the deity Shiva in his incarnation as Lord of the Hoysalas. 

The Hoysala temples were constructed of a specific kind of stone known as chlorite schist, steatite, or soapstone, which was soft when first mined but hardened with exposure to air. 

This early brittleness made the stone easier to cut, allowing for the rich detail that distinguishes these temples. 




You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.