Showing posts with label religious group. Show all posts
Showing posts with label religious group. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Are The Mahanubhav?

 


 ("Amazing Experience") A regional religious group whose members are devotees (bhakta) of the deity Vishnu and who are mostly located in Maharashtra's central areas.

Chakradhar created the Mahanubhavs in the thirteenth century.

Many features of "mainstream" Hindu religious practice have been rejected by the group under his influence, including caste differences, image worship, and brahmin religious authority.

The society is also known for adhering to an austere lifestyle.

Despite being Vaishnavas, the Mahanubhavs believe in just one God, whom they refer to as Parameshvar ("Great Lord") and who they believe has had five incarnations.

The deity Krishna and the deified ascetic Dattatreya are two of these incarnations who are well-known figures in the Hindu pantheon.

Chakradhar, Chakradhar's guru, and his guru's guru are the other three sectarianism characters.

Pilgrimage, vows, and almsgiving are all important aspects of their current practice.

Nonetheless, there remains a legacy of fear and mistrust of the Mahanubhavs across Maharashtra, perhaps based in their anti-authoritarian past.

Anne Feldhaus's The Religious System of the Mahanubhav Sect, published in 1983, has further information.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - Who Are The Kabirpanth?


Followers of the northern Indian poet-saint Kabir form a religious group.

Some Kabirpanthis are ascetics, while others live in houses.

The group's most prominent center, which houses an austere community, is at Benares (where Kabir is said to have resided).

Although Kabir opposes ceremony, worship, and dependence on anything other than one's own unmediated experience in his poetry—a background that suggests yoga practice—the Kabirpanth has adopted all of these traditional religious trappings.

The Bijak, a collection of poetry and epigrams ascribed to Kabir, is the community's holy scripture.

Kabir, who has become an object of adoration, is depicted in its holy centers.

On particular days, elaborate rites are carried out.

This is odd since many of the activities that Kabir criticized seem to have been accepted by the group that claims to follow his teachings.

Given Kabir's constant emphasis on the necessity for direct, intimate encounters with the divine, the idea of his being regarded as the founder of a sect would have been absurd to him.

See David Lorenzen, “Traditions of Non-Caste Hinduism: The Kabir Panth,” Contributions to Indian Sociology, Vol. 21, No. 2, 1987, for more information.



You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.