Showing posts with label Hindu Temples. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Hindu Temples. Show all posts

Hinduism - Where Is The Muktinath Temple Located?


The temple is at approximately 13,000 feet at the foot of Annapurna, Nepal's tallest peak, and is a holy location (tirtha) at the headwaters of the Kali Gandaki River.

Both Hindus and Buddhists revere Muktinath, and each maintains a temple there.

The Buddhist temple is constructed atop a natural gas vent, which when fired emits a flame.

The Vishnu temple is constructed above a natural spring that is channeled outside the temple by 108 spouts styled like cow heads.

The riverbed of the Kali Gandaki is also a rich source of fossilized black ammonite, making it spiritually significant.

This ammonite, known as the shalagram, is a self-manifestation (svayambhu) form of Vishnu.


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Hinduism - Where Is The Lingaraja Temple In India?


The Gudimallam linga, the earliest known depiction of Shiva in this form, depicts him as both male and female, transcending the most fundamental defining characteristic of human identity.

The most prominent and largest of the temples in Bhubaneshvar, dedicated to the deity Shiva as Tribhuvaneshvar, the "Lord of the Three Worlds." The temple was constructed in the eleventh century C.E., and it represents the pinnacle of the Nagara architectural style's Orissan branch.

With shorter auxiliary structures running up to it, the temple construction culminates in a single, high peak point above the image of the temple's major deity.

The Lingaraja temple has all of the components of Orissan architecture, including a 120-foot-high beehive-shaped tower (deul), a dancing hall (natamandira), an entry hall (jagamohan), and an outside entrance hall (bhogamandapa).


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Hinduism - What Is A Gopuram In Hindu Temple Architecture?


Gopurams are magnificent temple entrances in the middle of the temple's outer walls in the Dravida style of temple architecture, which was mostly dominant in southern India.

Temples created in the Dravida style are typically shorter than temples erected in the northern Indian Nagara style, but they make up for it by sprawling over large areas and establishing cities in their own right.

There are normally four gopurams, one for each of the cardinal directions; in some instances, these gopurams are 10 storeys tall and visible from miles away.

The gopurams were originally designed as defensive entrances to limit entry to the temple, but they now serve a more aesthetic purpose.

Gopurams make a statement about the authority of the resident deities (and their client kings) by dominating the skyline surrounding the temple, much like the spires of Gothic cathedrals; they have also served to educate the devout, since they are generally adorned with sculptures depicting mythical subjects. 


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