Showing posts with label Braj Bhasha. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Braj Bhasha. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is The Vinaya Patrika By Tulsidas?

 

 

Vinaya Patrika or a petition letter is a collection of 280 short poems written in the Braj Bhasha dialect by poet-saint Tulsidas (1532–1623?).


The entire work is presented as a letter of petition to Tulsidas' chosen deity, Rama, through the monkey god Hanuman, who acts as his intermediary.


The letter's main theme is a plea for deliverance from the current degenerate age's evils (kali yuga).


The first sixty-odd verses are a series of invocations to various gods, demonstrating Tulsidas' devotion's ecumenical quality.

The poem's remainder is addressed to Rama and emphasizes other themes that run throughout Tulsidas' poetry.


One of the themes is the kali yuga's corrupted nature, which makes devotion the only effective means of salvation.


Another pervasive theme is the incomparable power of God's name to rescue the devotee (bhakta).

Finally, the listeners are cautioned not to squander the gift of human birth.

Much of the poetry has an intensely personal quality to it, and it seems to reflect both the poet's despair and eventual hope for salvation.

The Vinaya Patrika is generally thought to have been written in the poet's later years, though it cannot be precisely dated, based on its general tone.



~Kiran Atma


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.


Hinduism - What Is The Modern Indo-European (National) Language Of Hindi? Why Is It Widely Perceived As A Current Imperialist Threat To Native Minority Indian Tongues, Script, And Culture?


Modern Indian language classified as a member of the Indo-European language family; Hindi is the Republic of India's "official" language.

Hindi is spoken as a second or "link" language in much of northern and central India, as well as as a "mother" tongue in parts of Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh.

It is also one of the broadcast languages for the Indian government's television and radio networks, which may be found all around the country thanks to these media.

Hindi, like many of India's regional languages, has a lengthy literary history, especially in an older form known as Braj Bhasha, which was the primary language in which northern Indian devotional (bhakti) poetry was composed.

The gradual extinction of Sanskrit in modern times has aided the rise of Hindi as a literary language, a studied language, and a medium for writing about Indian culture.

In contemporary India, speaking a particular language frequently has political ramifications, since keeping one's regional language has been a key role in sustaining regional identities.

As a result, many people are adamant about avoiding allowing Hindi to supplant their native tongues.

This feeling is especially strong in southern India, where the imposition of the Hindi language is seen as a new type of imperialism.

 

You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - What Is The Braj Bhasha?

 





The "language of Braj" is a medieval Hindi dialect spoken mainly in the Braj area, south of modern-day Delhi. 



Braj is the region of Krishna, and the devotion that thrived there between the fifteenth and eighteenth centuries helped to establish Braj Bhasha as a significant literary language. 





Apart from being the language of Krishna followers, it also served as a lingua franca—a common language spoken by a wide range of people—for religious adherents (bhakta) throughout a much wider region of northern India, but dialects differed at the boundaries.





You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.