Showing posts with label Kaivalya. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Kaivalya. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Are The Yoga Sutras?

 

 


 ("yoga aphorisms") A collection of short sayings attributed to the sage Patanjali that serve as the basic texts for the Yoga school, one of the six schools of Hindu philosophy.

The sage Vyasa's commentary on Patanjali's Yoga Sutras is often read alongside the text, and it has been considered as an important component of the book.


The Yoga Sutras are split into four sections, each of which focuses on a different theme: 


  1. The first part is about concentration (samadhi), 
  2. the second part is about the mechanics of spiritual development (sadhana), 
  3. the third part is about various attainments (vibhuti), including magical powers (siddhi), 
  4. and the last part is about yogic isolation (kaivalya), which the text calls liberation.


The Yoga school is often considered the "practical" articulation of Samkhya theory, and the text presupposes the cosmology taught by the Samkhya school, another of the six schools.


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Hinduism - What Is Kaivalya In The Samkhya And Yoga Hindu Philosophical Schools?

 

 (“isolation”) Kaivalya is the stage of ultimate emancipation in both Samkhya and Yoga, two of the six schools of Hindu philosophy.

The contrast between the aware but inert purusha, which is identified as the Self, and the active but unconscious prakrti is completely understood by a person who has acquired kaivalya.

According to Samkhya metaphysics, the growth of subjective awareness and the outside universe is triggered by misunderstanding between these two eternally separate principles, in which the eternal Self becomes the witness to successive rebirths.

The theoretical reason for bondage and soul release is provided by Samkhya, whilst the path to freedom is provided by Yoga.

The goal of yoga is to assist people discern between these two principles by reducing barriers to insight, especially karmic inclinations based in egoism.

Those who can distinguish between these two principles and discover the soul's oneness with the purusha achieve independence from all external causes, mastery over all states of being, and omniscience, according to the Yoga Sutras, the founding literature for the Yoga system.

Samkhya: A Dualist Tradition in Indian Philosophy, edited by Gerald Larson and Ram Shankar Bhattacharya, was published in 1987, and A Sourcebook in Indian Philosophy, edited by Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan and Charles A. Moore, was published in 1957.



You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.