Showing posts with label Ekadashi. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Ekadashi. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is Yogini Ekadashi? When Is It Observed In The Hindu Calendar?

 


The eleventh day (ekadashi) of the dark (waning) half of the lunar month of Ashadh (June–July) is a religious celebration.

This, like other eleventh-day celebrations, is devoted to the worship of Vishnu, especially in his avatar as Narayana.

Most Hindu holidays have mandated ceremonies, which generally include fasting (upavasa) and devotion, and frequently promise particular rewards if performed faithfully.

Giving presents to needy brahmins is the recommended activity on this day; following the festival sincerely takes away the sin of chopping down a pipal tree (ashvattha) and also brings one birth in heaven.


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Hinduism - Who Is Vithoba?

 


The presiding deity of the same-named temple in Pandharpur, Maharashtra; Vithoba's other epithets include Vitthala and Pandurang.

Vithoba was a deified hero who was assimilated into the larger Hindu pantheon as a form of the god Vishnu, according to some theories.

Vishnu is drawn to Pandharpur by the filial piety of a young boy named Pundalika, according to the temple's founding legend.

When Vishnu arrives, Pundalika is massaging his father's feet, and when Vishnu requests the hospitality due to any guest, Pundalika only stops long enough to throw a brick over his shoulder, allowing the god to stand out of the mud.

Vishnu becomes rooted to that spot and has remained there ever since, impressed that Pundalika's devotion to his parents exceeds even his devotion to God; Vithoba's image depicts him with his hands on his hips (still waiting, perhaps, for Pundalika).

Apart from this story, Vithoba has a surprising lack of mythic history, despite becoming a powerful regional deity.

The Varkari Panth religious community, Vithoba's devotees (bhakta), make pilgrimages to Pandharpur twice a year.

Pilgrims travel from all over the world to visit Pandharpur, which is located in the Bhima River valley on the Maharashtra-Karnataka border.

Individual pilgrims travel in small groups known as dindis, which are usually made up of people from the same neighborhood or area.

The dindis are organized into palkhis, which are led by a palanquin (palkhi) bearing the san dals of one of the Varkari poet-saints.

Each palkhi leaves from a location associated with a particular saint—for example, Jnaneshvar's palkhi leaves from Alandi, where he lived, and thus he and all the other saints are still symbolically traveling to Pandharpur twice a year.

Each of these palkhis follows a predetermined route, and pilgrims time their departure and arrival in Pandharpur to coincide with the eleventh day (ekadashi) in the bright half of Ashadh (June–July) in the summer and the eleventh day in the bright half of Kartik (October–November) in the fall.

Pilgrims liken their journey to a small stream merging with other streams, eventually forming a mighty river that flows into Pandharpur.

Pilgrims sing devotional songs composed by poet-saints such as Jnaneshvar, Namdev, Eknath, Tukaram, Chokamela, Gora, Janabai, and Bahina Bai while on their journey.

By walking in the footsteps of the saints before them and singing their devotional songs, the pilgrims are emulating them.

The pilgrimage ends with the entry into Pandharpur and the worship of Vithoba, but the journey itself is the most important part.

G. A. Deleury's The Cult Of Vithoba, 1960; I. B. Karve's "On the Road," Journal of Asian Studies, Vol. 22 No. 1, 1962; and Digambar Balkrishna's Digambar Balkrishna's Digambar Balkrishna's Digambar Balkrishna's Digambar Balkrishna's Digambar Balkrishna Palkhi: An Indian Pilgrimage, edited by Mokashi, was first published in 1987.



Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - What Is Vijaya Ekadashi?

 



The eleventh day (ekadashi) of the dark (waning) half of the lunar month of Phalgun (February–March) is a religious celebration.

This is the eleventh-day observance devoted to the worship of Vishnu, as is the case with all eleventh-day observances.

Most Hindu holidays have pre-determined ceremonies, which generally include fasting (upavasa) and devotion, and frequently offer particular rewards for loyal participation.

Those taking this vow should fill an earthen pot with the seven varieties of grain, place an image of Vishnu on top of the pot, and recite the names of Vishnu for twenty-four hours.

The pot of grain should be handed to a brahmin on the twelfth.

In terms of outcomes, it is stated that diligently honoring this festival would provide vijaya (victory) over poverty and sadness.


~Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - What Is Putrada Ekadashi?


The eleventh day (ekadashi) of the bright (waxing) half of the lunar month of Shravan (July–August) and the eleventh day of the brilliant (waxing) half of the lunar month of Paush (December–January) are religious observances that occur twice a year.

These are devoted to the deity Vishnu, as are all eleventh-day observances.

Most Hindu holidays have mandated ceremonies, which generally include fasting (upavasa) and devotion, and frequently promise particular rewards if they are followed faithfully.

Following the ekadashi ceremonies on these days is said to result in the birth of a son (putra), which is a key worry in Indian culture.

Sons are required in this world and the next, not just to care for their aging parents, but also to carry out specific ancestral ceremonies after death.

The fact that this specific ekadashi happens twice throughout the year—the only ekadashi to do so—evidences the power of this longing for sons.


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Hinduism - What Is The Parivartini Ekadashi?

 

The eleventh day (ekadashi) of the bright (waxing) half of the lunar month of Bhadrapada (August–September) is a religious celebration.

This, like other eleventh-day observances, is devoted to Vishnu devotion.

This day is dedicated to Vishnu's wife Lakshmi, the goddess of riches and prosperity, and her husband Vishnu.

In her Mahalakshmi form (as recounted in the Devimahatmya), she can destroy demons that the gods can't, and she can reclaim the kingdom that the gods have lost.

Vishnu is said to be resting on the snake Shesha, in an ocean of milk, with Lakshmi stroking his feet at this festival.

Parivartini means "turning," and Vishnu is said to be turning in his slumber on this day.

See also cosmology and churning of the ocean.


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Hinduism - What Is The Nirjala Ekadashi?

 

The eleventh day (ekadashi) of the bright, waxing half of the lunar month of Jyeshth (May–June) is a religious celebration.

The eleventh-day observances are all devoted to the worship of Vishnu, the deity.

Most Hindu holidays have mandated ceremonies, which generally include fasting (upavasa) and devotion, and frequently promise particular rewards if they are followed faithfully.

This ekadashi has more stringent requirements than the others.

Not only is all food prohibited, but the individual performing the ceremony must also refrain from drinking water, hence the term nirjala, which means "waterless." The fast must endure from sunrise until sunset.

Because this ekadashi falls during the warmest time of the year, this will be a difficult endeavor.

The benefits are substantial: Whether or whether they have performed the ceremonies for the other twenty-four ekadashis throughout the year, those who complete the vow for this one ekadashi get religious merit for all twenty-four ekadashis during the year.

Keeping the ekadashi promise is also said to ensure a long life and the liberation of the soul after death.


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Hinduism - What Is The Mohini Ekadashi?

 


Mohini Ekadashi is a festival celebrated on the eleventh day (ekadashi) of Baisakh (April–May), the bright, waxing half of the lunar month.

The event is devoted to the worship of Vishnu as Rama, his incarnation.

Most Hindu holidays have specific mandated ceremonies, generally requiring fasting (upavasa) and prayer, with specific rewards promised for faithful performance; honoring this festival frees one from the consequences of one's wicked conduct.


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Hinduism - What Is Moksha In Hindu Spirituality?


Moksha is one of the four purusharthas, or life goals, in Indian philosophy; the others are artha (money, power, and success), kama (desire), and dharma (proper action) (righteousness).

The ultimate liberation of the human soul (atman) from the cycle of reincarnation is known as moksha (samsara).

Questioning and eventually distancing oneself from regular social interests is part of the search for liberation.

Despite the fact that all four purusharthas are lawful and sanctioned, emancipation is often seen as the final aim, the last objective to be achieved after the other three's joys and pains have been satisfied.

Moksha is likewise permanent, offering complete and perfect liberation, while the other three are transient since they are sought in the ever-changing world of wants.

The eleventh day (ekadashi) of the bright half of Margashirsha (November–December) is celebrated as #

Mokshada Ekadashi is devoted to Vishnu, as are other eleventh-day observances.

Most Hindu holidays have mandated ceremonies, which generally include fasting (upavasa) and devotion, and frequently promise particular rewards if performed faithfully.

The soul is said to get ultimate emancipation (moksha) if this festival is faithfully observed.


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Hinduism - What Is The Structure Of The Lunar Month In The Hindu Calendar?

 

Hindu festivals are defined by a lunar calendar, which divides the year into twelve lunar months.

The lunar month is split into two half with fifteen days each.

The lunar month in northern India starts with the dark (krishna) half of the moon, when it is declining.

The new moon marks the conclusion of this phase, which lasts fifteen days.

The bright (shukla) part of the month, while the moon is waxing, follows.

The full moon marks the conclusion of this phase, which lasts fifteen days.

The first day of the following lunar month is the day after the full moon, and so on.

The name of the month, the half (light or dark), and the lunar day are all used to identify any specific lunar day (1 to 15).

The sequence is inverted in southern India, with the lunar month beginning with the light half and ending with the new moon.

The lunar month, like many Hindu concepts of time, depicts changing moments of auspiciousness and inauspiciousness, with peaks and valleys denoting more or less auspicious times.

With its symbolism of fullness, richness, and light, the full moon is usually fortunate.

It is said that religious ceremonies conducted on this day have the same amount of virtue as those performed over the course of a month.

The new moon is a more confusing moment, with its connotations of darkness and nothingness.

The new moon may be very fortunate at times, such as on the occasion of a Somavati Amavasya (new moon falling on Monday).

The new moon coincides with many significant holidays (such as Diwali).

Regardless, the new moon is less fortunate than the full moon.

Various days are identified with distinct deities within each fort night, and their devotees (bhakta) frequently perform specific ceremonies on those days: The deity Vishnu is honored on the eleventh day (ekadashi), the Goddess on the eighth day (ashtami), the god Shiva on the thirteenth and fourteenth days (trayo dashi) and the god Ganesh on the fourth day (chaturthi).

As previously stated, practically all Hindu celebrations are based on the lunar calendar.

An intercalary month is introduced every 212 years to rectify the disparity between the lunar and solar years (approximately eleven days), and so retain these festivals at around the same time every year.

Although the additional month preserves the calendar in balance, it is thought to be exceedingly inauspicious, maybe due to its rarity.

People take usual measures to protect themselves during unfavorable periods throughout this month, such as deferring new activities until the end of the month and praying to protective deities until the end of the month.


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Hinduism - What Is Indira Ekadashi?

 

Indira Ekadashi is the eleventh day (ekadashi) of the dark (waning) half of the lunar month of Ashvin (September–October) falls on this day.

This, like other eleventh-day observances, is dedicated to the worship of Vishnu in his avatar as the Shalagram on this day.

Most Hindu holidays follow a set of rituals, which generally include fasting (upavasa) and prayer, and offer particular blessings.

This ekadashi occurs during the pitrpaksha, the fortnight devoted to the ancestors, and it is thought that diligently honoring this festival day would result in the rescue of millions of one's forefathers from bad incarnations and their rebirth in paradise.

The name "Indira" is an epithet of Vishnu's bride, Lakshmi. 


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Hinduism - What Is An Ekadashi? What Are The Different Ekadashis?

 


The Hindu religious calendar is based on the lunar calendar, which divides the year into twelve lunar months, each split evenly into "dark" (waning) and "bright" (waxing) halves. 

The eleventh day of the lunar month, in both the waning and waxing halves, is known as Ekadashi. 

During each half of the lunar cycle, some days are designated as holy to certain gods and goddesses, and these are days for special worship. 

The deity Vishnu considers the ekadashi, or eleventh day, of each lunar month to be holy. 

With the exception of one, each of the twenty-four ekadashis has its own name, charter story, mandated ceremonies, and expected outcome. 

Each of these twenty-four festival days is observed by pious Vaishnavas. 


The ekadashis are: 


  1. Papamochani Ekadashi and Kamada Ekadashi during Chaitra, 
  2. Baruthani Ekadashi and Mohini Ekadashi during Baisakh, 
  3. Achala Ekadashi and Nirjala Ekadashi during Jyeshth, 
  4. Yogini Ekadashi and Devshayani Ekadashi during Ashadh, 
  5. Kamika Ekadashi and Putrada Ekadashi during Kamika 
  6. During the lunar month of Bhadrapada, Aja Ekadashi and Parivartini Ekadashi, 
  7. Indira Ekadashi and Papankusha Ekadashi, 
  8. Rambha Ekadashi and Devotthayan Ekadashi, 
  9. Utpanna Ekadashi and Mokshada Ekadashi, 
  10. Paush Ekadashi and Putrada Ekadashi, 
  11. Magh Ekadashi and Vijaya Ekad 

 

Some of these ekadashis are more significant to the general public than others, notably the Devshayani and Devotthayan Ekadashis, which commemorate Vishnu's "sleep" during the chaturmas period during the rainy season. 

Putrada ("son-giving") Ekadashi is the only ekadashi that appears twice. 


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