Showing posts with label dharma literature. Show all posts
Showing posts with label dharma literature. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Is Considered The Author Of The Yajnavalkya Smrti?

 

Yajnavalkya is mentioned in the Upanishads, the theoretical books that make up the Veda's most recent textual layer, as a sage affiliated with King Janaka's court who was able to demonstrate that he had higher knowledge than the rest.

Based on the pattern of legendary ascription present in these works, he is also assigned as the author of the Yajnavalkya Smrti, one of the books that make up the dharma literature.


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Hinduism - What Is The Treatment Of Women In Dharma Literature?

 



Women from all socioeconomic categories were deemed shudras in the dharma literature, which meant they couldn't have another child, couldn't hear the Vedas, couldn't execute certain religious ceremonies, and in many regions couldn't possess land or resources unless they were married to a shudra.

At the same time, as daughters, mothers, wives, and patrons, women played (and continue to play) a vital role in Hindu religious life.

Women had their own specific role to play in traditional dharma literature, depending on their position as women.

Also see stridharma.


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Hinduism - What Is Surapana In Dharma Literature?

 

 

(“liquor-drinking”) In the dharma literature, one of the Four Great Crimes, the act of which rendered one a social outcast.

Although the name sura is often used to refer to "wine," it was formerly thought to refer to a specific sort of spirituous liquor derived from rice flour.

The most prevalent mandated penance (prayashchitta) for routinely drinking sura for members of the three highest social groups—brahmins, kshatriyas, and vaishyas—was to drink the same beverage boiling hot till one died.

Surprisingly, the shudras, the lowest socioeconomic stratum, are exempt from this punishment.

This distinction indicated their inferior social status, since they were not held to the same high standards as the "twice-born." 

Despite the high punishment for drinking sura, kshatriyas and vaishyas were allowed to consume other intoxicants without consequence, albeit brahmins who did so were required to do minor penances.


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