Showing posts with label Jivanmukti. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Jivanmukti. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Is A Jivanmukta?

 

A person who has gained ultimate soul liberation while still alive (jivanmukti) and continues to exist in a condition of freedom in Indian philosophy.

Many forms of Advaita Vedanta, one of the six schools of traditional Indian philosophy, include the notion of jivanmukta.

The Advaita school adheres to a philosophical viewpoint known as monism, which believes that everything is essentially different manifestations of a single Ultimate Reality known as Brahman.

The difficulty of human bonding, according to Advaita proponents, is that human beings, blinded by avidya or erroneous understanding, fail to see this ultimate oneness and continue to regard the universe as made up of distinct and varied entities.

The prospect of achieving jivanmukta status is important to the Advaita school because it supports their concept that bondage and liberation are achieved by replacing a faulty understanding with a true one, rather than by doing or becoming something.

After this has occurred, one will continue to exist, but their lives will never be the same due to the drastic shift in awareness.


 


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Hinduism - What Is The Concept Of Jivanmukti In Hindu Philosophy?

 

 ("freedom in the act of living") The idea that one may achieve ultimate soul liberation while still alive and then dwell in a liberated condition for the rest of one's life in later Indian philosophy.

Many of the subschools of Advaita Vedanta, one of the six schools of traditional Indian philosophy, make the claim of jivanmukta (one who is freed while still alive).

The Advaita school adheres to a philosophical viewpoint known as monism, which believes that all things are essentially different manifestations of a single Ultimate Reality known as Brahman.

The difficulty with human bonding, according to Advaita proponents, is that humans, blinded by avidya or misunderstanding, fail to comprehend this ultimate connection.

Liberation is achieved by comprehending what has always been the case, and therefore swapping a faulty idea for a true one, rather than by "doing" anything or becoming someone one is not.

Although this understanding permanently alters how a person perceives the universe, it has no ontological implications, implying that on a physical level, one continues to exist as before until the karma that generated one's current body has been spent.

For further detail, read Karl H. Potter's Advaita Vedanta up to Samkara and His Pupils, Advaita Vedanta up to Samkara and His Pupils, 1981.


 


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.