Showing posts with label tanmatras. Show all posts
Showing posts with label tanmatras. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is The Manipura Chakra?

 


The manipura chakra is one of the six psychic centers (chakras) thought to exist in the subtle body, according to several schools of yoga and tantra, a secret ritual-based religious practice.

The subtle body is an alternative physiological system that exists on a separate level of reality than coarse matter yet is related to it.

The six psychic centers are shown as multi-petaled lotus flowers that run approximately parallel to the spine and are joined by three vertical channels.

Each chakra has symbolic connotations with various human capabilities, numerous subtle elements (tanmatras), and various seed syllables (bijaksharas) derived from Sanskrit alphabet letters, including all holy sound.

The corporeal abodes of Shiva (consciousness) and Shakti (power), the two divine principles through which the whole cosmos came into existence, are located above and below these centers.

The homology of macrocosm and microcosm, a key Hindu belief from the time of the mystical books known as the Upanishads, is the basic premise underpinning the concept of the subtle body.

The manipura chakra is the third of the six chakras, which are generally enumerated from the bottom up.

It's shaped like a ten-petaled lotus and is positioned around the navel.

Each petal contains a seed, in this example the retroflex consonants "dha" to "pha." The manipura chakra is said to be the body's seat for the subtle element of fire, whose strength is said to aid digestion.

See Arthur Avalon (Sir John Woodroffe), Shakti and Shakta, 1978, and Philip S. Rawson, The Art of Tantra, 1973, for further details.


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Hinduism - What Is Manas In Hindu Philosophy?


 (“mind”) Manas is one of the phases in the devolution of prakrti (primal matter), culminating in the world we see around us, in which human souls are subject to reincarnation, according to the metaphysics of the Samkhya school, one of the six schools of Hindu philosophy (samsara).

Manas develops from the ahamkar stage, which is characterized by a first feeling of Self and subjectivity.

The mind (manas) develops as a source of intellectual activity, which, when combined with this sense of subjectivity, gives rise to the concept of individual identity.

According to the Samkhyas, the growth of the individual's sense organs (jnanendriyas) and action organs (karmendriyas), as well as the subtle components (tanmatras) that are the source of the world's material things, occurs simultaneously with the formation of mental identity.

Manas became widely acknowledged as one of the five human sense organs, despite the fact that following philosophical systems essentially rejected Samkhya cosmology.

The manas detects mental items (ideas) in the same way as the eye and ears sense sight and sound, enabling the person to experience them.


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Hinduism - What Is The Kundalini?


 (“spiral”) One of the most essential principles in tantra is kundalini, or the latent spiritual force that lives in everyone.

It is the most important component of the subtle body, an alternative physiological system that is said to exist on a separate level than coarse matter yet has certain similarities with it.

The subtle body is made up of six psychic centers (chakras), which are represented as multi-petaled lotus flowers that run down the spine and are linked by three vertical channels.

Human capabilities, subtle components (tanmatras), and holy melodies are all represented by the chakras.

The deity Shiva (consciousness) and the goddess Shakti (power), the two divine principles through which the whole cosmos came into existence, have physical abodes above and below the chakras.

The homology (or likeness based on a shared origin) of macrocosm and microcosm, a key Hindu doctrine revealed in the Upanishads, is the basic premise underpinning this idea.

The kundalini is a manifestation of the universal Shakti that exists in all humans; it is shown as a snake wrapped three times around the muladhara chakra, the lowest of the mental centers.

Although everyone has kundalini, it is normally inactive, as symbolized by its coiled condition.

The goal of the subtle body's religious disciplines (yogas) is to awaken and uncoil the kundalini, pulling it up via the subtle body's core channel (sushumna) and piercing through the chakras on its journey.

The ascension of Kundalini indicates the reawakening of spiritual force.

To prevent the seeker from unwittingly activating unmanageable powers, this awakening must be carried out under the direction of a guru.

The piercing of each chakra is said to bring either the removal of barriers or the emergence of new abilities.

The kundalini rises to Shiva's microcosmic realm, the sahas radalapadma at the summit of the head, when completely expanded, to join with Shiva in eternal pleasure.

See Arthur Avalon's (Sir John Woodroffe's) Shakti and Shakta, 1978; Swami Agehananda Bharati's The Tantric Tradition, 1977; and Douglas Renfrew Brooks' The Secret of the Three Cities, 1990 for further details.


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