Showing posts with label Rama. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Rama. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Is Vijaya In Hindu Mythology?



In Hindu mythology, Vijaya is one of Vaikuntha's gate guards, who, along with his brother Jaya, is cursed by the sage Sanaka to be born three times as an asura (demon) and destroyed by Vishnu each time.




Jaya and Vijaya incarnate as Hiranyaksha and Hiranyakashipu in their first births, respectively, and are murdered by the Boar avatar and the Man-Lion avatar.








They have a second Earthly incarnation, Ravana, and Kumbhakarna, who are murdered by Lord Vishnu incarnate as Rama.



Next, they take on the forms of Shishupala and Dantavaktra, who are murdered by Lord Krishna, this being their last birth for now.



They resume their responsibilities as Vishnu's guardians after their last slaying at the Lord's hands. It is believed they are yet to fully atone and extinguish the energy of the sage's curse. As a result, they will take birth yet again, only to suffer and be slaughtered by Lord Kalki for the final time. 


~Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - What Is The Hindu Practice Of Worship of Tools?

 



Ayudha Pooja is a ritual historically done by members of specific artisan communities on the festival of Dussehra.

There are two different charter stories associated with this celebration, both of which depict the victory of good over evil.

It is commemorated as the day when the hero Rama defeated the demon Ravana, as well as the Goddess's victory over a demon called Mahishasura.

For the craftsmen, such worship symbolizes the value of their instruments as a way of earning a living, and it is also thought that such propitiation would ensure prosperity the following year.

Weapons Worship is a term used to describe the worship of weapons.

On the holiday of Dussehra, a popular ritual among the warrior classes used to be performed (usually occurring within October and November).

There are two separate founding stories for this event, both of which celebrate the victory of good over evil.

It is commemorated as the day when the hero Rama defeated the evil Ravana, as well as the Goddess's victory over a demon called Mahishasura.

Given the martial tone of both charter stories, it's easy to understand how it'd be connected with soldiers and combat, and therefore a day to worship one's weapons as a symbol of the god.

According to traditional belief, any activity undertaken on this festival day would unfailingly succeed, hence Dussehra has long been a favorite day for military campaigns to begin.

Because Dussehra falls after the conclusion of the monsoon rains, when travel is practically impossible, it is also a good time from a strategic standpoint.


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Hinduism - Who Is Lord Vishnu In The Hindu Pantheon?

 


Vishnu meaning the “all-pervasive” in Sanskrit, is one among the three most powerful deities in the Hindu pantheon, with Brahma, Shiva and the Goddess.

All three are significant for being largely unmentioned in the Vedas, the oldest Hindu religious books, and their rise, as well as the progressive eclipse of the Vedic gods, indicates a marked change in Hindu religious life.

Vishnu is the one who appears most often in the Vedas among the three.

Many hymns that mention him refer to him as a helper to Indra, the major Vedic deity, and one of Vishnu's epithets is Upendra ("junior Indra").

He also appears as an autonomous actor in certain late hymns, linked with wonderful works for the benefit of the cosmos, such as measuring out the universe in three steps.

Vishnu is also linked to the sun, both in terms of his ability to travel through the skies and his ability to fall on (and therefore "observe") everything.

Vishnu is the sustainer or maintainer of the universe, according to the holy trinity of Brahma Vishnu-Shiva.

Vishnu is pictured reclining on the back of his serpent couch, Shesha, in the primordial ocean at the moment of cosmic disintegration in one of the most prominent creation myths (pralaya).

Vishnu's navel produces a lotus, which opens to reveal Brahma, the creator, who starts the creation process.

When the time comes for disintegration, the whole process reverses, and the cosmos is pulled back into Vishnu, who is therefore considered as the source of everything.

The cosmos is also sustained by Vishnu's avatars or incarnations, who come into the world to restore balance to a universe that has been dangerously out of balance, generally as a result of an out of proportionally powerful demon.

There are 10 avatars as far as we know.

The Fish avatar, Tortoise avatar, Boar avatar, and Man-Lion avatar are the first four in nonhuman forms.

The other six are in human form, frequently as sages or heroes: Vamana avatar, Parashuram avatar, Rama avatar, Krishna avatar, Buddha avatar, and Kalki avatar.

In each of these instances, Vishnu takes on a physical form in order to avoid tragedy and preserve the cosmos' purity.

The theory of the avatars served as a means of assimilating existing deities into the broader pantheon while still granting them distinct status.

Although most of the avatars are no longer objects of devotion (the Boar and Man-Lion avatars each had a significant following early in the common period), Rama and Krishna's adoration has entirely exceeded that of Vishnu himself in most of northern India.

Vishnu is still revered throughout southern India, especially among Shrivaishnavas.

Apart from the avatar idea, notable local deities like as Jagannath, Venkateshvara, and Vithoba have all been absorbed into the pantheon as manifestations of Vishnu.

Vaishnavas and Shaivas established sectarian rivalry in medieval Hinduism, both claiming supremacy over their own deities (Vishnu and Shiva).

Despite the fact that Vaishnavas see Vishnu as the universe's highest force, his legendary persona and activities are vastly different from Shiva's.

Vishnu's headgear is a crown, and his persona is that of an all-ruling monarch, but Shiva is linked with ascetic life and practices (tapas) and hence with the religious force created by such acts.

Vishnu frequently succeeds by guile, ingenuity, and deceit, but Shiva eliminates his mythological enemies with sheer might, which is devoid of any finesse.

Each deity's followers recognize their divinity as the supreme force in the cosmos, from which all other gods get their power, and both are portrayed as kind and caring to their worshippers (bhakta).


Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - What Is The Vinaya Patrika By Tulsidas?

 

 

Vinaya Patrika or a petition letter is a collection of 280 short poems written in the Braj Bhasha dialect by poet-saint Tulsidas (1532–1623?).


The entire work is presented as a letter of petition to Tulsidas' chosen deity, Rama, through the monkey god Hanuman, who acts as his intermediary.


The letter's main theme is a plea for deliverance from the current degenerate age's evils (kali yuga).


The first sixty-odd verses are a series of invocations to various gods, demonstrating Tulsidas' devotion's ecumenical quality.

The poem's remainder is addressed to Rama and emphasizes other themes that run throughout Tulsidas' poetry.


One of the themes is the kali yuga's corrupted nature, which makes devotion the only effective means of salvation.


Another pervasive theme is the incomparable power of God's name to rescue the devotee (bhakta).

Finally, the listeners are cautioned not to squander the gift of human birth.

Much of the poetry has an intensely personal quality to it, and it seems to reflect both the poet's despair and eventual hope for salvation.

The Vinaya Patrika is generally thought to have been written in the poet's later years, though it cannot be precisely dated, based on its general tone.



~Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - What Is Vijaya Dashami?

 

Vijaya Dashami is a Hindu festival commemorating the Lord's Victory Or Vijaya.("tenth victory")

Vijayadashami marks the culmination of Durga Puja in India's southern, eastern, northeastern, and some northern areas, commemorating goddess Durga's triumph over the buffalo monster Mahishasura to restore and defend dharma.

Lord Rama, Lord Vishnu's eighth avatar, is said to have vanquished the ten-headed monster Ravana in this famed Hindu festival. 

Lord Rama traveled to Ravana's realm with his brother Larkshman and devotee Hanuman to battle him and bring back Sita, Rama's wife.

 The holiday of Dussehra, which occurs on the tenth day of the lunar month, is known by another name.

According to Hindu mythology, Dussehra is celebrated after Navratri because Lord Ram is said to have worshipped Goddess Durga before embarking on his quest to slay Ravana, as advised by Lord Vishnu. 

The event commemorates Lord Ram's triumph over Lankan ruler Ravana (the 10-headed demon).

The festival has two mythological charters, one with the god Rama and the other with the Goddess, and both myths lead to this day as the day when the deity achieves ultimate triumph.


~Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - Who IS Rishyashringa In Hindu Mythology?

 


Rishyashringa  is a sage from the Ramayana, the first of India's two major epics.

Rishyashringa is tasked by King Dasharatha to make a significant sacrifice in order for the king's women to conceive.

A radiant figure comes from the sacrificial fire at the conclusion of Rishyashringa's sacrifice, lays a pot of milk-rice in front of Dasharatha, and tells him to give it to his wives.

Dasharatha distributes the contents amongst his three wives, Kausalya, Kaikeyi, and Sumitra, and they all have sons in due time.

Kausalya is Rama's daughter and the protagonist of the Ramayana.

Bharata's mother is Kaikeyi, while Lakshmana and Shatrughna's mother is Sumitra.


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Hinduism - Where Is Rishikesh In India?

 


Rishikesh  is a city and a holy location (tirtha) in Uttar Pradesh's Himalayan foothills.

Rishikesh is around fifteen miles up the Ganges River from Haridwar, India's holiest city.

Rishikesh, like many other places along the Ganges, is known mainly as a bathing (snana) destination, but it is also known as a haven for ascetics, notably at the ashrams in the region near Lakshman Jhula.

Rishikesh is also unique as a spiritual destination for having no specific charter myth.

According to legend, here is where the deity Rama kills numerous demons, allowing the sages to perform their offerings without interference.

According to another legend, here is where Rama does penance (prayashchitta) for slaying the demon-king Ravana.

In a third myth, Rishikesh is the location where a sage called Raibhya sees the divinity Vishnu.

Rama's brother Bharata is commemorated at Rishikesh's most renowned temple.


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Hinduism - Who Are Considered Rasik Or Rasik Devotees In Hinduism?


Someone who is intellectual and intelligent who can appreciate a developed artistic mood (rasa).

The term refers to a person who has translated this awareness of aesthetic mood into a devotional setting in the context of religious activity.

Rasik devotees (bhakta) would engage in intricate visualizations and mental accompaniments of their chosen god throughout the day.

These contemplative visualizations were thought to provide the devotee a feeling of involvement in God's presence on earth's divine drama (lila), sharpening his or her appreciation of it.

The Pushti Marg and the Ram Rasik Sampraday, whose objects of devotion were the gods Krishna and Rama, respectively, placed the highest emphasis on this talent.

This kind of devotion is nearly entirely devoted to these gods or other manifestations of Vishnu.


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Hinduism - What Is The Mohini Ekadashi?

 


Mohini Ekadashi is a festival celebrated on the eleventh day (ekadashi) of Baisakh (April–May), the bright, waxing half of the lunar month.

The event is devoted to the worship of Vishnu as Rama, his incarnation.

Most Hindu holidays have specific mandated ceremonies, generally requiring fasting (upavasa) and prayer, with specific rewards promised for faithful performance; honoring this festival frees one from the consequences of one's wicked conduct.


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Hinduism - Who Is Lakshmana In Hindu Mythology?


Lakshmana is one of King Dasharatha's sons with his wife Sumitra, and the younger half-brother of Rama, the epic's protagonist, in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics.

Lakshmana is the ideal younger brother throughout the Ramayana, living only to serve and assist Rama.

When Rama is exiled to the forest for fourteen years, Lakshmana follows him like a shadow the whole time, first as a forest ascetic, looking for Rama's stolen wife Sita, then fighting heroically in the battle with Ravana's army, and ultimately returning to serve Rama at his court in Ayodhya.

Many of the Ramayana's characters are archetypes for Indian cultural beliefs.

As with his brother Bharata, Lakshmana represents the perfect younger brother.

Brothers are the center of the joint family in northern India.

Sisters, on the other hand, stay at home after marriage and live with their married families.

Every generation's oldest brother ultimately ascends to the position of joint family leader.

The oldest brother, who has main authority and responsibility for the whole family, cannot thrive without the participation of his younger brothers, who must respect and support his authority.

Lakshmana is a devoted younger brother in his devotion to Rama and his full disregard for his own wants.

Lakshmana is far from faultless, despite his courage, heroism, and complete devotion to Rama.

He lacks Rama's tolerance and discernment, and he acts before he thinks.

When Bharata pursues the two brothers after they have gone into exile, Lakshmana assumes that Bharata is taking advantage of the chance to murder them in order to smooth his path to the throne.

Lakshmana plots to assassinate Bharata, but Rama's logic prevents a disaster.

Shurpanakha, a demon princess and sister of Ravana, Lanka's demon-king, is Lakshmana's most grievous blunder in judgment.

When she makes sexual approaches toward Lakshmana, he mocks her before mutilating her.

Ravana kidnaps Rama's wife, Sita, in order to exact vengeance on the brothers.

Lakshmana, like all the characters in the Ramayana, is neither good nor bad; he has many qualities as well as some serious defects. 


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Hinduism - Where Is Koshala In Hindu Mythology?


This is the name of the territory along the banks of the river Sarayu where Rama's father, King Dasharatha, ruled in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics. 


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Hinduism - Who Is Kaikeyi In Hindu Mythology?

 

Kaikeyi is the second wife of King Dasharatha, the mother of Bharata, and the foster mother of Rama, the epic's protagonist, in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics.

Kaikeyi is personally responsible for one of the epic's most heinous acts: forcing Rama into a fourteen-year exile in the forest, which is a crucial story point.

Despite her horrible deeds, she is not seen as a nasty person, but rather as a mother who acts out of love for her son but is plagued by poor judgment and bad advise.

Kaikeyi is overjoyed when Dasharatha declares that he plans to appoint Rama as the successor to the kingdom.

Rama has always held Bharata in the same regard as his own mother, Kausalya, and has regarded him as an equal.

Kaikeyi's psyche was steadily poisoned by her maid, Manthara, as the ceremony day neared.

Manthara persuades Kaikeyi that, after Rama is crowned heir-apparent, she and Bharata would be treated as chattel, or things, if they are permitted to live at all.

Kaikeyi's fear for her son drives her to take desperate measures.

Dasharatha had given Kaikeyi two boons, or gifts, for her assistance in winning a major battle many years previously.

She has never repaid these boons, but now asks that Dasharatha banish Rama to the wilderness for fourteen years and replace him with Bharata as king.

Dasharatha tries to persuade Kaikeyi to reconsider her decision, but she refuses.

Finally, he is obliged to give her desire.

Not only does Kaikeyi's request bring her shame from her husband, who blames her for separating him from Rama, but it also brings her shame from her kid.

Bharata chastises Kaikeyi for depriving Rama of something that is properly his, and he refuses to reign until Rama orders him to serve in his place during the exile.

Rama, who is depicted in the epic as serenely glad to accept his parents' orders, whatever they may be, is the only one who does not condemn her.


 


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Hinduism - Who Is Kausalya In Hindu Mythology?


Kausalya is the first wife of King Dasharatha and the mother of the god-king Rama in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics. 


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Hinduism - Who Is Kabandha In Hindu Mythology?

 


 ("trunk with no head") In the Ramayana (the older of the two major Hindu epics), a demon confronts the epic's protagonist, god-king Rama, and Rama's brother Lakshmana.

Kabandha was a monarch of the gandharvas, or heavenly musicians, in a previous incarnation, but his head was thrust down into his body after a fight with the god Indra.

When Kabandha asks for a way to eat, Indra inserts a mouth into Kabandha's stomach.

When Rama and Lakshmana chop off his arms, Indra promises him that the curse will be broken.

As Rama and Lakshmana seek a jungle for Rama's abducted wife Sita, Kabandha approaches them and grips each of them in one of his extended arms.

When they realize they can't get away, Rama and Lakshmana each slice off one of his arms, and Kabandha requests the brothels to burn his corpse with his dying breaths.

The gandharva king emerges from the flames in his former form and instructs the brothers to seek aid from the monkey-king Sugriva while the corpse burns.

 

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Hinduism - Who Is Indrajit In Hindu Mythology? What Does Indrajit Mean?

 


 ("Indra's Conqueror") Indrajit is the son of the demon-king Ravana and his wife Mandodari in the Ramayana, the earlier of the two major Indian epics.

He is presented as the son of the deity Shiva himself in some later versions of the Ramayana, having been born after his mother had married Ravana.

Indrajit, like his father, is a great Shiva devotee (bhakta), and as a result of his devotion, Shiva teaches Indrajit how to become invisible.

This ability is clearly incredibly useful to a fighter, and it allows Indrajit to conquer Indra's celestial kingdom and return Indra to Lanka as a prisoner, thus his name.

Brahma travels to Ravana's realm of Lanka to secure Indra's freedom, in exchange for which Indrajit requests physical immortality.

When informed that this is impossible, Indrajit seeks a different power: that if he makes a particular sacrifice, he would be given horses and a chariot, allowing him to kill every opponent he encounters while riding in the chariot.

Indrajit undertakes this sacrifice as the god-king Rama and his companions are invading Lanka in an attempt to reclaim Rama's stolen wife Sita.

Brahma warns Rama of the danger, so he sends his brother Lakshmana to stop it.

Lakshmana successfully disturbs the sacrifice and kills Indrajit in the subsequent struggle.

 


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