Showing posts with label Pushti Marg. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Pushti Marg. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Are Considered Rasik Or Rasik Devotees In Hinduism?


Someone who is intellectual and intelligent who can appreciate a developed artistic mood (rasa).

The term refers to a person who has translated this awareness of aesthetic mood into a devotional setting in the context of religious activity.

Rasik devotees (bhakta) would engage in intricate visualizations and mental accompaniments of their chosen god throughout the day.

These contemplative visualizations were thought to provide the devotee a feeling of involvement in God's presence on earth's divine drama (lila), sharpening his or her appreciation of it.

The Pushti Marg and the Ram Rasik Sampraday, whose objects of devotion were the gods Krishna and Rama, respectively, placed the highest emphasis on this talent.

This kind of devotion is nearly entirely devoted to these gods or other manifestations of Vishnu.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.




Hinduism - What Is The Pushti Marg?

 



Vallabhacharya (1479–1531) formed a religious community whose teachings have remained the sect's primary impact.

Vallabhacharya's philosophical viewpoint is known as "pure monism" (Shuddadvaita); his fundamental belief is that the deity Krishna is the Supreme Being and the ultimate source of everything that exists.

As a result, the earth and humans partake in his divine essence, although in limited ways, and the human soul is endowed with divinity as its inner light and controller.

Because Krishna is the ultimate source of everything, everything ultimately relies on God, the school's major religious focus is on God's grace.

This blessing is said to nourish (pushti) the devotee (bhakta) and is best obtained via devotion (bhakti), which is seen to be the only successful religious method.

Because of this focus on grace and devotion, the Pushti Marg has placed little emphasis on abstinence or sacrifice, and Vallabhacharya's followers mostly came from prosperous merchant groups.

In the Pushti Marg's temples, the emphasis on devotion was quickly expressed in beautifully structured forms of image worship.

Devotees would imagine themselves as Krishna's companions throughout his everyday activities—waking, eating, bringing his cows to pasture, returning home, and so on—and so be able to participate in the divine drama (lila).

The emergence of large liturgical materials, composed by eight poets (the ashtachap) affiliated with Vallabhacharya and Vitthalnath, his son and successor, aided this focus on vision and participation.

Vitthalnath's son Gokulnath, the group's third head, further cemented the growing community, whose main holy place is currently at Nathdwara, Rajasthan.

R.K. Barz, The Bhakti Sect of Vallabhacharya, 1976, is a good source of information.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.




Hinduism - Who Is Parmananddas?

 


Parmananddas (early 16th c.) One of the ashtachap, a group of eight bhakti (devotional) poets from northern India.

The Pushti Marg, a religious society whose members are Krishna devotees (bhakta), utilised the works of these eight poets for liturgical reasons.

All eight are also identified as members of the community and companions of either the community's founder, Vallabhacharya, or his successor, Vitthalnath, in the Pushti Marg's sectarian literature.

Although legend claims that Parmananddas was a Kanaujia brahmin, nothing is known about him, and the corpus of poetry ascribed to him is considerably bigger in later sources, indicating that his name was adopted by subsequent poets.

According to the evidence from the oldest texts, he was a devout devotee of Vallabhacharya.

Much of his poetry is composed expressly for the Pushti Marg, such as songs in honor of Vallabhacharya or hymns to be repeated throughout the day for Krishna worship, a religiosity that came to characterize the Pushti Marg.

His writings have not been translated to date, perhaps due to their sectarian nature.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - Who Was Kumbhadas ?

 


Kumbhadas (early 16th c.) is one of the ashtachap, a group of eight bhakti (devotional) poets from northern India.

The Pushti Marg, a religious community whose members are Krishna followers (bhakta), utilized these poets' writings for liturgical purposes.

All eight poets are mentioned in the Pushti Marg's sectarian literature as members of the community and associates of either the society's founder, Vallabhacharya, or his successor, Vitthal nath.

Vallabhacharya is usually associated with Kumbhadas.

Kumbhadas is a mysterious figure who is said to have been born around 1469.

His poetry exemplifies Rupa Goswami's five modes of devotion, particularly the madhurya ("honest eyed") mode.

Madhurya uses the language of lover and beloved to depict the relationship between god and devotee, in which one has ardent love for the other.


Hinduism - Who Was Hariray Of The Pushti Marg Hindu Religious Society?


Hariray Gokulnath  (mid-17th c. - 1551–1640 C.E. ), the third guru of the Pushti Marg, a religious society established by his grandfather Vallabhacharya, was a well-known follower.

Hariray is Gokulnath's scribe in addition to being a student.

He is a commentator on the Chaurasi Vaishnavan ki Varta ("Account of Eighty-four Vaishnavas"), and he most likely composed the work under Gokulnath's supervision.

The lives of eighty-four Vaishnavas, or followers (bhakta), of the deity Vishnu are described in this work.

They were all colleagues and pupils of Gokulnath's father Vitthalnath or his grandfather Vallabhacharya.

The text's primary goal is to highlight the significance of the Pushti Marg and its leaders, rather than to offer biographical information about these individuals.

Aside from the Chaurasi Vaishnavan ki Varta, Hariray is credited with a number of poems, however they may be the work of a later person. 


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.