Showing posts with label Tanjore. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Tanjore. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Was Rajendra I Of The Chola Dynasty In India?

 

Rajendra I. (r. 1014–42) was a Hindu king who reigned from 1014 to 42.

The Chola dynasty achieved its pinnacle of strength during his leadership (and that of his father, Raja Raja), extended its dominance from the Tanjore area in Tamil Nadu, across southern India, and into Southeast Asia all the way to Malaysia.

Rajendra destroyed one of Bengal's monarchs in 1023, extending his kingdom all the way to the Ganges, but he was unable to maintain control over such a vast territory for long.

In order to keep control of commerce from China, he also conducted a campaign against the Shrivijaya Empire in modern-day Malaysia.

Rajendra, like his father, was a big supporter of temple construction and other public works of art, such as the huge temple at Ganga ikondacholapuran, which was erected to commemorate the victory that opened the route to the Ganges.


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Hinduism - Wh oWas Raja Raja Of The Chola Dynasty?

 

Raja Raja (r. 985–1014)   

The Chola dynasty achieved its pinnacle of dominance during his leadership (and that of his son Rajendra), extended its authority from the Tanjore area of Tamil Nadu to southern India and into Southeast Asia all the way to Malaysia.

The money that such authority provided to Raja Raja was used to create huge temples.

He is most known for the Brhadeshvar temple at Tanjore, which is devoted to Shiva, the "Great Lord."


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Hinduism - Where IS Kumbhakonam In India?

 

Kumbhakonam is one of the several temple towns in Tamil Nadu's Tanjore district, reflecting the territory's importance as the seat of the Chola dynasty's rulers.

Kumbhakonam is home to a number of major temples.

The temple structures, which are built in the Dravida architectural style, are of moderate height, occupy a vast area, and are encircled by a boundary wall with huge towers (gopurams) above each wall's central entryway.

The most prominent landmark in Kumbhakonam is a temple bathing (snana) pond, not a temple.

Every twelve years, a celebration is conducted in the tank, during which the water in the tank is said to become the Ganges.

In 1992, an estimated 400,000 people attended the event, with 48 individuals sadly died in a stampede.

The Swami Malai temple, one of the six temples dedicated to the deity Skanda, is located just outside of town.


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