Showing posts with label Hindu. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Hindu. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Was Chandragupta Maurya?

 












(r. 321–297 B.C.E.) Chandragupta Maurya  is the Maurya dynasty's founder. 



The youthful Chandragupta established his kingdom by deposing the last member of the Nanda dynasty and establishing his capital at Pataliputra, which is now known as Patna in Bihar. 




From there, he seized control of the Ganges River valley, proceeded south into the Narmada River basin, and then turned his attention to northern India, exploiting the power vacuum left by Alexander the Great's previous invasion. 






He defeated Alexander's commander Seleucus Nicator in combat in 303 B.C.E., then consented to a treaty that gave him vast swaths of modern-day Afghanistan. 


Despite the fight, ties between the two seem to have been cordial, since Seleucus Nicator sent Megasthenes, an ambassador to Pataliputra, who stayed there for many years. 


Chandragupta is said to have received advice from a great brahmin minister known as Kautilya or Chanakya, who is credited with writing the Arthashastra. 



Chandragupta abandoned his kingdom to become a Jain monk and died of ceremonial hunger, according to tradition. 






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Hinduism - Who Was Chandra Gupta II?











 Chandra Gupta II (r. 376–415 C.E.) was a Hindu emperor who reigned from 376 to 415 C.E. 



After his father, Samudra Gupta, and grandfather, Chandra Gupta I, he was the third in the Gupta dynasty's line of great emperors. 


Chandra Gupta II led the Gupta dynasty to its geographical apex. 

The Shaka kingdom in the Malwa area was ultimately defeated under his reign, and the Guptas thereafter ruled all of northern India and current Pakistan, as well as the Coromandel Coast all the way to modern Madras, through conquest or tribute. 





Between 350 and 550 C.E., the Gupta dynasty reigned in northern India, and their rule is linked to the development of Indian culture and the rebirth of Hinduism. 


Both were made possible thanks to the Gupta rulers, who are regarded as benefactors of fine culture as well as fervent Shiva worshippers (bhakta). 

This is particularly true of Chandra Gupta II, since Kalidasa, the greatest of the Sanskrit poets, is one of the main personalities connected with his court. 



Related to - The Shaka epoch.






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Hinduism - Who Was Chandra Gupta I?

 





Chandra Gupta I (r. 320–35 C.E.) was a Hindu emperor who reigned from 320 to 35 C.E. 



The Gupta dynasty, which had its capital at Pataliputra like the Maurya dynasty, is associated with the present city of Patna in the state of Bihar. 





The capital of the Guptas was subsequently relocated to Allahabad. 

The Guptas ruled all of northern India and modern Pakistan during the reign of Chandra Gupta II (r. 376–415), as well as the Coromandel Coast all the way to modern Madras. 




Between 350 and 550 C.E., the Gupta dynasty reigned in northern India, and their rule is linked to the development of Indian culture and the rebirth of Hinduism. 

Both were made possible thanks to the Gupta rulers, who are regarded as benefactors of fine culture as well as fervent Shiva worshippers (bhakta). 




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Hinduism - What Is The Chandogya Upanishad?

 





The Chandogya Upanishad is a Hindu scripture. The religious writings that make up the most recent layer of the Vedas include the Brhadaranyaka Upanishad, one of the two oldest upanishads. 






Internal textual reasons suggest that the Brhadaranyaka Upanishad is the elder of the two, and since significant parts of both texts are identical, the Chandogya Upanishad is believed to be reliant on it. 







Both writings are likewise considerably longer and less structured than the other upanishads, meandering from subject to topic with no clear purpose. 






Both are written in prose rather than poetry, and the material is often presented as a conversation between many characters. 





Their very speculative debates on the nature of the cosmos were significant sources for subsequent upanishads. 





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Hinduism - What Is Chandiprakasha?

 





 ("Chandi effulgence") The spear of the Atala akhara, a specific group within the Naga class of Dashanami Sanyasis, is known by this name. 



The Dashanami Nagas are Shiva worshippers (bhakta) who are organized into akharas, or regiments, similar to an army. 



The Nagas' main profession until the beginning of the nineteenth century was as mercenary warriors, but they also had significant trade interests. 

In modern times, these roles have virtually vanished. 

The Atala akhara is symbolized by this specific spear, which is used by all of the akharas to express their organizational identity. 






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Hinduism - Who Is Chandika?

 




 

 A variation of the term Chandi, which refers to the Goddess's most powerful and frightening manifestation. 





Chandika is one of the Navadurgas, or "nine [forms of the goddess] Durga," who are adored throughout the Navaratri festival's nine nights. 






Chandika is the most powerful of these heavenly forms, since she is adored during the festival's ninth and last night. 












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Hinduism - Who Was Chandidas?

 


 

 

Bengali poet and devotee (bhakta) of the deity Krishna (15th century C.E.). 



Chandidas utilizes Sanskrit love poetry traditions to convey devotion to Krishna in his works, most frequently via the character of Radha as Krishna's favorite follower and lover. 






His lyrics are still sung in Bengal, and he was adored by Chaitanya, the Bengali devotee who founded the Gaudiya Vaishnava religious group, according to legend. 

Despite his poetry's enduring popularity, nothing is known about Chandidas' personal life. 

A Bengali poet of the Sahajiya sect, who composed many centuries after the original Chandidas and whose poetry is clearly differentiated by ideological differences, adopted the same name. 



Edward C. Dimock Jr. and Denise Levertov (trans. ), In Praise of Krishna, 1981, contains excerpts from Chandidas' poetry. 



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Hinduism - Who Is Chandi?

  



 (“aggressive”) Durga and Kali are two ferocious and strong deities who are given this epithet. 


Chandika is a variant form of Chandi, and it is under this name that Chandi is recognized as one of the Navadurgas, the "nine [forms of the goddess] Durga" adored during the Navaratri festival's nine nights. 


Chandika is the most powerful of these heavenly forms, since she is adored during the festival's ninth and last night. 







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Hinduism - What Are The Chandas?

 




 

Chandas Are One of the Six Vedangas. 



These were supplementary areas of knowledge designed to make the Vedas, the earliest Hindu sacred scriptures, easier to utilize. 


Chandas was interested in the study of metrical forms of poetry, which were important in the Vedic literature. 

The term chandas is employed to identify the Vedas itself in various texts (such as Panini's grammar, the Ashtadhyayi), indicating the significance of meter. 



Shiksha (proper pronunciation), vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar), kalpa (ritual instructions), nirukta (etymology), and jyotisha are the other Vedangas (auspicious times for sacrifices). 



Northern Indian dynasty that ruled most of the Ganges River valley and northern Madhya Pradesh in its peak (10th–14th centuries C.E.). 

The Chandellas are known for their beautiful temples in the hamlet of Khajuraho, which they constructed mostly during the eleventh and twelfth centuries. 

Due to their distant and inaccessible position, these temples have survived to the current day. 

They are world-famous for their incredible exhibition of sexual sculptures and are outstanding examples of the Nagara architectural style in its mature state. 



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