Showing posts with label Tulsidas. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Tulsidas. Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Is Bapu Morari?

 


Bapu Morari (born Muraridas Prabhudas in 1946) is a modern Ramcharitmanas commentator and expositor (kathava cak).

The Ramcharitmanas is a vernacular rendition of the Ramayana, the older of the two major Sanskrit epics, written by the poet-saint Tulsidas.

Tulsidas did not just translate Valmiki's Sanskrit epic, but altered it to meet his own religious concerns, particularly the significance of devotion (bhakti) to God, one of the text's fundamental themes, as with all vernac ular versions of the Ramayana.

Morari Bapu claims no supernatural abilities or capabilities; his religious popularity is completely based on his devotion to the scripture and his ability to expound it.

He has given katha (discourse) to Hindu diaspora populations in Europe and North America, as well as in India, at times to audiences of over 100,000 people.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - Who Is Manthara In Hindu Mythology?

 

Manthara is the hunchbacked maid of King Dasharatha's wife, Kaikeyi, in the Ramayana, the older of the two major Indian epics.

Kaikeyi's mind is steadily poisoned by Manthara's whisperings against Dasharatha's son Rama, the god-king who is the epic's protagonist.

She persuades the queen that if she and her son Bharata are permitted to survive after Rama is crowned Dasharatha's heir, they would be no better than slaves.

Kaikeyi is persuaded by Manthara to claim two boons that Dasharatha granted her years ago.

With the first boon, she orders Rama to be exiled to the jungle for fourteen years, and with the second, she orders Rama's son Bharata to be anointed heir in his stead.

The earliest version of the epic, Valmiki's Ramayana, portrays Manthara as a true villain.

Although, given the concept in karma, her physical impairments would have been perceived as showing moral and spiritual deformities as well, there is little explanation for her behavior.

Manthara's actions is finally attributed to the gods in the Ramayana, authored by the poet-saint Tulsidas (1532–1623? ), who send the goddess Saraswati to muddle Manthara's mind, putting in motion the sequence of events leading to the demon Ravana's destruction.

Tulsidas, in typical Tulsidas manner, gives the incident a more altruistic spin, linking it to Rama's ultimate reason for being born on Earth.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - What Is The Kavitavali?


 ("poems in a sequence") The poet-saint Tulsidas (1532–1623?)'s last poetry composition.

Tulsidas presents a simplified version of the epic Ramayana as well as poetry in which he clearly speaks in his own voice in the Kavitavali.

It was finished after 1615, according to evidence in the text.

The poems are composed in the savaiya and kavitt meters, which are lengthier, more difficult, and less accessible than Tulsidas' earlier works' meters.

The Kavitavali is structured into seven divisions, which correspond to the Ramayana's internal structure, however the Kavitavali's verses are concentrated in the final two sections.

The "Lankakhand," for example, portrays the ultimate battle symbolizing the conflict between good and evil; the kavitt meter is utilized to convey spectacular war scenes in this portion.

The last volume is "Uttarakhand," which accounts for more than half of the total work.

Tulsidas has written some autobiographical verses in this last section, and he repeats themes that can be found throughout much of his work: the degeneracy of the present age (Kali Yuga), a focus on devotion as the only means of salvation, and the power inherent in God's name, which can overcome any obstacles.

Parts of this last portion seem pessimistic, maybe reflecting the challenges of old age, yet there's a thread of optimism running through it all, implying that the author's faith in God's redemptive power will not be in vain.

 

You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - What Is A Katha Or Kathas?


 (“conversation”) Recitation and explication of a religious text are the foundations of this kind of public religious presentation.

The Ramcharitmanas, a rendition of the epic Ramayana penned by the poet saint Tulsidas, are most often linked with Katha, although it may also be used to explain other holy works.

Kathas may be presented in a variety of ways: the speaker can go through huge sections of the text, provide comprehensive analysis and commentary on a tiny segment of the text, choose passages from the text to exemplify a certain subject, or provide a wholly spontaneous and free-floating explanation.

Attending such concerts is not only aesthetically pleasant for listeners, but it is also seen as a type of satsang or religious fellowship.

These meetings were (and continue to be) one of the most important methods for illiterate people to remember huge portions of these core books.

For further detail, check Philip Lutgendorf's 1991 book The Life of a Text. 


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - What Is The Hanuman Chalisa?


Hanuman Chalisa (literally, "Hanuman's Forty").

In Hindi, forty poetry stanzas in honor of the deity Hanuman.

Tulsidas (1532–1623), well known as the composer of the Ramcharitmanas, a vernacular translation of the epic Ramayana, is credited with writing it, according to a signature line (bhanita) at the conclusion of the work.

Short poems like the Hanuman Chalisa are often sung as a devotional act or as an established element of worship, and many individuals can memorize the text off the top of their heads.

The passage is written in the chaupai meter, which is the Ramcharitmanas' most common meter.

Hanuman's physical characteristics are described first, followed by his devotion to Rama and his heroic acts in the Ramayana.

The last words reaffirm Hanuman's potency, promise advantages if the verses are spoken, and reclaim Tulsidas' longing for Hanuman to stay in his heart.

 

You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.