Showing posts with label panchamakara. Show all posts
Showing posts with label panchamakara. Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is Vira Or The Tantric "Hero"?

  

The Vira or "hero” is one of the ritual expression modes used in tantra, a secret, ritual-based religious practice.


The tantric "hero" is said to be someone who not only consumes the Five Forbidden Things (panchamakara) in their purest form, but also uses this inversion of normal moral rules to affirm the ultimate unity of all things in the universe.


Aspirants who adopt a heroic mode frequently worship a powerful but dangerous deity, with the ultimate affirmation of this unity being the affirmation of one's identity with that deity.

If one succeeds, various powers are said to be conferred, but if one fails, illness, insanity, or death are said to result.


This isn't a risk-free path, but it gets the heroes to their desired destination quickly.


~Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - What Is Panchamakara?

 


 "The Five Forbidden Things," or "the five m's," is a phrase that literally means "the five forbidden things": Tantra is a hidden, ritual-based religious system that uses a collection of five objects for devotion.

Madya (wine), Matsya (fish), Mamsa (meat), Mudra (fermented or parched grain), and Maithuna (fermented or parched grain) are the five names that begin with the letter "m." (copulation).

They are utilized in "left hand" (vamachara) tantra in their natural form, and in "right hand" (dakshi nachara) tantra through substitution.

All five are frowned upon by "respectable" Hindu culture (the final because it is considered adulterous), therefore their usage in tantric ritual must be seen in context.

The ultimate oneness of everything that exists is one of the most widespread tantric conceptions.

From a tantric viewpoint, affirming that the whole cosmos is one principle—often understood as the activity of a certain deity—requires the adept to abandon all dualistic ideas.

The "Five Banned Things" give a ceremonial manner of breaking down dualism, since the adept breaks society norms prohibiting intoxication, non-vegetarian eating, and illegal intercourse in a purposeful endeavor to sanctify what is not mally forbidden.

Tantric adepts argue that such ceremonial usage of banned objects demonstrates that their practice entails a higher level of exclusivity (adhikara) and is therefore superior to general practice.

See Arthur Avalon's (Sir John Woodroffe's) Shakti and Shakta, 1978; Swami Agehananda Bharati's The Tantric Tradition, 1977; and Douglas Renfrew Brooks' The Secret of the Three Cities, 1990 for further details.

~Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - What Is A Mudra (Intoxicants)?

 

Mudra is fermented or parched grain .

Fermented grain is the fourth of the "Five Forbidden Things" (panchamakara) in the secret ritual-based religious practice known as tantra.

In "left hand" (vamachara) tantric ritual, they are used in their actual forms, whereas in "right hand" (dakshinachara) tantric ritual, they are represented by symbolic substitutes.

Although fermented grain has toxicating properties, it is also said to be an aphrodisiac.

The use of intoxicants and/or sexual license is fiercely condemned in "respectable" Hindu culture.

As a result, the tantric usage of this chemical must be seen in context.

The ultimate oneness of everything that exists is one of the most widespread tantric conceptions.

To proclaim that the whole cosmos is one principle from a tantric viewpoint implies that the adept must reject all dualistic conceptions.

The "Five Forbidden Things" serve as a ritual for dismantling dualism.

In this ritual, the adept defies society norms by consuming intoxicants, eating nonvegetarian cuisine, and engaging in unlawful sexual activity in an attempt to sacralize what is generally banned.

Tantric adepts point to the ceremonial usage of banned objects as evidence that their practice entails a higher level of exclusivity (adhikara) and is therefore superior to ordinary practice.

See Arthur Avalon's (Sir John Woodroffe's) Shakti and Shakta, 1978; Swami Agehananda Bharati's The Tantric Tradition, 1977; and Douglas Renfrew Brooks' The Secret of the Three Cities, 1990, for further details.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.




Hinduism - What IS The Ritual Impurity Associated With Matsya Or Fish Consumption?

 


 (“fish”) Fish is the second of the "Five Forbidden Things" (panchamakara) in the secret ritual-based religious practice known as tantra.

They are utilized in their physical forms in "left hand" (vamachara) tantric ritual, but are represented by symbolic equivalents in "right hand" (dakshinachara) tantric ritual.

Because nonvegetarian food is severely condemned in "respectable" Hindu culture, its ceremonial usage must be seen in the light of the greater tantric setting.

The ultimate oneness of everything that exists is one of the basic tantric concepts.

To proclaim that the whole cosmos is one principle from a tantric viewpoint implies that the adept must reject all dualistic conceptions.

The "Five Forbidden Things" serve as a ritual for dismantling dualism.

In this ritual, the adept defies society norms by consuming intoxicants, eating nonvegetarian cuisine, and engaging in unlawful sexual activity in an attempt to sacralize what is generally banned.

Tantric adepts point to the ceremonial usage of banned objects as evidence that their practice entails a higher level of exclusivity (adhikara) and is therefore superior to ordinary practice.

See Arthur Avalon's (Sir John Woodroffe's) Shakti and Shakta, 1978; Swami Agehananda Bharati's The Tantric Tradition, 1977; and Douglas Renfrew Brooks' The Secret of the Three Cities, 1990 for further details.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - What Is Maithuna?


 (“copulation”) Sexual intercourse is the fifth and final of the Five Forbidden Things (panchamakara) in the secret ritual-based religious practice known as tantra; the panchamakara are used in their actual forms in "left hand" (vamachara) tantric ritual, whereas they are represented by symbolic substitutes in "right hand" (dak shinachara) tantric ritual.

Ritualized sexual intercourse is described in Hindu tantra as a symbol of the ultimate union of the deity Shiva and his wife Shakti in many religions.

The greater tantric context must be considered when looking at ritual sexuality.

The ultimate oneness of everything that exists is one of the most widespread tantric conceptions.

To proclaim that the whole cosmos is one principle from a tantric viewpoint implies that the adept must reject all dualistic conceptions.

The "Five Banned Things" give a ceremony for breaking down dualism; in this ritual, the adept defies society conventions prohibiting intoxication, nonvegetarian cuisine, and illegal intercourse in an attempt to sacralize what is generally forbidden.

Tantric adepts point to the ceremonial usage of banned objects as evidence that their practice entails a higher level of exclusivity (adhikara), and hence is superior to ordinary practice.

In certain versions of this rite, the lady is the initiate's wife, who is revered as a manifestation of the Goddess before intercourse.

In other circumstances, this ceremonial intercourse is misconstrued as adulterous, generally with a low-status lady, in order to emphasize the social boundaries that have been crossed.

This latter technique is now uncommon, at least in southern India, according to Brooks, where it is "almost unknown." 

See Arthur Avalon's (Sir John Woodroffe's) Shakti and Shakta, 1978; Swami Agehananda Bharati's The Tantric Tradition, 1972; and Douglas Renfrew Brooks' The Secret of the Three Cities, 1990 for further details.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.




Hinduism - What Is Madya? Why Is It Considered Ritually Impure? Who Is Allowed Madya?

 

 (“wine”) Wine is the first of the Five Forbidden Things in tantra, a secret ritual-based religious practice (panchamakara).

Because "respectable" Hindu culture forbids the intake of alcoholic drinks, its ceremonial usage in tantra must be understood in the context of tantra as a whole.

The ultimate oneness of everything that exists is one of the most fundamental tantric principles.

To proclaim that the whole cosmos is one principle from a tantric viewpoint implies that the adept must reject all dualistic conceptions.

One method to achieve this is to consume the "Five Banned Things," purposefully breaching cultural conventions prohibiting the intake of intoxicants, non-vegetarian cuisine, and illegal intercourse, and thereby making holy what is generally forbidden.

Tantric adepts point to the ceremonial usage of banned objects as evidence that their practice entails a higher level of exclusivity (adhikara) and is therefore superior to ordinary practice.

The intoxication generated by wine in its ceremonial use—which is normally in very tiny quantities—is an approximation of the ecstasy of enlightenment.

See Arthur Avalon's (Sir John Woodroffe's) Shakti and Shakta, 1978; Swami Agehananda Bharati's The Tantric Tradition, 1977; and Douglas Renfrew Brooks' The Secret of the Three Cities, 1990 for further details.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.



Hinduism - How Is Alcohol Consumption Perceived In A Hindu Society? What Are Instances Of Hindu Religious Exceptions That Tolerate Alcohol?

 

Traditional Hindus condemn it, however opinions vary depending on the sort of booze drunk.

Drinking beer, wine, and distilled spirits ("foreign liquor") is associated with embracing "foreign" Western ideals, but drinking un-distilled, fermented beverages like "country liquor" and toddy is associated with low-class conduct.

Drinking habits tend to reflect and perpetuate unfavorable attitudes.

People who drink will typically complete the bottle in one sitting and get inebriated, thereby "proving" that there is no such thing as responsible drinking since booze is banned in polite society.

Despite widespread cultural opposition, there are a few Hindu temples where whiskey is offered to the god on a daily basis.

As prasad, the sanctified food or drink that bears the deity's benediction, the devotees also get wine.

In certain tantric religious practices, alcohol has also been integrated into religious rites.

Tantra is a hidden ritual-based religious system founded on the notion that everything exists in ultimate oneness.

To proclaim that the whole cosmos is one principle from a tantric viewpoint implies that the adept must reject all dualistic conceptions.

Consuming the "Five Forbidden Things" (panchamakara) is one method to achieve this, purposefully breaching social conventions prohibiting the intake of intoxicants, nonvegetarian cuisine, and illegal intercourse.

This is always done in a precisely specified ritual environment, with the intention of sacralizing what is not morally wrong.


You may also want to read more about Hinduism here.

Be sure to check out my writings on religion here.