Showing posts sorted by relevance for query Kali. Sort by date Show all posts
Showing posts sorted by relevance for query Kali. Sort by date Show all posts

Hinduism - Who Is The Mother Goddess Kali?


 ("black") The Mother Goddess in an incomprehensibly ferocious and mighty heavenly aspect.

In its most frightening forms, Kali is the divine's horrible, uncontrollable power.

Her home is a cremation site, and she is often connected with imagery of blood, death, and devastation.

Her iconography depicts her as having several heads and limbs, as well as a thin, gaunt, and haggard figure with a lolling tongue and blood-smeared lips.

Surprisingly, millions of Kali's bhakta (devotees) refer to her as "mother." Kali's origins are unknown, however she is thought to be an autochthonous ("of the soil") goddess.

Her dark skin, which is linked with low social status, her affinity for living in remote locations, and her worship by Indian aboriginal tribes and individuals on the fringes of society all appear to indicate to her roots as a local deity, maybe of tribal people.

Some early Sanskrit operas, such as Bhavabhuti's Malatimadhava, mention violent deities who accepted blood gifts from their worshippers.

The Thugs were featured prominently in nineteenth-century fiction using the same idea.

The Devimahatmya, the oldest known source for the belief that God is feminine, has one of Kali's earliest descriptions.

The birth of Kali (in her Mahakali form) is described in one of the Devimahatmya events as the Goddess incarnate's fury.

Kali begins the myth by stuffing the demon armies into her mouth and devouring them whole, signifying her all-consuming ability to destroy.

In this book, she also defeats Raktabija, a demon who is granted the blessing that each drop of his blood that falls on the ground would instantaneously change into a clone of himself, making him almost unconquerable.

Kali defeats him by consuming his blood as it is shed till it runs out.

Both of these instances bolster her reputation as a terrifying and powerful goddess, as well as her proclivity for destruction and her links with drugs and acts that are generally deemed defiling.

As Kinsley points out, Kali may also be seen as a symbol for the inevitability of human existence, and that catastrophe and misfortune can strike without warning, despite the best-laid preparations.

Kali worship has taken two courses, one in accord with these gruesome visions and the other in opposition to them.

On the one hand, Kali has long been revered by practitioners of tantra, a hidden, ritual-based religious practice.

Reality, according to the tantras, is created by the interplay of polar opposites, personified by the deities Shiva (awareness) and Shakti ("power").

Shiva is the Ultimate Reality and provides the organizing principle, while Shakti is the energy and dynamism that makes things happen.

As a result, goddesses play a significant part in tantric practice.

Kali stands out among these goddesses, maybe because she is the most extreme expression of feminine power and hence can be perceived as wielding the most power on behalf of her adherents.

The representations of Kali standing over the prostrate Shiva, plainly in a dominating position, indicate her power over all things and Shiva's helplessness without it.

The tantric specialist is seen as a heroic character who obtains strength from the goddess in this faith.

The tantras also emphasize the reconciliation of opposites as a means of eradicating all mental dualism and affirming the ultimate oneness of the world.

Tantric rituals may involve acts utilizing generally banned substances, such as the Panchamakara, or "Five Forbidden Things," in order to underline the provisional nature of all purity and impurity judgements (ashaucha).

Kali is the ultimate tantric goddess since her iconography and story include activities that are generally considered unclean, such as consuming blood and accepting animal sacrifices, residing in a crematory, and dressing herself in severed limbs.

The adoration of Kali as a mother is another popular picture.

This image is dominant in the Bengal area, where it has grown well-established over the last several centuries.

Kali's image is based on Indian maternal imagery, which are highly idealized in terms of a mother's dedication to her offspring.

The basic concept is that if a devotee approaches Kali as a meek child willing to bear whatever blows she delivers, she would eventually direct her mighty energies to defend her follower.

The nineteenth-century Bengali celebrities Ramprasad and Ramakrishna are Kali's most renowned worshippers; the former is famed for a poem in which he claims that there are terrible children but never a bad mother.

This conflict between Kali's horrible demeanor and her image as a mother has been maintained by religious adepts such as Ramprasad and Ramakrishna, but it has mostly been lost in common devotion.

Kali is often shown as youthful, lovely, and even benevolent in modern depictions, which seek to sweeten or overlook her horrible qualities.

See David R. Kinsley's The Sword and the Flute (1975) and Hindu Goddesses (1986) for further information about Kali.

 


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Hinduism - What Is The Kali Yuga?

 


Kali Yuga One of the cosmic time reckonings assigns a certain age to the Earth.

Traditional thinking holds that time has no origin or conclusion, but rather alternates between cycles of creation and activity, followed by cessation and qui etude.

Each of these cycles lasts 4.32 billion years, with the active period known as Brahma's Day and the tranquil phase known as Brahma's Night.

The Day of Brahma is split into one thousand mahayugas ("great cosmic eras"), each lasting 4.32 million years, according to one accounting of cosmic chronology.

The Krta Yuga, Treta Yuga, Dvapara Yuga, and Kali Yuga are the four yugas that make up each mahayuga.

Each yuga is shorter than the one before it, ushering in a more degraded and wicked period.

Things have grown so horrible towards the conclusion of the Kali Yuga that the only remedy is to destroy and recreate the world, at which point the new Krta period starts.

The final of the four yugas, the Kali Yuga, lasted "just" 432,000 years.

It is also regarded as the most degenerate yuga, as seen by its association with iron—a metal that is sometimes helpful, sometimes detrimental, not very valuable, and whose black hue is linked to Saturn, the malicious planet.

The Kali Yuga is said to be the period when human evil is at its peak, virtue has all but vanished, and the world is inexorably breaking apart.

The Kali Yuga, according to Hindu belief, started with the start of the great conflict chronicled in the epic Mahabharata, and it is, unsurprisingly, the period in which we currently live.


 


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Hinduism - What Is Cosmic Time?

 


Cosmic Time. 


 Time has no origin or conclusion in ancient Indian cosmology. 

Instead, it alternates between creation and activity, followed by cessation and quietude, in a never-ending cycle pattern. 

As a result, the cosmos has no ultimate beginning or end—creation will always be followed by destruction, and then destroyed by a new creation. 

There are many distinct and sometimes conflicting methods for measuring cosmic time within the limits of this premise. 

The kalpa, or day of Brahma, is the most widely recognized unit of time, lasting 4.32 billion years. 

Although the cosmos undergoes recurrent renewals during this time, this is the final limit for the existence of the created world. 

The global dissolution (pralaya) occurs at the end of Brahma's day, when the world is entirely annihilated and reabsorbed into the deity Vishnu. 

Brahma's day is followed by an equal-length night, during which Vishnu is the sole living creature; the deity sleeps on the back of his snake couch, Shesha, which floats on the cosmic ocean's surface. 

A lotus grows from Vishnu's navel after Brahma's night is through. 

The deity Brahma emerges from the lotus, taking up the task of creation, and the circle of activity starts again. 

One of Brahma's titles is Svayambhu ("selfborn"), which refers to his spontaneous emergence at the beginning of each cosmic era. 

Unlike the Judeo-Christian notion of creation, Brahma does not create the world from nothing, but rather organizes and molds existing components into a unified and orderly universe. 

According to different theories, Brahma's day is divided into smaller parts. 

The four yugas, or cosmic eras, are by far the most popular scheme. 

The day of Brahma, according to this theory, is made up of one thousand mahayugas (“great cosmic ages”), each lasting 4.32 million years. 

The Krta yuga, Treta yuga, Dvapara yuga, and Kali yuga are the four component yugas of each mahayuga. 

Each one is shorter than the one before it, ushering in a more corrupt and perverted age. 

The four yugas are separated by a period of abrupt and spectacular rebirth at the start of the krta yuga, which is followed by a gradual and continuous fall. 

Although the kali yuga is the shortest of the four eras, it is also the period of greatest wickedness and depravity, during which any evil may be perpetrated. 

It is also, predictably, the time period in which we are now living. 

Things have become so terrible at the conclusion of the kali yuga that the only option is to destroy and recreate the planet, at which point the new krta period starts. 

Even though the kali yuga is the shortest, it lasts 432,000 years, and the yugas before it are two, three, and four times as long. 

The metals connected with each of the four yugas represent their progressive degeneracy: gold (krta), silver (dvapara), bronze (treta), and iron (iron) (kali). 

Another indicator is the human condition, which is believed to be becoming shorter, more wicked, and shorter-lived with each passing era. 

The four yugas paradigm provides little space in traditional Hinduism for the concept of development, since things will never be better than they are now, according to this theory. 

Rather than a utopian future, it idealizes a lost and unreachable past. 

The human and divine calendars are linked by an alternative method of calculating cosmic time, with one human year equaling a single day for the gods. 

The divine day is the six months when the sun travels north (uttarayana), and the divine night is the six months when it travels south (dakshinayana). 

A heavenly year will last 360 human years since an Indian solar year is 360 solar days. 

Brahma has a life span of 100 heavenly years, or 36,000 human years, after which the universe is destroyed and recreated. 

The Manvantaras, or Manu's ages, are a third system. 

The day of Brahma is divided into fourteen equal eras, each lasting little less than 309,000 years, according to this theory. 

Each era is distinguished by the divine sovereign (manu) who reigns at the time. 

None of these three systems are compatible, and there is no genuine attempt to reconcile them. 

This discrepancy suggests that their primary purpose was mythological, establishing a cohesive cosmic timeline and pattern rather than describing real occurrences. 

 



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Hinduism - Who Is Goddess Chamunda?

 





Chamunda Devi is the presiding deity of the Chamunda Devi temple on the banks of the Bana Ganga in Himachal Pradesh, and one of nine goddesses whose shrines may be found across the Shiwalik Hills. 



Despite the fact that each of these goddesses has her own identity, they are all regarded as different manifestations of the same Goddess. 




Chamunda's founding story is based on events described in the Devimahatmya, a Sanskrit book that depicts the Goddess in many incarnations and is the cult's oldest and most significant mythological source. 





The goddess Ambika's rage manifests as the fearsome goddess Kali, who marches into battle against the demon generals Chanda and Munda, whom she ultimately beheads, according to the Devimahatmya's eighth book. 



The goddess is revered as Chamunda at the Bana Ganga temple because it symbolizes the spot where both Chanda and Munda were destroyed. 



Chamunda is the name of a ferocious and deadly deity who is often associated with the goddess Kali. 

The heroine, Malati, is abducted by followers (bhakta) of the goddess Chamunda and given as a human sacrifice to her in Bhavabhuti's eighth-century play Malatimadhava. 

The drama's developments mirror the ambiguity with which such strong goddesses—and their devotees—have been seen in the past. 





In the Devimahatmya, the Sanskrit book that is the oldest and most significant mythological source for the Goddess's worship, Chanda is a demon general slain by the Goddess. 


The Goddess is depicted in this literature in a variety of forms. 

The goddess Ambika's rage manifests into the terrible goddess Kali in the seventh book. 

Kali assaults Chanda and his partner Munda's demon forces, and after defeating the army, she beheads the two generals. 

Chamunda, as the killer of Chanda and Munda, is one of the titles by which the Goddess is revered as a monument to this legendary act. 









See David R. Kinsley's Hindu Goddesses (1986) and Kathleen Erndl's Victory to the Mother (1993) for further details. 















Hinduism - What Is The Devimahatmya?


 (“The Goddess's Greatness”) The religion of the Goddess as the highest divine power's oldest and most significant legendary source. 

The Devimahatmya is a portion of the Markandeya Purana, a major Sanskrit (holy language) literature that is generally thought to have been written in the Narmada River area in the fifth or sixth centuries. 

The Devimahatmya is famous for asserting that God is a woman. 

The previous Hindu tradition, in which female deities exist but are minor, has no obvious root for this concept. 

Because it appears fully formed in the Devimahatmya, this belief must have existed at some level, and the notion must have taken some time to grow before it reached its complete perfection in this work. 

The Durgasaptashati ("700 poems to Durga") is another frequent name for the Devimahatmya, which is a 700-verse book. 

A framing tale introduces the book, in which a monarch and a merchant, both tormented by worldly problems, seek sanctuary in the forest. 

They meet a guru there, who listens to each of their experiences and explains that Mahamaya (a Goddess epithet) is to blame for all of their problems. 

This is an appellation for the Goddess as the single force behind the cosmos and wielder of illusion. 

When prodded for further information, the sage relates three mythological stories, each depicting the Goddess's salvific activities. 

These three stories make up the majority of the book and serve as the foundation for Goddess worship. 

The first tale retells the legend of the demons Madhu and Kaitabha, who are created from the deity Vishnu's earwax during the cosmic dissolution era (pralaya). 

A lotus blooms from Vishnu's navel as the universe is created all over again. 

It begins by revealing Brahma, the creator-god, who is immediately threatened by Madhu and Kaitabha. 

Although the narrative of these two demons exists in Vishnu mythology, there are considerable differences in this rendition. 

Brahma asks for aid in all versions of the narrative, and Vishnu finally slays the demons. 

Brahma's song of appreciation in the Devimahatmya, however, is to the Goddess, who, in her guise as Yoganidra (“yoga sleep”), has lulled Vishnu into a cosmic coma, making him powerless to assist Brahma. 

The Goddess withdraws her power over Vishnu in response to Brahma's praise, and he wakes and slays the demons. 

The buffalo-demon Mahishasura is the focus of the second narrative, and he is so strong that none of the gods can defeat him. 

When the gods are recalling their defeats at the hands of the demon, each deity begins to emit a dazzling brilliance. 

This light condenses into a single luminous mass, from which the Goddess's form emerges. 

The Goddess is depicted in this tale as the concentrated essence of all the gods, making her superior to any of them. 

This concept is emphasized by each of the gods gifting her a replica of their weapons, implying that she wields all of their heavenly abilities figuratively. 

After a horrific struggle, the Goddess takes up arms against Mahishasura and his army and slays him. 

The Goddess is also shown as a warrior-queen in the third narrative. 

In this episode, she battles and defeats Shumbha and Nishumbha's demon armies, as well as their subordinates Chanda, Munda, and Raktabija. 

The violent goddess Kali, who breaks out from the Goddess's forehead as her fury embodied, makes her first appearance in this myth. 

By cramming the demon armies into her mouth and digesting them, Kali aids the Goddess in defeating the demon armies. 

Kali also aids in the defeat of the demon Raktabija, who has been given the request that everytime a drop of his blood falls on the ground, it would turn into a full-size replica of himself. 

This renders him invulnerable to traditional methods of assassination. 

By consuming Raktabija's blood before it hits the earth, Kali is able to counter this extraordinary ability. 

This narrative, like the second, includes extensive details of combat devastation. 

All of these tales portray the Goddess as the highest celestial being, considerably superior to the pantheon's male gods. 

The framing tale concludes with a long song of praise to the Goddess, as well as enumeration of the benefits of her adoration. 

Both the monarch and the merchant begin to worship her, and three years later, both of their wishes are realized. 

The monarch requests a bigger and impregnable realm, referring to the Goddess's ability to grant earthly desires. 

The merchant, on the other hand, asks for complete emancipation, demonstrating his understanding of her power over illusion and the ultimate spiritual objective. 

Thomas B. Coburn, Devi Mahatmya, 1984, is a good source of knowledge. 



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Hinduism - Who Is Nataraja In The Hindu Pantheon?

 


Shiva's incarnation as the "Lord of the Dance." The most renowned Nataraja picture may be seen at Chidambaram, Tamil Nadu's temple town.

The temple was built during the reign of Vira Raja (927–997 C.E.) and is dedicated to Nataraja.

The depiction of Nataraja, on the other hand, is well-known, especially in southern Indian bronzes from the Chola era (9th–13th centuries).

One of Shiva's most fundamental qualities as a god is that he transcends all duality; the Nataraja picture represents this notion.

Shiva dances in a circle of fire, which represents birth and death, yet he is unaffected by these powers.

Shiva's matted hair sway wildly as he dances, revealing the power of his action, yet his countenance remains emotionless and undisturbed.

One of his four hands is occupied by the creation drum, while the other is occupied by the destruction fire.

His third hand is raised palm upward in a "fear not" gesture.

The fourth point is to his upraised foot, which is a sign of heavenly kindness and shelter for the devotee (bhakta).

His other foot smashes a demon, demonstrating his ability to exorcise evil.

The picture is a well-crafted theological message that can be "read" by people with the necessary skills.

Shiva and Kali, the goddess, seek to settle their rivalry with a dancing competition in Nataraja's founding tale.

Shiva eventually triumphs over Kali by emerging as Nataraja and performing an athletic (tandava) dancing style that Kali is unable to imitate due to her feminine modesty.

Regardless of its mythic origins, Chidambaram's Nataraja temple has been a major center for traditional Indian dance for over a thousand years.

Relief sculptures illustrating the 108 fundamental dance positions can be seen on the temple's eastern wall (karanas).

These postures are crucial in traditional Indian dance, especially in the Bharatanatyam school, which is Tamil Nadu's most popular dance form.

~Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - Who Is Munda In Hindu Mythology?

 



In the Devimahatmya, a Sanskrit work that is the oldest and most significant legendary source for the Goddess's devotion, the Goddess kills a demon general.

The Goddess is depicted in this literature in a variety of forms.

The goddess Ambika's rage manifests into the frightening goddess Kali in the seventh book.

The demon forces headed by Munda and his sidekick Chanda are attacked by Kali.

Kali beheads the two generals after defeating the army.

The Goddess is known as Chamunda, the killer of Chanda and Munda, as a remembrance to her legendary feat.


~Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - Who Is Goddess Kalika Devi?

 

Name of both a shrine and its presiding goddess in the Shiwalik Hills (foothills of the Himalayas).

Kalika Devi is one of the Shiwalik deities and is said to be a manifestation of Kali.

The temple is located in the town of Kalka, which is located on the route between Chandigarh and Simla.

The figure of Kalika Devi, like that of many other Shiwalik deities, is a natural stone outcropping.

This is regarded as the Goddess's self-manifested (svayambhu) form.

Unlike many other Shiwalik goddesses, the Hindi literature on this shrine does not state that it is part of the Shakti Pithas, a network of holy locations related mythically as places where a body part of the dismembered goddess Sati fell to earth.

Instead, the literature praises the temple for its grandeur and might.

Local priests identify it as the location where Sati's hair fell to earth, according to the literature.

This demonstrates both the power of pamphlet literature in directing pilgrim traffic and the importance of connecting one's place to the Shakti Pithas' network.

Kalika Devi's head is said to be the protrusion of stone that creates her appearance.

Kali assumed the guise of a lovely lady and came to the temple to perform celebratory songs during the Navaratri festival, according to legend.

Her voice and attractiveness had such an impact on the local king that he asked her to marry him.

Kali was enraged by the king's remark and cursed him to lose his realm.

She also forced the temple image to begin sinking into the dirt as a symbol of her anger.

She permitted the image's head to stay exposed at the request of an enthusiastic follower.

 

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Hinduism - What Is Dvapara Yuga?


 is the fourth epoch of the Hindu calendar.

One of the cosmic time reckonings assigns a certain age to the Earth. 

Traditional thinking is that time has no origin or conclusion, but rather rotates between cycles of creation and activity, followed by halt and silence. 

Each of these cycles lasts 4.32 billion years, with the Day of Brahma being the active period and the Night of Brahma being the tranquil phase. 

The Day of Brahma is split into one thousand mahayugas ("great cosmic eras"), each lasting 4.32 million years, according to one accounting of cosmic chronology. 

The Krta Yuga, Treta Yuga, Dvapara Yuga, and Kali Yuga are the four component yugas (units of cosmic time) that make up each mahayuga. 

Each of these four yugas is shorter than the one before it, ushering in a period of greater degeneration and depravity. 

Things have grown so horrible towards the conclusion of the Kali Yuga that the only remedy is to destroy and recreate the world, at which point the new Krta period starts. 

The Dvapara Yuga, which lasts 864,000 years, is the third of four yugas that make up a mahayuga. 

Bronze is the metal linked with the Dvapara yuga, which is less valued than gold and silver from previous eras but superior than the Kali yuga's iron. 

This is widely thought to be the cosmic era when the deity Krishna first came on Earth. 



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Pranayama - Kundalini Ascension And Vayus



After meditation and health/life extension, the function of the apana vayu as a motor for Kundalini-rousing is the third major area where the vayus are discussed. 


  • The main vayus, with the exception of apana, either travel upwards (prana vayu, udana vayu) or are directionless (samana and vyana vayus). 
  • The apana vayu, with its powerful downward flow, is primarily responsible for life force depletion and keeping us bound to our animal nature. 
  • Apana has a significant effect on vocabulary, resulting in an overuse of faeces and sexual phrases. 
  • If we turn up our apana, we may leave our animalistic side behind and embrace the Divine, according to yoga. 


The mixing of prana and apana in kumbhaka at the Manipura Chakra causes the Kundalini to rise. 

In ancient writings, this is a common topic. By using Mula Bandha in Siddhasana, Sage Yajnavalkya taught to his wife, Gargi, how to send apana on an upward trajectory. 

  • The fire must be fanned after it reaches the Manipura Chakra (the fire chakra) by pulling prana vayu down. 
  • The snake Kundalini's tail will be bummed by the fire, and the serpent will ascend through the chakras, propelled by the twin forces of apana vayu and fire. Kundalini is said to be awakened by apana with fire and moves up like a snake, according to Sage Vasishta. 
  • Raghuvira goes into more depth in his Kumbhaka Paddhati/4, which is dedicated exclusively on pranayama. 


Mastery of apana (apana jaya), he claims, would lead to mastery of mula bandha (root lock), mudras (energy seals), dharana (concentration), agni (fire), Kundalini rising, and an increase in sattva guna (intelligence). 

Here are a few explanations: 

  • Apana (vital down current) and mula bandha (root lock) are almost interchangeable. 
  • The mastery of one will lead to mastery of the other. 
  • The stoking of agni will follow mastery of apana (fire). 
  • Toxins will be absorbed by a powerful agni, which will improve health. Kundalini is roused by a powerful agni and a tilted apana. 


When a diligent practitioner raises Kundalini, the yogi will be able to practice dharana (concentration) and then the other higher limbs. 


It's important to note that in more contemporary texts (i.e. those from the Kali Yuga), the word Kundalini refers to what Patanjali meant by dharana. 

  • Humanity was more intellectually and philosophically oriented during Patanjali's era (Dvapara Yuga). 
  • Patanjali's concept of dharana, which was generally recognized at the time, was the capacity to tie the mind to one location for three hours. 
  • People in our present era, the Kali Yuga, are much more physically oriented, therefore yogis searched for a physical meaning of the word dharana. 
  • Dharana, or tying the mind to a sattvic (holy) meditation object for three hours, was only feasible when the prana was elevated to the upper chakras, according to yogis. 
  • If prana is restricted to the lower chakras, one will express themselves in terms of survival (Muladhara Chakra), sexual identity (Svadhishthana Chakra), or absorption of money, food, and things (Svadhishthana Chakra) (Manipura Chakra). 


Kundalini is the term given to Prana as it rises. 


  • The Kali Yuga's physically oriented yogis sought for methods to elevate Kundalini in order to strengthen dharana. 
  • The route of air and the path of fire, or the usage of both at the same time, are two of the most common methods to raise Kundalini. 
  • 'Path of fire' refers to cleansing and stoking agni (fire). 
  • The term "path of air" refers to raising the apana vayu and utilizing it as a motor to raise Kundalini.
  • Remember that apana is the only vayu current that firmly points down. 
  • If it is turned upwards, all of the vayus will suck up Kundalini like a big vacuum cleaner, and this is what the route of air refers to. 
  • According to the Yoga Kundalini Upanishad, Mula bandha is used to elevate apana, which usually flows downward. 
  • According to the Upanishad, apana ascending up will mingle with agni, and the two will rise together to the Manipura Chakra. 
  • They will join with prana vayu (vital up stream) here, and Kundalini will ascend up via the sushumna, sucked up by the vayus and lit by agni (notice that the English term ignite is derived from the Sanskrit agni = fire). 


In a nutshell, this is how the more contemporary yoga shastras explain how to attain dharana (scriptures). 

However, it just repackages old ideas in a more contemporary language. 

The word sushumna, which refers to the core energy conduit and the route for Kundalini ascension, was first used in the Chandogya Upanishad/9, which predates the Yoga Sutras by centuries. 

I've gone into great length to demonstrate that there isn't a yoga of the Vedic seers, a yoga of the ancient Upanishads, a classical yoga of Patanjali, and a more contemporary yoga of the Hatha Yoga, as some Western academics claim. 

This isn't the case at all. There has been a continuous, consistent history of sages and siddhas who have experienced the same mystical experience for thousands of years. 

What changed was the audience's ability to comprehend the lessons. 

As a result, the same mystical experience was clothed in various languages and modified using diverse techniques to reach an audience whose makeup had changed throughout the millennia.


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Hinduism - What Is The Kalimath?

 

Kalimath - (“Kali's Residence”) In Uttar Pradesh's Himalayan mountains, there is a village and a holy spot (tirtha).

Kalimath lies roughly ten kilometers from Guptakashi on a minor tributary of the Mandakini River; the Mandakini is one of the Himalayan tributaries that merge to form the Ganges.

Kalimath is one of the Shakti Pithas, a network of holy locations dedicated to the Goddess, according to local legend.

Each Shakti Pitha commemorates the location where a piece of the goddess Sati's severed body fell to earth and took on the shape of a new goddess.

According to local legend, Kalimath is the location where Sati's vulva landed.

It assumed the shape of the goddess Kali there, thereby linking a highly charged female bodily part with a strong and sometimes deadly Goddess form.

The Goddess image at the temple is a metal plate a little more than a foot square with a little triangle carved out in the middle, an aniconic emblem of the Goddess.

This plate is said to cover a pit—a clear sign of the portion of Sati's corpse that is said to have fallen there—but the region underneath it is considered so holy that peering beneath it is banned.

The notion that Kalimath is where Sati's vulva descended to ground exemplifies the Indian holy landscape's flexibility.

A far more commonly acknowledged tradition connects this specific body part to the Kamakhya temple in Assam.

Competing claims are widespread in the Indian holy landscape, since individuals typically create them to increase the holiness and status of their particular spot.

Many Hindus seem unconcerned by such apparent inconsistencies, presumably because they believe that a single Goddess is responsible for all of her many manifestations.




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Hinduism - What Is The Krta Yuga In Hindu Cosmology?

 

Krta Yuga is an epoch in Indian history.

One of the cosmic time reckonings assigns a certain age to the Earth.

Traditional thinking holds that time has no origin or conclusion, but rather alternates between cycles of creation and activity, followed by cessation and qui etude.

Each cycle lasts 4.32 billion years, with the active period being known as the Day of Brahma and the tranquil phase being known as the Night of Brahma.

The Day of Brahma is split into one thousand mahayugas ("great cosmic eras"), each lasting 4.32 million years, according to one accounting of cosmic chronology.

The Krta Yuga, Treta Yuga, Dvapara Yuga, and Kali Yuga are the four yugas that make up each mahayuga.

Each of the four yugas is shorter than the one before it, ushering in a period that is more decadent and depraved than the one before it.

Things have grown so horrible towards the conclusion of the Kali Yuga that the only remedy is to destroy and recreate the world, at which point the new Krta period starts.

The Krta Yuga is the earliest of the four yugas, and it is also the longest, lasting 1,728,000 years.

It is also regarded as the best of all the yugas, with gold, the most expensive of all metals, as its emblem.

The side marked Krta was the one for the winning throw in an ancient Indian dice game, indicating the greatest available alternative.

People in the legendary descriptions of the Krta Yuga live exceedingly long lives, have enormous physical size, and are completely virtuous by nature.

 

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Hinduism - Where Is The Muktinath Temple Located?


The temple is at approximately 13,000 feet at the foot of Annapurna, Nepal's tallest peak, and is a holy location (tirtha) at the headwaters of the Kali Gandaki River.

Both Hindus and Buddhists revere Muktinath, and each maintains a temple there.

The Buddhist temple is constructed atop a natural gas vent, which when fired emits a flame.

The Vishnu temple is constructed above a natural spring that is channeled outside the temple by 108 spouts styled like cow heads.

The riverbed of the Kali Gandaki is also a rich source of fossilized black ammonite, making it spiritually significant.

This ammonite, known as the shalagram, is a self-manifestation (svayambhu) form of Vishnu.


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Hinduism - Who Is Kalidasa?


 (fifth century?) He is widely regarded as the greatest Sanskrit writer, known for his knowledge of the language as well as his ability to elicit lyrical feeling (rasa) in his listeners.

There is little definitive information concerning Kalidasa's life; even his birth and death dates have been disputed.

Kalidasa was an ignorant rural kid, according to folklore.

He was portrayed as a suitor for an educated princess who had promised to marry only a man who could beat her in a silent argument—that is, a discussion in which gestures were used instead of words—as a joke.

Through happenstance and mutual misinterpretation, Kalidasa "defeated" the princess and married her.

When the princess discovered Kalidasa's illiteracy, she kicked him out of the home and told him he couldn't come back until he was educated.

In despair, he went to a temple dedicated to the goddess Kali and was ready to make a human sacrifice when Kali arrived and bestowed complete knowledge of Sanskrit onto him.

"Have you achieved competence in [Sanskrit] speech?" his wife is said to have questioned him upon his return.

"Asti kascit vagviseshatah?" says the narrator.

Kalidasa responded slowly, utilizing the three lines from his wife's query as the initial words of his three greatest works: Kumarasambhava, Meghaduta, and Raghuvamsha.

He's also the creator of the Abhijnanashakuntala, Vikramorvashiya, and Malavikagnimitra tragedies.

These writings are said to have earned him the favour of monarch Vikramaditya, whose court Kalidasa is typically connected with.

Kalidasa's extraordinary gift of learning is also said to have caused his death, according to legend.

Kalidasa saw his wife as his guru or religious instructor since she had sparked his interest in study.

He denied any sexual intercourse with her out of respect.

She cursed him to die at the hands of a woman, enraged at his rejection.

A king created a line of poem many years later and gave a great reward to the person who could write the finest finish.

While enjoying the company of a prostitute, Kalidasa learned about the competition and simply produced the ideal finish.

The courtesan stabbed and murdered Kalidasa in her desire for the reward.

Despite the fact that her crime was uncovered and she was punished, this narrative exemplifies Hindu belief in fate's inexorable force, especially when it is fueled by a curse.

 


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Hinduism - What Is The Vinaya Patrika By Tulsidas?

 

 

Vinaya Patrika or a petition letter is a collection of 280 short poems written in the Braj Bhasha dialect by poet-saint Tulsidas (1532–1623?).


The entire work is presented as a letter of petition to Tulsidas' chosen deity, Rama, through the monkey god Hanuman, who acts as his intermediary.


The letter's main theme is a plea for deliverance from the current degenerate age's evils (kali yuga).


The first sixty-odd verses are a series of invocations to various gods, demonstrating Tulsidas' devotion's ecumenical quality.

The poem's remainder is addressed to Rama and emphasizes other themes that run throughout Tulsidas' poetry.


One of the themes is the kali yuga's corrupted nature, which makes devotion the only effective means of salvation.


Another pervasive theme is the incomparable power of God's name to rescue the devotee (bhakta).

Finally, the listeners are cautioned not to squander the gift of human birth.

Much of the poetry has an intensely personal quality to it, and it seems to reflect both the poet's despair and eventual hope for salvation.

The Vinaya Patrika is generally thought to have been written in the poet's later years, though it cannot be precisely dated, based on its general tone.



~Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - Who Are The Mahavidyas?

 

A collective term for 10 strong and powerful Goddess manifestations.

According to legend, the goddess Sati takes on each of these forms in order to convince her husband, the deity Shiva, to let her attend a sacrifice performed by her father Daksha.


These 10 forms are all terrifying and terrifying, even to Shiva, demonstrating the Goddess's supremacy over Shiva.


  1. Kali, 
  2. Tara, 
  3. Chinnamasta, 
  4. Bhuvaneshvari, 
  5. Bagala, 
  6. Dhumavati, 
  7. Kamala, 
  8. Matangi, 
  9. Shodashi, and 
  10. Bhairavi are the 10 forms.


Some of these manifestations, particularly Kali, have risen to prominence as deities in their own right.

See David R. Kinsley's Hindu Goddesses, 1986, for further details.


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Hinduism - What Is A Mahayuga In Hindu Cosmology?

 


Mahayuga ia a cosmic time unit.

Time has neither origin or conclusion, according to traditional Hindu calculation, but instead alternates between cycles of creation and activity, followed by cessation and quietude.

Each of these cycles lasts 4.32 billion years, with the active period known as Brahma's Day and the tranquil phase known as Brahma's Night.

The Day of Brahma is split into one thousand mahayugas ("great cosmic eras"), each lasting 4.32 million years, according to one reckoning of cosmic chronology.

The Krta Yuga, Treta Yuga, Dvapara Yuga, and Kali Yuga are the four periods that make up each mahayuga.

Each one is shorter and more horrible than the one before it; towards the conclusion of the Kali Yuga, things have deteriorated to the point where the only solution is to destroy and recreate the world, at which point the next Krta Yuga starts.


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Hinduism - Who Is Nishumbha In Hindu Mythology?

 

In Hindu mythology, the name of a demon slain by the goddess Kali in the Devimahatmya, the Goddess's oldest and most significant scripture.

Nishumbha, along with his brother Shumbha, is a commander in the army of a demon called Mahishasura.

Shumbha and Nishumbha are able to defeat the gods and take possession of heaven thanks to a heavenly blessing provided to Mahishasura.

They are consumed, however, by Kali, who appears as a manifestation of the Goddess's wrath.

~Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - What Is The Kalivarjya?

 

A collection of roughly fifty-five deeds "must be avoided in the Kali [Age]," the final age in the cosmic time cycle after which it is said the world will be destroyed and rebuilt.

One of the tactics employed by brahmin academics to prohibit certain religious practices that were required in the holy writings but were no longer acceptable due to changing beliefs was to adopt this strategy.

Around the eleventh century C.E., the Kalivarjya restrictions first appear in manuscripts.

Certain animal sacrifices authorized in the Vedas (the oldest Hindu religious books) and suicide by a human suffering from a terminal disease were deemed permissible in ancient times but outlawed during the Kali period.

Pandurang Vaman Kane (trans.), A History of Dharmasastra, 1968, is a good source of knowledge.


 


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