Showing posts sorted by relevance for query Nabhadas. Sort by date Show all posts
Showing posts sorted by relevance for query Nabhadas. Sort by date Show all posts

Hinduism - What Is Bhaktirasabodhini?

 


(“Awakening the Delight in Devotion”) Bhaktirasabodhini. 


Priyadas wrote a commentary on the Bhaktamal of Nabhadas in 1712, and it is known as the Bhaktamal of Nabhadas Commentary. 


  • Nabhadas has included short six-line biographies of around two hundred current bhakti (devotional) personalities in the Bhaktamal. 
  • These biographies are notable for being devoid of extraordinary or miraculous occurrences, and instead emphasize the devotee's personal characteristics in order to serve as a role model for others. 



Priyadas elaborated on each devotee described by Nabhadas in the Bhaktirasabodhini, frequently giving incredible tales that Nabhadas had not addressed. 


  • Nabhadas relied on the writings produced by the biographer Anantadas in his biography of the poet-saint Ravidas, although his sources in other instances are unclear. 
  • Given Priyadas' propensity for miraculous occurrences and his chronological distance from his subjects, the stories in the Bhaktirasabodhini are dubious as authentic biographies of these saints. 


Nonetheless, the book is very important as a window into his day, and thorough examination may tell a great deal about current religious conflicts and problems.



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Hinduism - Who Was Nabhadas?

 

 



Nabhadas (c. 1600) was the author of Bhaktamal ("Garland of Devotees") .

He presents brief (six line) narratives of the lives of almost two hundred current bhakti (devotional) individuals in this hagiographical work, some from firsthand experience.

Despite the fact that Nabhadas identifies as a Ramanandi—a devotee (bhakta) of the deity Rama—his art is inclusive of devotees of all sectarian persuasions.

The poem is notable for its lack of supernatural happenings, and Nabhadas stresses the devotee's personal traits in order to serve as a role model for others.

The Bhaktamal is an important source for northern Indian literary and religious history since it provides the first accurate description of these personalities in many instances.

Despite its significance, the manuscript is difficult to date definitively, while internal evidence indicates it was finished in the early seventeenth century.


~Kiran Atma


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Hinduism And Hindu Theology - Who Was Anantadas?



Anantadas is a Hindu poet-saint from the late 16th century. 


  • Ravidas, Kabir, Namdev, Trilochan, Angada, and Pipa are among the most well-known northern Indian religious (bhakti) poet-saints for whom he composed "introductions" (parchais). 
  • Because Anantadas cites 1588 C. E. as the date of writing for his Namdev Parchai, his period may be determined with fair certainty. 
  • Anantadas lived at the same time as another renowned hagiographer, Nabhadas, whom Anantadas refers to as a "guru brother" to his own guru, thus making Nabhadas Anantadas' "spiritual uncle." 
  • Although both hagiographers offer important information, Nabhadas' descriptions are very short, and Anantadas' descriptions are extremely detailed. 
  • Although the wonderful occurrences contained in the introductions make them dubious as historical sources, Anantadas' writings are by far the first comprehensive descriptions of these literary giants. 



He is practically unknown since his complete works have never been published. David Lorenzen, Kabir Legends and Ananta-Das' Kabir Parachai, 1991; and Winand Callewaert and Peter G. Friedlander (trans. ), The Life and Works of Raidas, 1992.



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Hinduism - Who Was Mahipati?

 

Mahipati (1715–1790) was a Hindu ruler who lived from 1715 to 1790.

Mahipati was a writer and hagiographer of devotional (bhakti) poet-saints, particularly those associated with the Varkari Panth, to which he also belonged.

The Varkari Panth is a religious organization dedicated to the worship of the Hindu deity Vithoba, whose temple is located in Pandharpur, Maharashtra.

Mahipati was a government worker in his hometown, according to legend.

He was called to work one day after failing to do his regular worship.

Mahipati completed the task at hand, but then quit, promising to only employ his writing in the service of the saints.

Mahipati readily confessed that he drew a lot of his information about the saints from older writings, notably the Bhaktamal by poet saint Nabhadas.

He depicts each of his themes as a paradigm of devotion, much as Nabhadas did; the tales reaffirm and confirm the ability of dedication to conquer all difficulties.

The Bhaktavijaya and the Bhaktililamrta are his main writings; sections of the former have been translated by Justin E. Abbott as The Life of Eknath, 1981, and The Life of Tukaram, 1980; while the latter has been translated by Justin E. Abbott as Stories of Indian Saints, 1982.


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Hinduism - What Is A Bhaktamal?



Bhaktamal. (“Garland of Devotees”) 


Nabhadas (about 1600) wrote a text in which he provides brief (six-line) biographies of over two hundred bhakti (devotional) personalities. 


Despite the fact that Nabhadas was a Ramanandi, and therefore a devotee (bhakta) of the deity Rama, his work is often regarded as impartial and inclusive to devotees of all sectarian persuasions. 


  • Surprising and miraculous occurrences are absent from the book. 
  • Instead, the devotee's personal characteristics, which serve as an example for others, are emphasized. 
  • The Bhaktamal is an incredibly significant source for northern Indian literary and religious history since it often provides the first credible description of these people. 
  • It's even more intriguing since internal evidence indicates it was finished in the early seventeenth century.


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Hinduism - Who Was Pipa?



Pipa (15th century?) is a poet-saint in the Sant religious group.

Sant is an umbrella term for a group of poet-saints from central and northern India who share a number of common traits, including:

  1. A focus on individualized, interior religion leading to a personal experience of the divine; 
  2. Disdain for external ritual, particularly image worship; 
  3. Belief in the power of repeating one's patron deity's name; 
  4. And a willingness to ignore traditional caste distinctions.


Pipa was born into a Rajput royal family in the Malwa area, but he finally abdicated his kingdom and traveled to Benares to study under the poet-saint Ramananda.

Pipa was a follower of the mighty goddess Bhavani (an epithet of Parvati), according to the hagiographer Nabhadas, demonstrating the scope of the Sant tradition.

A couple of Pipa's lyrics have been preserved in the Adigranth, the Sikh community's holy scripture, and they are congruent with these traditions in terms of language and theological focus.


~Kiran Atma


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Hinduism - Who Is Nanddas?

 

(late 16th c.) One of the ashtachap, a group of eight bhakti (devotional) poets from northern India.

The Pushti Marg, a religious group whose members are devo ants (bhakta) of Krishna, utilised the writings of these eight poets for liturgical reasons.

All eight are also identified as members of the Pushti Marg's sectarian literature, as well as companions of either the community's founder, Vallabhacharya, or his successor, Vitthalnath.

Little is known about his life, although he is mentioned in the Bhaktamal, a seventeenth-century compendium of saints' biographies authored by Nabhadas.

Nanddas' poetry, like much of the poetry linked with the Pushti Marg, was centered on devotion to Krishna.

Extended poems on the ras lila and Uddhava's message are two of his most significant works, both written in lovely poetry.

Both of these concepts may be found in the Bhagavata Purana (10th century? ), Krishna devotionalism's most significant literature.

R. S. McGregor, The Round Dance of Krishna and Uddhav's Message, 1973, translated them.

~Kiran Atma


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